2011

D. Adler, W. Wieser, F. Trepanier, J. Schmitt, and R. Huber,
Extended coherence length Fourier domain mode locked lasers at 1310 nm, Opt. Express , vol. 19, no. 21, pp. 20930--20939, Oct. 2011. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OE.19.020930
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Adler:11,
author = {Desmond C. Adler and Wolfgang Wieser and Francois Trepanier and Joseph M. Schmitt and Robert A. Huber},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Optical coherence tomography; Lasers, tunable; Medical optics and biotechnology; Dispersion compensation devices ; Fiber Bragg gratings ; Laser modes; Laser sources; Mode locking; Optical delay lines; Swept lasers; Tunable lasers},
number = {21},
pages = {20930--20939},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Extended coherence length Fourier domain mode locked lasers at 1310 nm},
volume = {19},
month = {Oct},
year = {2011},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-19-21-20930},
doi = {10.1364/OE.19.020930},
abstract = {Fourier domain mode locked (FDML) lasers are excellent tunable laser sources for frequency domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) systems due to their combination of high sweep rates, large tuning ranges, and high output powers. However, conventional FDML lasers provide coherence lengths of only 4--10 mm, limiting their use in demanding applications such as intravascular OCT where coherence lengths of \>20 mm are required for optimal imaging of large blood vessels. Furthermore, like most swept lasers, conventional FDML lasers produce only one useable sweep direction per tunable filter drive cycle, halving the effective sweep rate of the laser compared to the filter drive frequency. Here, we demonstrate a new class of FDML laser incorporating broadband dispersion compensation near 1310 nm. Elimination of chromatic dispersion in the FDML cavity results in the generation of forward (short to long wavelength) and backward (long to short wavelength) sweeps with substantially identical properties and coherence lengths of \>21 mm. This advance enables long-range, high-speed FD-OCT imaging without the need for optical buffering stages, significantly reducing laser cost and complexity.},
}
R. Brinkmann, S. Koinzer, K. Schlott, L. Ptaszynski, M. Bever, A. Baade, Y. Miura, R. Birngruber, and J. Roider,
Realtime temperature determination during retinal photocoagulation on patients, 09 2011. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.875276 .
Weblink: https://doi.org/10.1117/12.875276
Bibtex: BibTeX
@book{RN5360,
   author = {Brinkmann, Ralf;Koinzer, Stefan;Schlott, Kerstin;Ptaszynski, Lars;Bever, Marco;Baade, Alex;Miura, Yoko;Birngruber, Reginald and Roider, Johann},
   title = {Realtime temperature determination during retinal photocoagulation on patients},
   publisher = {SPIE},
   volume = {7885},
   series = {SPIE BiOS},
   url = {https://doi.org/10.1117/12.875276},
   year = {2011},
   type = {Book}
}
C. Blatter, B. Grajciar, C. Eigenwillig, W. Wieser, B. Biedermann, R. Huber, and R. Leitgeb,
Extended focus high-speed swept source OCT with self-reconstructive illumination, Opt. Express , vol. 19, no. 13, pp. 12141-12155, 06 2011. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OE.19.012141
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Blatter:11,
author = {Cedric Blatter and Branislav Grajciar and Christoph M. Eigenwillig and Wolfgang Wieser and Benjamin R. Biedermann and Robert Huber and Rainer A. Leitgeb},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Optical coherence tomography; Optical coherence tomography; Flow diagnostics; Coherence tomography ; Functional monitoring and imaging ; Functional imaging; Image quality; Imaging techniques; In vivo imaging; Optical imaging; Three dimensional imaging},
number = {13},
pages = {12141--12155},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Extended focus high-speed swept source OCT with self-reconstructive illumination},
volume = {19},
month = {Jun},
year = {2011},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-19-13-12141},
doi = {10.1364/OE.19.012141},
abstract = {We present a Bessel beam illumination FDOCT setup using a FDML Swept Source at 1300nm with up to 440kHz A-scan rate, and discuss its advantages for structural and functional imaging of highly scattering samples. An extended focus is achieved due to the Bessel beam that preserves its lateral extend over a large depth range. Furthermore, Bessel beams exhibit a self-reconstruction property that allows imaging even behind obstacles such as hairs on skin. Decoupling the illumination from the Gaussian detection increases the global sensitivity and enables dark field imaging. Dark field imaging is useful to avoid strong reflexes from the sample surface that adversely affect the sensitivity due to the limited dynamic range of high speed 8bit acquisition cards. In addition the possibility of contrasting capillaries with high sensitivity is shown, using inter-B-scan speckle variance analysis. We demonstrate intrinsic advantages of the extended focus configuration, in particular the reduction of the phase decorrelation effect below vessels leading to improved axial vessel definition.},
}
T. Klein, W. Wieser, B. Biedermann, C. Eigenwillig, and R. Huber,
FDML laser for megahertz retinal OCT imaging, in CLEO:2011 - Laser Applications to Photonic Applications , Optica Publishing Group, 062011. pp. CWB1.
DOI:10.1364/CLEO_SI.2011.CWB1
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Klein:11,
author = {Thomas Klein and Wolfgang Wieser and Benjamin R. Biedermann and Christoph M. Eigenwillig and Robert Huber},
booktitle = {CLEO:2011 - Laser Applications to Photonic Applications},
journal = {CLEO:2011 - Laser Applications to Photonic Applications},
keywords = {Optical coherence tomography; Lasers, tunable; Image quality; Imaging techniques; Laser modes; Medical imaging; Mode locking; Optical coherence tomography},
pages = {CWB1},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {FDML laser for megahertz retinal OCT imaging},
year = {2011},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/abstract.cfm?URI=CLEO_SI-2011-CWB1},
doi = {10.1364/CLEO_SI.2011.CWB1},
abstract = {A novel Fourier-domain mode locked (FDML) laser design is presented, yielding the highest wavelength sweep speed reported so far around 1050nm. This enables retinal imaging over a ~70{\textdegree} ultra-wide field of view.},
}
C. Blatter, B. Grajciar, C. Eigenwillig, W. Wieser, B. Biedermann, R. Huber, and R. Leitgeb,
High-speed functional OCT with self-reconstructive Bessel illumination at 1300 nm, in Optical Coherence Tomography and Coherence Techniques V , Rainer A. Leitgeb and Brett E. Bouma, Eds. SPIE, 062011. pp. 809104.
DOI:10.1117/12.889669
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{10.1117/12.889669,
author = {Cedric Blatter and Branislav Grajciar and Christoph M. Eigenwillig and Wolfgang Wieser and Benjamin R. Biedermann and Robert Huber and Rainer A. Leitgeb},
title = {{High-speed functional OCT with self-reconstructive Bessel illumination at 1300 nm}},
volume = {8091},
booktitle = {Optical Coherence Tomography and Coherence Techniques V},
editor = {Rainer A. Leitgeb and Brett E. Bouma},
organization = {International Society for Optics and Photonics},
publisher = {SPIE},
pages = {809104},
abstract = {We present a Bessel beam illumination FDOCT setup with FDML buffered swept source at 1300nm. An extended focus
is achieved due to the Bessel beam that preserves its lateral extend over a large depth range. Decoupling the illumination
from the Gaussian detection improves the sensitivity as compared to double passing the ring filter and enables dark field
imaging. Dark field imaging is useful to avoid strong reflexes from the sample's surface that adversely affect the
sensitivity due to the limited dynamic range of high-speed 8bit acquisition cards. Furthermore, Bessel beams exhibit a
self-reconstruction property that allows imaging even behind obstacles such as hairs on skin.
Densely sampled volumes of skin in-vivo with high lateral resolution are acquired at up to 440kHz A-Scan rate. In
addition the possibility of contrasting capillaries with high sensitivity is shown, using inter-B-scan speckle variance
analysis. High-speed imaging is of crucial importance for imaging small details since sample motion artifacts are
reduced and high sampling can be maintained while increasing the B-Scan rate.},
keywords = {Extended focus, Bessel beam, Self-reconstructive illumination, Dark field imaging, Dermatology, Microcirculation imaging, FDML, Swept Source},
year = {2011},
doi = {10.1117/12.889669},
URL = {https://doi.org/10.1117/12.889669}
}
S. Todor, B. Biedermann, W. Wieser, R. Huber, and C. Jirauschek,
Instantaneous lineshape analysis of Fourier domain mode-locked lasers, Opt. Express , vol. 19, no. 9, pp. 8802-8807, 04 2011. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OE.19.008802
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Todor:11,
author = {Sebastian Todor and Benjamin Biedermann and Wolfgang Wieser and Robert Huber and Christian Jirauschek},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Laser theory; Lasers, tunable; Optical coherence tomography; Linewidth; Laser sources; Mode locking; Power spectra; Semiconductor lasers; Swept lasers; Tunable lasers},
number = {9},
pages = {8802--8807},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Instantaneous lineshape analysis of Fourier domain mode-locked lasers},
volume = {19},
month = {Apr},
year = {2011},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-19-9-8802},
doi = {10.1364/OE.19.008802},
abstract = {We present a theoretical and experimental analysis of the instantaneous lineshape of Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) lasers, yielding good agreement. The simulations are performed employing a recently introduced model for FDML operation. Linewidths around 10 GHz are found, which is significantly below the sweep filter bandwidth. The effect of detuning between the sweep filter drive frequency and cavity roundtrip time is studied revealing features that cannot be resolved in the experiment, and shifting of the instantaneous power spectrum against the sweep filter center frequency is analyzed. We show that, in contrast to most other semiconductor based lasers, the instantaneous linewidth is governed neither by external noise sources nor by amplified spontaneous emission, but it is directly determined by the complex FDML dynamics.},
}
C. Blatter, B. Grajciar, R. Huber, and R. Leitgeb,
Structural and functional imaging with extended focus dark-field OCT at 1300nm, in Optical Coherence Tomography and Coherence Domain Optical Methods in Biomedicine XV , James G. Fujimoto and Joseph A. Izatt and Valery V. Tuchin, Eds. SPIE, 022011. pp. 78891D.
DOI:10.1117/12.875594
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{10.1117/12.875594,
author = {Cedric Blatter and Branislav Grajciar and Robert Huber and Rainer A. Leitgeb},
title = {{Structural and functional imaging with extended focus dark-field OCT at 1300nm}},
volume = {7889},
booktitle = {Optical Coherence Tomography and Coherence Domain Optical Methods in Biomedicine XV},
editor = {James G. Fujimoto and Joseph A. Izatt and Valery V. Tuchin},
organization = {International Society for Optics and Photonics},
publisher = {SPIE},
pages = {78891D},
abstract = {We present an extended focus FDOCT setup with FDML swept source centered at 1310nm. The illumination, preserving
its lateral extend over a large depth range thanks to the use of a Bessel beam, is decoupled from the Gaussian detection in
order to increase the global sensitivity. The efficient spatial separation enables dark-field imaging. In-vivo measurements
in the skin were performed to demonstrate the gain in lateral resolution while preserving the imaging depth. More, the
calculation of the speckle variance between B-Scans allows a clear visualization of the microvasculature.},
keywords = {Extended focus, Dark Field imaging, Bessel beam, FDML Swept Source, dermatology, microvascularisation imaging},
year = {2011},
doi = {10.1117/12.875594},
URL = {https://doi.org/10.1117/12.875594}
}
T. Klein, W. Wieser, C. Eigenwillig, B. Biedermann, and R. Huber,
Megahertz OCT for ultrawide-field retinal imaging with a 1050 nm Fourier domain mode-locked laser, Opt. Express , vol. 19, no. 4, pp. 3044--3062, 02 2011. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OE.19.003044
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Klein:11,
author = {Thomas Klein and Wolfgang Wieser and Christoph M. Eigenwillig and Benjamin R. Biedermann and Robert Huber},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Optical coherence tomography; Lasers, tunable; Imaging systems; Ophthalmology; Optical coherence tomography; Retina scanning ; Fiber lasers; Image processing; Image quality; Mode locking; Ophthalmic imaging; Three dimensional imaging},
number = {4},
pages = {3044--3062},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Megahertz OCT for ultrawide-field retinal imaging with a 1050nm Fourier domain mode-locked laser},
volume = {19},
month = {Feb},
year = {2011},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-19-4-3044},
doi = {10.1364/OE.19.003044},
abstract = {We demonstrate ultrahigh speed swept source retinal OCT imaging using a Fourier domain mode locked (FDML) laser. The laser uses a combination of a semiconductor optical amplifier and an ytterbium doped fiber amplifier to provide more than 50mW output power. The 1050nm FDML laser uses standard telecom fiber for the km long delay line instead of two orders of magnitude more expensive real single mode fiber. We investigate the influence of this ``oligo-mode'' fiber on the FDML laser performance. Two design configurations with 684,400 and 1,368,700 axial scans per second are investigated, 25x and 50x faster than current commercial instruments and more than 4x faster than previous single spot ophthalmic results. These high speeds enable the acquisition of densely sampled ultrawide-field data sets of the retina within a few seconds. Ultrawide-field data consisting of 1900 x 1900 A-scans with ~70{\textdegree} degrees angle of view are acquired within only 3 and 6 seconds using the different setups. Such OCT data sets, more than double as large as previously reported, are collapsed to a 4 megapixel high definition fundus image. We achieve good penetration into the choroid by hardware spectral shaping of the laser output. The axial resolution in tissue is 12{\textmu}m (684kHz) and 19{\textmu}m (1.37MHz). A series of new data processing and imaging extraction protocols, enabled by the ultrawide-field isotropic data sets, are presented. Dense isotropic sampling enables both, cross-sectional images along arbitrary coordinates and depth-resolved en-face fundus images. Additionally, we investigate how isotropic averaging compares to the averaging of cross-sections along the slow axis.},
}
A. Obana, R. Brinkmann, Y. Gohto, and K. Nishimura,
A Case of Retinal Injury By A Violet Light-Emitting Diode, Retinal Cases and Brief Reports , vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 223--226 10.1097/ICB.0b013e3181e180d5, 2011.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Obana,
   title        = {A Case of Retinal Injury By A Violet Light-Emitting Diode},
   author       = {Obana, Akira and Brinkmann, Ralf and Gohto, Yuko and Nishimura, Kasumi},
   year         = 2011,
   journal      = {Retinal Cases and Brief Reports},
   volume       = 5,
   number       = 3,
   pages        = {223--226 10.1097/ICB.0b013e3181e180d5},
   abstract     = {Purpose: To describe the first case of retinal injury by a misuse of a toy using light-emitting diode. Methods: A 15-year-old male Japanese student received irradiation on his right eye by a 5 mW light-emitting diode of 410 nm wavelength for 20 seconds in 2 days. He noticed decreased vision and central scotoma approximately 2 weeks later from these events. The mechanism of injury was evaluated from the estimated irradiance on the retina by comparison with experimental threshold data published. Results: Chorioretinal atrophy with visual loss and central scotoma has remained on the fovea. The patient received an estimated dose of 1.58 J/cm2 2 times, which was close to the experimentally determined radiant exposure for photochemical injury of rat retina. Conclusion: The violet light from light-emitting diodes is a potential hazard for the retina, and thus, direct viewing into the beam should be avoided. Children, especially, should not be allowed to play with such toys without being carefully instructed about their proper use and fully supervised.},
   keywords     = {black light light-emitting diode photochemical damage retinal injury visual disturbance. 01271216-201100530-00011}
}
A. Fritz, A. Zegelin, L. Ptaszynski, and R. Brinkmann,
Dynamics of laser induced micro bubble clusters on tissue phantoms, 2011. pp. 78850S-78850S-6.
File: 12.875031.short
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Fritz2011,
   author = {Fritz, Andreas and Zegelin, Andrea and Ptaszynski, Lars and Birngruber, Reginald and Brinkmann, Ralf},
   title = {Dynamics of laser induced micro bubble clusters on tissue phantoms},
   volume = {7885},
   pages = {78850S-78850S-6},
   note = {10.1117/12.875031},
   abstract = {Selective retina treatment (SRT) is a laser based method to treat retinal diseases associated with disorders of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) while preserving photoreceptors and choroid. Applying microsecond laser pulses to the 100- 200 strongly absorbing melanin granules inside the RPE cells induces transient micro bubbles which disrupt the cells. Aim of this work is to understand bubble dynamics in clusters with respect to the influence of the adjacent retina. Bubble dynamics were investigated in vitro on porcine RPE. An about 200 μm thick layer of agarose gel was applied to the RPE layer in order to simulate the mechanical properties of retina. Different laser pulse durations from 1 ns (532 nm, Nd:YAG) to 1.7 μs (527 nm, Nd:YLF) were used. The bubbles were investigated interferometrically (fiber interferometer @ 830 nm) and with fast flash photography (25 ns flash duration). Bubble lifetimes were measured. The results show that with retina phantoms the bubble formation threshold was reached at 2.5 times higher irradiation than without retina phantom for 1.7 μs laser pulses. The microbubbles generated with 1 ns laser pulses were almost not influenced by the agarose layer. Irradiation twofold over bubble formation threshold resulted in 3.5 times longer bubble lifetimes for μs and 2 times longer for ns pulse durations, respectively.},
   url = {https://www.spiedigitallibrary.org/conference-proceedings-of-spie/7885/1/Dynamics-of-laser-induced-micro-bubble-clusters-on-tissue-phantoms/10.1117/12.875031.short},
   type = {Conference Proceedings},
year = { 2011}
}
M. Hagen-Eggert, D. Hillmann, and P. Koch,
Diffusion-sensitive Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography, James, G. Fujimoto and Joseph, A. Izatt and Valery, V. Tuchin, Eds. SPIE, 2011. pp. 78892B.
File: 12.873815.short
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Hagen-Eggert2011,
   author = {Hagen-Eggert, M. and Hillmann, D. and Koch, P. and Huttmann, G.},
   title = {Diffusion-sensitive Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography},
   editor = {James, G. Fujimoto and Joseph, A. Izatt and Valery, V. Tuchin},
   publisher = {SPIE},
   volume = {7889},
   pages = {78892B},

}
D. Hillmann, C. Luhrs, T. Bonin, P. Koch, and A. Vogel,
Holoscopy: holographic optical coherence tomography, Rainer, A. Leitgeb and Brett, E. Bouma, Eds. Proc. SPIE, 2011. pp. 80911H.
File:
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Hillmann2011,
   author = {Hillmann, Dierck and Luhrs, Christian  and Bonin, Tim  and Koch, Peter and Vogel, Alfred  and Huttmann, Gereon },
   title = {Holoscopy: holographic optical coherence tomography},
   editor = {Rainer, A. Leitgeb and Brett, E. Bouma},
   publisher = {Proc. SPIE},
   volume = {8091},
   pages = {80911H},
   url = {http://link.aip.org/link/?PSI/8091/80911H/1
http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.889485},
   type = {Conference Proceedings},
year = { 2011}
}
T. Bonin, and P. Koch,
Comparison of fast swept source full-field OCT with conventional scanning OCT, Rainer, A. Leitgeb and Brett, E. Bouma, Eds. SPIE, 2011. pp. 80911K.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Bonin2011,
   author = {Bonin, Tim and Koch, Peter and Huttmann, Gereon},
   title = {Comparison of fast swept source full-field OCT with conventional scanning OCT},
   editor = {Rainer, A. Leitgeb and Brett, E. Bouma},
   publisher = {SPIE},
   volume = {8091},
   pages = {80911K},
year = { 2011}

}
H. Muller, L. Ptaszynski, K. Schlott, T. Bonin, M. Bever, S. Koinzer, and R. Brinkmann,
Imaging of temperature distribution and retinal tissue changes during photocoagulation by high speed OCT, James, G. Fujimoto and Joseph, A. Izatt and Valery, V. Tuchin, Eds. SPIE, 2011. pp. 78890E.
File: 12.874788
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Müller-2011-2,
   author = {Muller, Heike H. and Ptaszynski, Lars and Schlott, Kerstin and Bonin, Tim and Bever, Marco and Koinzer, Stefan and Birngruber, Reginald and Brinkmann, Ralf and Huttmann, Gereon},
   title = {Imaging of temperature distribution and retinal tissue changes during photocoagulation by high speed OCT},
   editor = {James, G. Fujimoto and Joseph, A. Izatt and Valery, V. Tuchin},
   publisher = {SPIE},
   volume = {7889},
   pages = {78890E},
URL = { https://doi.org/10.1117/12.874788},
year = { 2011}

}
P. Steven, F. Bock, and C. Cursiefen,
Intravital Two-Photon Microscopy of Immune Cell Dynamics in Corneal Lymphatic Vessels, PLoS One , vol. 6(10), pp. e26253, 2011.
File: journal.pone.0026253
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Steven2011,
   author = {Steven, Philipp and Bock, Felix and Hüttmann, Gereon and Cursiefen, Claus},
   title = {Intravital Two-Photon Microscopy of Immune Cell Dynamics in Corneal Lymphatic Vessels},
   journal = {PLoS One},
   volume = {6(10)},  
url = { https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0026253},
   pages = {e26253},
   abstract = {<sec> <title>Background</title> <p>The role of lymphatic vessels in tissue and organ transplantation as well as in tumor growth and metastasis has drawn great attention in recent years.</p> </sec> <sec> <title>Methodology/Principal Findings</title> <p>We now developed a novel method using non-invasive two-photon microscopy to simultaneously visualize and track specifically stained lymphatic vessels and autofluorescent adjacent tissues such as collagen fibrils, blood vessels and immune cells in the mouse model of corneal neovascularization in vivo. The mouse cornea serves as an ideal tissue for this technique due to its easy accessibility and its inducible and modifiable state of pathological hem- and lymphvascularization.</p> <p>Neovascularization was induced by suture placement in corneas of Balb/C mice. Two weeks after treatment, lymphatic vessels were stained intravital by intrastromal injection of a fluorescently labeled LYVE-1 antibody and the corneas were evaluated in vivo by two-photon microscopy (TPM). Intravital TPM was performed at 710 nm and 826 nm excitation wavelengths to detect immunofluorescence and tissue autofluorescence using a custom made animal holder. Corneas were then harvested, fixed and analyzed by histology.</p> <p>Time lapse imaging demonstrated the first in vivo evidence of immune cell migration into lymphatic vessels and luminal transport of individual cells. Cells immigrated within 1–5.5 min into the vessel lumen. Mean velocities of intrastromal corneal immune cells were around 9 µm/min and therefore comparable to those of T-cells and macrophages in other mucosal surfaces.</p> </sec> <sec> <title>Conclusions</title> <p>To our knowledge we here demonstrate for the first time the intravital real-time transmigration of immune cells into lymphatic vessels. Overall this study demonstrates the valuable use of intravital autofluorescence two-photon microscopy in the model of suture-induced corneal vascularizations to study interactions of immune and subsequently tumor cells with lymphatic vessels under close as possible physiological conditions.</p> </sec>},
   year = { 2011}
}
T. Just, H. Pau, and E. Lankenau,
OCT in the field of laryngology: further perspectives, Nikiforos, Kollias and Bernard, Choi and Haishan, Zeng and Hyun Wook, Kang and Bodo, E. Knudsen and Brian, J. Wong and Justus, F. R. Ilgner and Kenton, W. Gregory and Guillermo, J. Tearney and Laura, Marcu and Henry, Hirschberg and Steen, J. Madsen and Andreas, Mandelis and Anita, Mahadevan-Jansen and Jansen, E. Duco, Eds. SPIE, 2011. pp. 78831W.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Just2011,
   author = {Just, T. and Pau, H. W. and Lankenau, E. and Huttmann, G.},
   title = {OCT in the field of laryngology: further perspectives},
   editor = {Nikiforos, Kollias and Bernard, Choi and Haishan, Zeng and Hyun Wook, Kang and Bodo, E. Knudsen and Brian, J. Wong and Justus, F. R. Ilgner and Kenton, W. Gregory and Guillermo, J. Tearney and Laura, Marcu and Henry, Hirschberg and Steen, J. Madsen and Andreas, Mandelis and Anita, Mahadevan-Jansen and Jansen, E. Duco},
   publisher = {SPIE},
   volume = {7883},
   pages = {78831W},
Year = { 2011}

}
K. Schlott, S. Koinzer, L. Ptaszynski, S. Luft, M. Bever, J. Roider, and R. Brinkmann,
Optoacoustic temperature determination and automatic coagulation control in rabbits, in Ophthalmic Technologies XXI , Ho, Fabrice Manns; Per G. Söderberg; Arthur, Eds. Proc. SPIE, 2011.
File: 12.875104
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Schlott2011,
   author = {Schlott, Kerstin and Koinzer, Stefan and Ptaszynski, Lars and Luft, Susanne and Baade, Alex and Bever, Marco and Roider, Johann and Birngruber, Reginald and Brinkmann, Ralf},
   title = {Optoacoustic temperature determination and automatic coagulation control in rabbits},
   booktitle = {Ophthalmic Technologies XXI },
   editor = {Ho, Fabrice Manns; Per G. Söderberg; Arthur},
   publisher = {Proc. SPIE},
   volume = {7885},
   note = {10.1117/12.875104},
   abstract = {Retinal laser photocoagulation is an established treatment method for many retinal diseases like macula edema or diabetic retinopathy. The selection of the laser parameters is so far based on post treatment evaluation of the lesion size and strength. Due to local pigment variations in the fundus and individual transmission the same laser parameters often lead to an overtreatment. Optoacoustic allows a non invasive monitoring of the retinal temperature increase during retinal laser irradiation by measuring the temperature dependent pressure amplitudes, which are induced by short probe laser pulses. A 75 ns/ 523 nm Nd:YLF was used as a probe laser at a repetition rate of 1 kHz, and a cw / 532 nm treatment laser for heating. A contact lens was modified with a ring-shaped ultrasonic transducer to detect the pressure waves at the cornea. Temperatures were collected for irradiations leading to soft or invisible lesions. Based on this data the threshold for denaturation was found. By analyzing the initial temperature increase, the further temperature development during irradiation could be predicted. An algorithm was found to calculate the irradiation time, which is needed for a soft lesion formation, from the temperature curve. By this it was possible to provide a real-time dosimetry by automatically switching off the treatment laser after the calculated irradiation time. Automatically controlled coagulations appear softer and more uniformly.},
   keywords = {AutoPhoN},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.875104},
   type = {Conference Proceedings},
year = { 2011}
}
J. Horstmann, A. Baade, and R. Brinkmann,
Photoacoustic blood vessel detection during surgical laser interventions, SPIE ECBO, 2011. pp. 80920Z-80920Z-6.
File: 12.889635
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Horstmann2011,
   author = {Horstmann, Jens and Baade, Alexander and Brinkmann, Ralf},
   title = {Photoacoustic blood vessel detection during surgical laser interventions},
   publisher = {SPIE ECBO},
   volume = {8092},
   pages = {80920Z-80920Z-6},
   note = {10.1117/12.889635},
   abstract = {This paper presents a discussion about the potential of photoacoustics with regard to its application in surgical assistance during minimally invasive, laser assisted interventions. Aim of the work is the detection of obscured large blood vessels in order to prevent unintentional dissection. Based on spectroscopic investigations of the target tissue (liver), a wavelength for the photoacoustic excitation laser was chosen with respect to a high absorption contrast between the vessel and the surrounding liver tissue. An experimental setup featuring a simple liver model is created. Preliminary results show, that vessels with a diameter of 2 mm can be detected up to a distance of 1 mm from the treatment fibre. It is shown, that detection of acoustic waves induced inside liver is feasible over distances higher than 10 cm.},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.889635},
   type = {Conference Proceedings},
year = { 2011}
}
A. Vogel, and V. Venugopalan,
Pulsed Laser Ablation of Soft Biological Tissues, in Optical-Thermal Response of Laser-Irradiated Tissue , 2011, pp. 551-615.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inbook{Vogel-2011,
   author = {Vogel, Alfred and Venugopalan, Vasan},
   title = {Pulsed Laser Ablation of Soft Biological Tissues},
   booktitle = {Optical-Thermal Response of Laser-Irradiated Tissue},
   pages = {551-615},
   year = { 2011}
}
A Vogel, and V. Venugopalan,
Pulsed laser ablation of tissue., .... 2 Springer, Heidelberg, New York, 2011.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@book{Vogel-2011-2,
   author = {Vogel, A and Venugopalan, V.},
   title = {Pulsed laser ablation of tissue},
   publisher = {Springer, Heidelberg, New York},
   edition = {2},
   year = { 2011}
}
T. Bonin, M. Hagen-Eggert, G. Franke, and P. Koch,
Ultra highspeed in-vivo Fourier domain full-field OCT of the human retina, James, G. Fujimoto and Joseph, A. Izatt and Valery, V. Tuchin, Eds. SPIE, 2011. pp. 788906.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Bonin2011,
   author = {Bonin, Tim and Hagen-Eggert, Martin and Franke, Gesa and Koch, Peter and Huttmann, Gereon},
   title = {Ultra highspeed in-vivo Fourier domain full-field OCT of the human retina},
   editor = {James, G. Fujimoto and Joseph, A. Izatt and Valery, V. Tuchin},
   publisher = {SPIE},
   volume = {7889},
   pages = {788906},
year = { 2011}

}
A. Alex, J. Weingast, B. Hofer, M. Eibl, M. Binder, H. Pehamberger, W. Drexler, and B. Považay,
3D optical coherence tomography for clinical diagnosis of nonmelanoma skin cancers, Imaging in Medicine , vol. 3, no. 6, pp. 653-674, 2011.
Weblink: https://www.openaccessjournals.com/articles/3d-optical-coherence-tomography-for-clinical-diagnosis-of-nonmelanoma-skin-cancers-9179.html
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Alex2011,
   author = {Alex, A. and Weingast, J. and Hofer, B. and Eibl, M. and Binder, M. and Pehamberger, H. and Drexler, W. and Považay, B.},
   title = {3D optical coherence tomography for clinical diagnosis of nonmelanoma skin cancers},
   journal = {Imaging in Medicine},
   volume = {3},
   number = {6},
   keyword = {cancer diagnosis, contrast-enhanced imaging, dermatology, functional imaging,microscopy, multimodal imaging, optical coherence tomography, optical imaging, tomography},
  abstract = {High-resolution frequency domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) stands out amongst a range of novel dermatologic imaging technologies, with its good detection sensitivity around-100 dB, high measurement speeds allowing real-time image acquisition and its ability to acquire high definition cross-sectional and 3D tomograms of regions greater than 1 cm2, providing tissue information comparable to conventional histopathology without the need for any contrast agents. Typical axial and transverse resolutions of state-of-the-art OCT systems range between 1-10 m and approximately 20 m, respectively, depending on the employed wavelength region. This review investigates the significant progress accomplished in the field of dermatologic OCT with respect to other in vivo diagnostic methods for pre-excisional imaging of nonmelanoma skin cancers and specifically emphasizes state-of-the-art results achieved in different clinical pilot studies. Further technological extensions of OCT, various multimodal imaging approaches as well as potential clinical dermatologic applications are discussed. © 2011 Future Medicine Ltd.},
   pages = {653-674},
   url = {https://www.openaccessjournals.com/articles/3d-optical-coherence-tomography-for-clinical-diagnosis-of-nonmelanoma-skin-cancers-9179.html},
   year = {2011},
keywords = {AG-Huber, OCT},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
R. Rahmanzadeh, F. Rudnitzki, E. Endl, and T. Hasan,
Targeted molecular effects through laser-irradiated nanoabsorbers, in Proc. SPIE , Newsrrom, SPIE, Eds. 2011.
DOI:10.1117/2.1201102.003548
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Hüttmann2011,
   author = {Hüttmann, Gereon and Rahmanzadeh, Ramtin and Rudnitzki, Florian and Endl, Elmar and Hasan, Tayyaba},
   title = {Targeted molecular effects through laser-irradiated nanoabsorbers},
   editor = {Newsrrom, SPIE},
   DOI = {10.1117/2.1201102.003548},
   type = {Conference Proceedings},
   year = { 2011}
}
A. Obana, R. Brinkmann, Y. Gohto, and K. Nishimura,
A Case of Retinal Injury By A Violet Light-Emitting Diode, Retinal Cases and Brief Reports , vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 223-226 10.1097/ICB.0b013e3181e180d5, 2011.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Obana,
   author = {Obana, Akira and Brinkmann, Ralf and Gohto, Yuko and Nishimura, Kasumi},
   title = {A Case of Retinal Injury By A Violet Light-Emitting Diode},
   journal = {Retinal Cases and Brief Reports},
   volume = {5},
   number = {3},
   pages = {223-226 10.1097/ICB.0b013e3181e180d5},
   abstract = {Purpose: To describe the first case of retinal injury by a misuse of a toy using light-emitting diode. Methods: A 15-year-old male Japanese student received irradiation on his right eye by a 5 mW light-emitting diode of 410 nm wavelength for 20 seconds in 2 days. He noticed decreased vision and central scotoma approximately 2 weeks later from these events. The mechanism of injury was evaluated from the estimated irradiance on the retina by comparison with experimental threshold data published. Results: Chorioretinal atrophy with visual loss and central scotoma has remained on the fovea. The patient received an estimated dose of 1.58 J/cm2 2 times, which was close to the experimentally determined radiant exposure for photochemical injury of rat retina. Conclusion: The violet light from light-emitting diodes is a potential hazard for the retina, and thus, direct viewing into the beam should be avoided. Children, especially, should not be allowed to play with such toys without being carefully instructed about their proper use and fully supervised.},
   keywords = {black light
light-emitting diode
photochemical damage
retinal injury
visual disturbance.
01271216-201100530-00011},
   year = {2011}
}
J. Wang, Z. Li, F. Xue, and Z. Zhang,
Brownian diffusion of gold nanoparticles in an optical trap studied by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, Laser Physics , vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 130-136, 2011.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Wang,
   author = {Wang, J. and Li, Z. and Yao, C. and Xue, F. and Zhang, Z. and Hüttmann, G.},
   title = {Brownian diffusion of gold nanoparticles in an optical trap studied by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy},
   journal = {Laser Physics},
   volume = {21},
   number = {1},
   pages = {130-136},
   keywords = {Physik und Astronomie},
   year = {2011}
}
R. Rahmanzadeh, J. Celli, I. Rizvi, J. Gerdes, and T. Hasan,
The proliferation marker Ki-67 as novel molecular target for PDT, Photodiagnosis and Photodynamic Therapy , vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 129, 2011.
DOI:10.1016/j.pdpdt.2011.03.025
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Rahmanzadeh2011,
   author = {Rahmanzadeh, R. and Celli, J. and Rizvi, I. and Gerdes, J. and Hasan, T.},
   title = {The proliferation marker Ki-67 as novel molecular target for PDT},
   journal = {Photodiagnosis and Photodynamic Therapy},
   volume = {8},
   number = {2},
 pages = {129},
   DOI = {10.1016/j.pdpdt.2011.03.025},
   year = {2011},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
C. Klatt, M. Saeger, T. Oppermann, E. Porksen, F. Treumer, J. Hillenkamp, E. Fritzer, and J. Roider,
Selective retina therapy for acute central serous chorioretinopathy, Br J Ophthalmol , vol. 95, no. 1, pp. 83-8, 2011.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Klatt,
   author = {Klatt, C. and Saeger, M. and Oppermann, T. and Porksen, E. and Treumer, F. and Hillenkamp, J. and Fritzer, E. and Brinkmann, R. and Birngruber, R. and Roider, J.},
   title = {Selective retina therapy for acute central serous chorioretinopathy},
   journal = {Br J Ophthalmol},
   volume = {95},
   number = {1},
   pages = {83-8},
   note = {Using Smart Source Parsing
Jan; Epub 2010 Jun 15},
   abstract = {AIMS: To evaluate selective retina therapy (SRT) as a treatment of acute central serous chorioretinopathy. METHODS: 30 eyes of 30 patients with central serous chorioretinopathy of at least a 3 months' duration were recruited. 14 eyes were randomised to an SRT group (Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium lithium fluoride (Nd:YLF) laser, wavelength 527 nm, t=1.7 mus, energy 100-370 muJ, spot diameter 200 mum, pulse repetition rate 100 Hz,) and 16 eyes to a control group. After 3 months of follow-up, patients in the control group with persistence of subretinal fluid (SRF) were allocated to a cross-over group, treated with SRT and followed up for further 3 months. The main outcome measures were change of best-corrected Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity (BCVA) and SRF. RESULTS: At 3 months of follow-up, the mean (SD) improvement of BCVA was significantly greater after SRT than in the control group: 12.7 (7.2) versus 6.3 (8.9) letters (p=0.04). SRF had decreased significantly more after SRT as compared with that the control group: 203 (136) mum versus 41 (150) mum (p=0.005). In eight eyes allocated to the cross-over group, the mean BCVA had increased during 3 months of follow up before SRT by 1.4 (5.2) letters and continued to increase during 3 months following SRT by 7.4 (6.3) letters, while SRF increased by 39.5 (160.2) mum before SRT and decreased by 151.5 (204.9) mum after SRT. In six of the eight eyes, SRF had completely resolved 3 months after SRT. CONCLUSIONS: SRT appears to expedite functional recovery and the re-absorption of SRF as compared with that in untreated controls. A larger prospective, randomised phase 3 confirmative patient study is warranted. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT00987077.},
   year = {2011}
}
Y. Miura,
Retinal pigment epithelium-choroid organ culture, Expert Rev Ophthalmol , vol. 6, no. 6, pp. 669-680, 2011.
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1586/eop.11.70
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Miura2011,
   author = {Miura, Yoko},
   title = {Retinal pigment epithelium-choroid organ culture},
   journal = {Expert Rev  Ophthalmol},
   volume = {6},
   number = {6},
   pages = {669-680},
   abstract = {The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays a vital role in retinal function, and therefore studies on RPE provide a significant benefit for our visual function. In order to obtain useful information from study results, choosing the suitable experimental model for each purpose of study is of great importance. Although RPE cell cultures are widely used, cells in cell culture have significantly different phenotypical characteristics from in vivo cells. The advantage of using native tissue is that cells in the tissue have close biological properties to in vivo conditions. This review describes basic characteristics of native RPE–choroid tissues in comparison to RPE cells in cell culture and introduces the possibility of preserving tissues in different culture systems. Advantages and disadvantages of organ culture and suitable studies with recent study results are also introduced.},
   year = {2011}
}
S Koinzer, K Schlott, L Ptaszynski, and J Roider,
Realtime temperature determination during retinal photocoagulation on patients., Proc SPIE , vol. 7885, pp. 78850R, 2011.
File: proceeding.aspx
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Brinkmann2011,
   author = {Brinkmann, R and Koinzer, S and Schlott, K and Ptaszynski, L and Bever, M and Baade, A and Miura, Y and Birngruber, R and Roider, J},
   title = {Realtime temperature determination during retinal photocoagulation on patients.},
   journal = {Proc SPIE},
   volume = {7885},
   pages = {78850R},
   abstract = {Retinal photocoagulation is a long time established treatment for a variety of retinal diseases, most commonly applied for diabetic macular edema and diabetic retinopathy. The damage extent of the induced thermal coagulations depend on the temperature increase and the time of irradiation. So far, the induced temperature rise is unknown due to intraocular variations in light transmission and scattering and RPE/choroidal pigmentation, which can vary inter- and intraindividually by more than a factor of four. Thus in clinical practice, often stronger and deeper coagulations are applied than therapeutically needed, which lead to extended retinal damage and strong pain perception. The final goal of this project focuses on a dosimetry control, which automatically generates a desired temperature profile and thus coagulation strength for every individual coagulation spot, ideally unburden the ophthalmologist from any laser settings. In this paper we present the first realtime temperature measurements achieved on patients during retinal photocoagulation by means of an optoacoustic method, making use of the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient of retinal tissue. Therefore, nanosecond probe laser pulses are repetitively and simultaneously applied with the treatment radiation in order to excite acoustic waves, which are detected at the cornea with an ultrasonic transducer embedded in the contact lens and then are processed by PC.},
   url = {http://proceedings.spiedigitallibrary.org/proceeding.aspx?articleid=732381},
   year = {2011},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
S. Tedsen, C. Doehn, D. Jocham, and I. Schmeling,
Comparison between a 1.92-mum fiber laser and a standard HF-dissection device for nephron-sparing kidney resection in a porcine in vivo study, Lasers Med Sci , vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 509-14, 2011.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Theisen-Kunde,
   author = {Theisen-Kunde, D. and Tedsen, S. and Doehn, C. and Jocham, D. and Kausch von Schmeling, I.},
   title = {Comparison between a 1.92-mum fiber laser and a standard HF-dissection device for nephron-sparing kidney resection in a porcine in vivo study},
   journal = {Lasers Med Sci},
   volume = {26},
   number = {4},
   pages = {509-14},
   note = {Theisen-Kunde, Dirk
Tedsen, Sonke
Doehn, Christian
Jocham, Dieter
Kausch von Schmeling, Ingo
England
Lasers Med Sci. 2011 Jul;26(4):509-14. Epub 2011 Jan 18.},
   abstract = {Nephron-sparing surgery was performed in a porcine model with a 1.92-mum fiber laser dissection device in comparison to a standard high-frequency dissection device. In nine pigs, general anesthesia and a median laparotomy were performed to expose both kidneys. On six kidneys (three HF and three laser) a partial renal parenchyma resection of the lower pole without opening of the renal pelvis was performed (group A). On 12 kidneys (four HF and eight laser), a hemi nephrectomy with opening of the renal pelvis was performed (group B). Total resection time including hemostasis of the remaining tissue was 501 +/- 394 s in group "A-laser " vs. 176 +/- 139 s in group "A-HF". For the group "B", the total resection time was 1174 +/- 501 s (B laser) vs. 960 +/- 407 s (B-HF). Blood loss was 28 +/- 22 ml in group "A laser " vs. 15 +/- 15 ml in group "A-HF". In group "B", the blood loss was 98 +/- 73 ml (B laser) vs. 137 +/- 118 ml (B-HF). No ischemic time for the kidneys was needed in group "A" for both dissection devices. In group "B", ischemia of the kidneys was performed three times during the eight laser procedures (420 +/- 60 s) and only once at the four HF procedures (1,260 s). Healing process was observed over 4-6 weeks, survival rate was 100%, and no renal fistulas were found after the survival period. In conclusion, no significant differences were found between the compared dissection devices. However, the laser system with the flexible transmission fiber may have an advantage for a laparoscopic approach by steerable instruments.},
   keywords = {Animals
Carcinoma, Renal Cell/*surgery
Hemostasis
Kidney/*surgery
Kidney Neoplasms/*surgery
Laser Therapy/*instrumentation/methods
Swine},
   year = {2011}
}
M. Szaszák, P. Steven, K. Shima, R. Orzekowsky-Schröder, I. König, W. Solbach, and J. Rupp,
Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Unravels <italic>C. trachomatis</italic> Metabolism and Its Crosstalk with the Host Cell, PLoS Pathog , vol. 7, no. 7, pp. e1002108, 2011.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Szaszak,
   author = {Szaszák, Márta and Steven, Philipp and Shima, Kensuke and Orzekowsky-Schröder, Regina and Hüttmann, Gereon and König, Inke R. and Solbach, Werner and Rupp, Jan},
   title = {Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Unravels <italic>C. trachomatis</italic> Metabolism and Its Crosstalk with the Host Cell},
   journal = {PLoS Pathog},
   volume = {7},
   number = {7},
   pages = {e1002108},
   abstract = {<title>Author Summary</title> <p>Separate analysis of host and pathogen metabolic changes in intracellular <italic>C. trachomatis</italic> infections is arduous and has not been comprehensively realized so far. A more detailed understanding about the metabolic activity and needs of <italic>C. trachomatis</italic> and its specific interactions with the host cell would be the basis for the development of novel treatment strategies. We therefore applied fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of the metabolic coenzymes NAD(P)H using two-photon microscopy to directly visualize metabolic changes of host cells and pathogens in living cells. NAD(P)H fluorescence was detected both on the chlamydial inclusion membrane and inside the inclusion. Interestingly, changes in chlamydial growth and progeny induced by glucose starvation and IFN? treatment were directly linked to significant changes of the NAD(P)H fluorescence lifetimes inside the inclusions. Furthermore, measurement of the NAD(P)H fluorescence lifetime in the host cell nucleus revealed that infected cells were programmed for starvation during the metabolically active phase of intracellular chlamydial growth. Our findings highlight for the first time a direct interaction between host and pathogen metabolism in intracellular bacterial infections that exceeds sole competition for nutrients. In conclusion, fluorescence lifetime imaging of NAD(P)H by two-photon microscopy enables real-time analysis of metabolic host-pathogen interactions in intracellular infections with high spatial and temporal resolution.</p>},
   year = {2011}
}
W. Wieser, and F. Trepanier,
Extended coherence length \{Fourier} domain mode locked lasers at 1310\~{}\{nm}., Optics express , vol. 19, no. 21, pp. 20930--20939, 2011. OSA.
DOI:10.1364/OE.19.020930
File: abstract.cfm
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{HU_2011_Adler,

author = {Adler, D C Desmond C and Wieser, Wolfgang and Trepanier, Francois and Schmitt, Joseph M and Huber, Robert A},
doi = {10.1364/OE.19.020930},
issn = {1094-4087},
journal = {Optics express},

number = {21},
pages = {20930--20939},
pmid = {21997102},
publisher = {OSA},

title = {{Extended coherence length \{Fourier\} domain mode locked lasers at 1310\~{}\{nm\}.}},
url = {http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?uri=oe-19-21-20930},
volume = {19},
year = {2011}
}
R. Orzekowsky-Schroeder, A. Klinger, B. Martensen, M. Blessenohl, A. Gebert, and A. Vogel,
In vivo spectral imaging of different cell types in the small intestine by two-photon excited autofluorescence, Journal of Biomedical Optics , vol. 16, no. 11, pp. 116025, 2011.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Orzekowsky2011,
   author = {Orzekowsky-Schroeder, Regina and Klinger, Antje and Martensen, Bjorn and Blessenohl, Maike and Gebert, Andreas and Vogel, Alfred and Huttmann, Gereon},
   title = {In vivo spectral imaging of different cell types in the small intestine by two-photon excited autofluorescence},
   journal = {Journal of Biomedical Optics},
   volume = {16},
   number = {11},
   pages = {116025},
   keywords = {biological organs
biomedical optical imaging
cellular biophysics
fluorescence
laser applications in medicine
two-photon processes},
   year = {2011}
}
D. Hillmann, C. Luhrs, T. Bonin, and P. Koch,
Holoscopy--holographic optical coherence tomography, Opt Lett , vol. 36, no. 13, pp. 2390-2, 2011.
DOI:10.1364/OL.36.002390
File: 21725421
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Hillmann2011-1,
   author = {Hillmann, D. and Luhrs, C. and Bonin, T. and Koch, P. and Huttmann, G.},
   title = {Holoscopy--holographic optical coherence tomography},
   journal = {Opt Lett},
   volume = {36},
   number = {13},
   pages = {2390-2},
   abstract = {Scanning optical coherence tomography (OCT) is limited in sensitivity and resolution by the restricted focal depth of the confocal detection scheme. Holoscopy, a combination of holography and Fourier-domain full-field OCT, is proposed as a way to detect photons from all depths of a sample volume simultaneously with uniform sensitivity and lateral resolution, even at high NAs. By using the scalar diffraction theory, as frequently applied in digital holographic imaging, we fully reconstruct the object field with depth-invariant imaging quality. In vivo imaging of human skin is demonstrated with an image quality comparable to conventionally scanned OCT.},
   keywords = {Fingers
Fourier Analysis
Holography/*methods
Humans
Photons
Tomography, Optical Coherence/*methods},
   ISSN = {1539-4794 (Electronic)
0146-9592 (Linking)},
   DOI = {10.1364/OL.36.002390},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21725421},
   year = {2011},
   type = {Journal Article}
}

2010

W. Wieser, B. Biedermann, T. Klein, C. Eigenwillig, and R. Huber,
High-Quality 3-D Imaging with Multimegahertz OCT, Opt. Photon. News , vol. 21, no. 12, pp. 28-29, Dec. 2010. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OPN.21.12.000028
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Wieser:10,
author = {Wolfgang Wieser and Benjamin R. Biedermann and Thomas Klein and Christoph M. Eigenwillig and Robert Huber},
journal = {Opt. Photon. News},
keywords = {General; Analog to digital converters; Crystallography; Image quality; Optical coherence tomography; Real time imaging; Three dimensional imaging},
number = {12},
pages = {28--28},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {High-Quality 3-D Imaging withMultimegahertz OCT},
volume = {21},
month = {Dec},
year = {2010},
url = {https://www.optica-opn.org/abstract.cfm?URI=opn-21-12-28},
doi = {10.1364/OPN.21.12.000028},
abstract = {We have developed interferometric systems to measure nanosize structures and freeze their motion in time. Researchers have also suggested a method to extract both phase and amplitude information for crystallography.},
}
B. Biedermann, W. Wieser, C. Eigenwillig, T. Klein, and R. Huber,
Direct measurement of the instantaneous linewidth of rapidly wavelength-swept lasers, Opt. Lett. , vol. 35, no. 22, pp. 3733-3735, Nov. 2010. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OL.35.003733
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Biedermann:10,
author = {Benjamin R. Biedermann and Wolfgang Wieser and Christoph M. Eigenwillig and Thomas Klein and Robert Huber},
journal = {Opt. Lett.},
keywords = {Optical coherence tomography; Lasers, tunable; Electrooptical modulators; Fourier transforms; Laser light; Laser sources; Optical coherence tomography; Swept lasers},
number = {22},
pages = {3733--3735},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Direct measurement of the instantaneous linewidth of rapidly wavelength-swept lasers},
volume = {35},
month = {Nov},
year = {2010},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/ol/abstract.cfm?URI=ol-35-22-3733},
doi = {10.1364/OL.35.003733},
abstract = {The instantaneous linewidth of rapidly wavelength-swept laser sources as used for optical coherence tomography (OCT) is of crucial interest for a deeper understanding of physical effects involved in their operation. Swept lasers for OCT, typically sweeping over ~15 THz in ~10$\mu$s, have linewidths of several gigahertz. The high optical-frequency sweep speed makes it impossible to measure the instantaneous spectrum with standard methods. Hence, up to now, experimental access to the instantaneous linewidth was rather indirect by the inverse Fourier transform of the coherence decay. In this Letter, we present a method by fast synchronous time gating and extraction of a ``snapshot'' of the instantaneous spectrum with an electro-optic modulator, which can subsequently be measured with an optical spectrum analyzer. This new method is analyzed in detail, and systematic artifacts, such as sideband generation due to the modulation and residual wavelength uncertainty due to the sweeping operation, are quantified. The method is checked for consistency with results from the common, more indirect measurement via coherence properties.},
}
W. Wieser, B. Biedermann, T. Klein, C. Eigenwillig, and R. Huber,
Multi-megahertz OCT: High quality 3D imaging at 20 million A-scans and 4.5 GVoxels per second, Opt. Express , vol. 18, no. 14, pp. 14685-14704, 07 2010. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OE.18.014685
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Wieser:10,
author = {Wolfgang Wieser and Benjamin R. Biedermann and Thomas Klein and Christoph M. Eigenwillig and Robert Huber},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Optical coherence tomography; Three-dimensional image acquisition; Lasers, tunable; Optical coherence tomography; Biological imaging; High speed imaging; Image processing algorithms; Image quality; Point spread function; Three dimensional imaging},
number = {14},
pages = {14685--14704},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Multi-Megahertz OCT: High quality 3D imaging at 20 million A-scans and 4.5 GVoxels per second},
volume = {18},
month = {Jul},
year = {2010},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-18-14-14685},
doi = {10.1364/OE.18.014685},
abstract = {We present ultra high speed optical coherence tomography (OCT) with multi-megahertz line rates and investigate the achievable image quality. The presented system is a swept source OCT setup using a Fourier domain mode locked (FDML) laser. Three different FDML-based swept laser sources with sweep rates of 1, 2.6 and 5.2MHz are compared. Imaging with 4 spots in parallel quadruples the effective speed, enabling depth scan rates as high as 20.8 million lines per second. Each setup provides at least 98dB sensitivity and ~10{\textmu}m resolution in tissue. High quality 2D and 3D imaging of biological samples is demonstrated at full scan speed. A discussion about how to best specify OCT imaging speed is included. The connection between voxel rate, line rate, frame rate and hardware performance of the OCT setup such as sample rate, analog bandwidth, coherence length, acquisition dead-time and scanner duty cycle is provided. Finally, suitable averaging protocols to further increase image quality are discussed.},
}
S. Marschall, T. Klein, W. Wieser, B. Biedermann, K. Hsu, K. Hansen, B. Sumpf, K. Hasler, G. Erbert, O. Jensen, C. Pedersen, R. Huber, and P. Andersen,
Fourier domain mode-locked swept source at 1050 nm based on a tapered amplifier, Opt. Express , vol. 18, no. 15, pp. 15820-15831, 07 2010. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OE.18.015820
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Marschall:10,
author = {Sebastian Marschall and Thomas Klein and Wolfgang Wieser and Benjamin R. Biedermann and Kevin Hsu and Kim P. Hansen and Bernd Sumpf and Karl-Heinz Hasler and G\"{o}tz Erbert and Ole B. Jensen and Christian Pedersen and Robert Huber and Peter E. Andersen},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Optical coherence tomography; Lasers, tunable; Semiconductor lasers; Semiconductor optical amplifiers; Dispersion; High speed imaging; Laser light; Optical delay lines; Optical fibers; Optical standards; Swept sources},
number = {15},
pages = {15820--15831},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Fourier domain mode-locked swept source at 1050 nm based on a tapered amplifier},
volume = {18},
month = {Jul},
year = {2010},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-18-15-15820},
doi = {10.1364/OE.18.015820},
abstract = {While swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) in the 1050 nm range is promising for retinal imaging, there are certain challenges. Conventional semiconductor gain media have limited output power, and the performance of high-speed Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) lasers suffers from chromatic dispersion in standard optical fiber. We developed a novel light source with a tapered amplifier as gain medium, and investigated the FDML performance comparing two fiber delay lines with different dispersion properties. We introduced an additional gain element into the resonator, and thereby achieved stable FDML operation, exploiting the full bandwidth of the tapered amplifier despite high dispersion. The light source operates at a repetition rate of 116 kHz with an effective average output power in excess of 30 mW. With a total sweep range of 70 nm, we achieved an axial resolution of 15 {\textmu}m in air (~11 {\textmu}m in tissue) in OCT measurements. As our work shows, tapered amplifiers are suitable gain media for swept sources at 1050 nm with increased output power, while high gain counteracts dispersion effects in an FDML laser.},
}
S. Marschall, T. Klein, W. Wieser, B. Biedermann, K. Hsu, B. Sumpf, K. Hasler, G. Erbert, O. Jensen, C. Pedersen, R. Huber, and P. Andersen,
High-power FDML laser for swept source-OCT at 1060 nm, in Biophotonics: Photonic Solutions for Better Health Care II , Jürgen Popp and Wolfgang Drexler and Valery V. Tuchin and Dennis L. Matthews, Eds. SPIE, 052010. pp. 77150B.
DOI:10.1117/12.854238
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{10.1117/12.854238,
author = {Sebastian Marschall and Thomas Klein and Wolfgang Wieser and Benjamin Biedermann and Kevin Hsu and Bernd Sumpf and Karl-Heinz Hasler and G{\"o}tz Erbert and Ole B. Jensen and Christian Pedersen and Robert Huber and Peter E. Andersen},
title = {{High-power FDML laser for swept source-OCT at 1060 nm}},
volume = {7715},
booktitle = {Biophotonics: Photonic Solutions for Better Health Care II},
editor = {J{\"u}rgen Popp and Wolfgang Drexler and Valery V. Tuchin and Dennis L. Matthews},
organization = {International Society for Optics and Photonics},
publisher = {SPIE},
pages = {77150B},
abstract = {We present a novel frequency-swept light source working at 1060nm that utilizes a tapered amplifier as gain
medium. These devices feature significantly higher saturation power than conventional semiconductor optical
amplifiers and can thus improve the limited output power of swept sources in this wavelength range. We
demonstrate that a tapered amplifier can be integrated into a 
fiber-based swept source and allows for high-speed
FDML operation. The developed light source operates at a sweep rate of 116kHz with an effective average
output power in excess of 30mW. With a total sweep range of 70 nm an axial resolution of 15 &mu;m in air (~11&mu;m
in tissue) for OCT applications can be achieved.},
keywords = {optical coherence tomography, swept source, tunable laser, tapered amplifier, fourier domain mode-locking},
year = {2010},
doi = {10.1117/12.854238},
URL = {https://doi.org/10.1117/12.854238}
}
S. Todor, C. Jirauschek, B. Biedermann, and R. Huber,
Linewidth Optimization of Fourier Domain Mode-Locked Lasers, Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics 2010 , pp. CMW7, 05 2010. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/CLEO.2010.CMW7
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Todor:10,
author = {Sebastian Todor and Christian Jirauschek and Benjamin Biedermann and Robert Huber},
booktitle = {Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics 2010},
journal = {Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics 2010},
keywords = {Lasers and laser optics; Laser theory; Lasers, tunable; Laser light; Laser operation; Mode locking; Optical amplifiers; Self phase modulation; Tunable lasers},
pages = {CMW7},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Linewidth Optimization of Fourier Domain Mode-Locked Lasers},
year = {2010},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/abstract.cfm?URI=CLEO-2010-CMW7},
doi = {10.1364/CLEO.2010.CMW7},
abstract = {We theoretically and experimentally investigate the instantaneous linewidth of Fourier domain mode-locked lasers, yielding good agreement. Based on simulations, strategies are discussed to drastically reduce the laser linewidth.},
}
S. Marschall, T. Klein, W. Wieser, B. Biedermann, K. Hsu, B. Sumpf, K. Hasler, G. Erbert, O. Jensen, C. Pedersen, R. Huber, and P. Andersen,
FDML swept source at 1060 nm using a tapered amplifier, in Optical Coherence Tomography and Coherence Domain Optical Methods in Biomedicine XIV , Joseph A. Izatt and James G. Fujimoto and Valery V. Tuchin, Eds. International Society for Optics and Photonics, 022010. pp. 75541H.
DOI:10.1117/12.842011
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{10.1117/12.842011,
author = {Sebastian Marschall and Thomas Klein and Wolfgang Wieser and Benjamin Biedermann and Kevin Hsu and Bernd Sumpf and Karl-Heinz Hasler and G{\"o}tz Erbert and Ole B. Jensen and Christian Pedersen and Robert Huber and Peter E. Andersen},
title = {{FDML swept source at 1060 nm using a tapered amplifier}},
volume = {7554},
booktitle = {Optical Coherence Tomography and Coherence Domain Optical Methods in Biomedicine XIV},
editor = {Joseph A. Izatt and James G. Fujimoto and Valery V. Tuchin},
organization = {International Society for Optics and Photonics},
publisher = {SPIE},
pages = {75541H},
abstract = {We present a novel frequency-swept light source working at 1060nm that utilizes a tapered amplifier as gain
medium. These devices feature significantly higher saturation power than conventional semiconductor optical
amplifiers and can thus improve the limited output power of swept sources in this wavelength range. We
demonstrate that a tapered amplifier can be integrated into a fiber-based swept source and allows for high-speed
FDML operation. The developed light source operates at a sweep rate of 116kHz with an effective average
output power in excess of 30mW. With a total sweep range of 70 nm an axial resolution of 15 &mu;m in air (~11&mu;m in tissue) for OCT applications can be achieved.},
keywords = {optical coherence tomography, swept source, tunable laser, tapered amplifier, fourier domain mode-locking},
year = {2010},
doi = {10.1117/12.842011},
URL = {https://doi.org/10.1117/12.842011}
}

2009

J. Probst, and P. Koch,
"Real Time 3D Rendering of Coherence Tomography Volumetric Data" 14.. 2009.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@techreport{Probst,
   author = {Probst, J. and Koch, P. and Hüttmann, G},
   title = {Real Time 3D Rendering of Coherence Tomography Volumetric Data},
   month = {14.-16.06.2009},
   year = {2009}
}

2010

T. Just, E. Lankenau, and H. Pau,
An optical coherence tomography study for imaging the round window niche and the promontorium tympani, Nikiforos, Kollias and Bernard, Choi and Haishan, Zeng and Reza, S. Malek and Brian, J. Wong and Justus, F. R. Ilgner and Kenton, W. Gregory and Guillermo, J. Tearney and Laura, Marcu and Henry, Hirschberg and Steen, J. Madsen and Andreas, Mandelis and Anita, Mahadevan-Jansen and Jansen, E. Duco, Eds. SPIE, 2010. pp. 754833.
File: 12.848384
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Just,
   author = {Just, T. and Lankenau, E. and Huttmann, G. and Pau, H. W.},
   title = {An optical coherence tomography study for imaging the round window niche and the promontorium tympani},
   editor = {Nikiforos, Kollias and Bernard, Choi and Haishan, Zeng and Reza, S. Malek and Brian, J. Wong and Justus, F. R. Ilgner and Kenton, W. Gregory and Guillermo, J. Tearney and Laura, Marcu and Henry, Hirschberg and Steen, J. Madsen and Andreas, Mandelis and Anita, Mahadevan-Jansen and Jansen, E. Duco},
   publisher = {SPIE},
   volume = {7548},
   pages = {754833},

}
Y. Xie, T. Bonin, S. Loeffler, G. Huettmann, V. Tronnier, and U. Hofmann,
Fiber spectral domain optical coherence tomography for in vivo rat brain imaging, Jurgen, Popp and Wolfgang, Drexler and Valery, V. Tuchin and Dennis, L. Matthews, Eds. SPIE, 2010. pp. 77152F.
File: 12.854798
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Xie,
   author = {Xie, Y. and Bonin, T. and Loeffler, S. and Huettmann, G. and Tronnier, V. and Hofmann, U. G.},
   title = {Fiber spectral domain optical coherence tomography for in vivo rat brain imaging},
   editor = {Jurgen, Popp and Wolfgang, Drexler and Valery, V. Tuchin and Dennis, L. Matthews},
   publisher = {SPIE},
   volume = {7715},
   pages = {77152F},
year = { 2010},
URL = { https://doi.org/10.1117/12.854798}

}
R. Orzekowsky-Schroeder, A. Klinger, A. Schuth, S. Freidank, A. Gebert, and A. Vogel,
Intravital real-time study of tissue response to controlled laser-induced cavitation using 500-ps UV laser pulses focused in murine gut mucosa under online dosimetry and spectrally resolved 2-photon microscopy, Daniel, L. Farkas and Dan, V. Nicolau and Robert, C. Leif, Eds. SPIE, 2010. pp. 756815.
File: 12.843102
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Orzekowsky2010,
   author = {Orzekowsky-Schroeder, Regina and Klinger, Antje and Schuth, Anna and Freidank, Sebastian and Huttmann, Gereon and Gebert, Andreas and Vogel, Alfred},
   title = {Intravital real-time study of tissue response to controlled laser-induced cavitation using 500-ps UV laser pulses focused in murine gut mucosa under online dosimetry and spectrally resolved 2-photon microscopy},
   editor = {Daniel, L. Farkas and Dan, V. Nicolau and Robert, C. Leif},
   publisher = {SPIE},
   volume = {7568},
   pages = {756815},
url = { https://doi.org/10.1117/12.843102},
year = { 2010}

}
M. Mueller, C. Schulz-Wackerbarth, P. Steven, E. Lankenau, T. Bonin, H. Mueller, A. Brueggemann, S. Grisanti, and G. Huettmann,
Slit-lamp-adapted fourier-domain OCT for anterior and posterior segments: preliminary results and comparison to time-domain OCT, Curr Eye Res , vol. 35(8), pp. 722-32, 2010.
DOI: 10.3109/02713683.2010.481069
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Müller-2010,
   author = {Mueller, M. and Schulz-Wackerbarth, C. and Steven, P. and Lankenau, E. and Bonin, T. and Mueller, H. and Brueggemann, A. and Birngruber, R. and Grisanti, S. and Huettmann, G.},
   title = {Slit-lamp-adapted fourier-domain OCT for anterior and posterior segments: preliminary results and comparison to time-domain OCT},
   journal = {Curr Eye Res},
   volume = {35(8)},
 DOI = { 10.3109/02713683.2010.481069},
year = { 2010},
   pages = {722-32},
   note = {Using Smart Source Parsing
Aug},
   abstract = {PURPOSE: To evaluate the diagnostic potential of a slit-lamp (SL)-adapted Fourier-domain (= spectral radar, SR) optical coherence tomography (OCT)-SL-SR-OCT-instrument as an in vivo imaging device for use in examinations of the anterior and posterior segments. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a pilot study, 88 eyes from 70 healthy volunteers and patients were examined using a prototype Fourier-domain SL-SR-OCT system. Results were compared to those from the following commercially available systems: the 1310-nm SL-OCT (Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) for anterior segment and the Stratus OCT (Zeiss Meditec, Jena, Germany) for posterior segment imaging. Our SL-SR-OCT provides 1025 axial scans, 5000 Hz line-scan frequency, scan length of up to 8 mm, axial depth in air of 3.5 mm, and resolution of 9 mum. For posterior visualization, a hand-held 78-diopter ophthalmoscopic lens was used. RESULTS: Our SL-SR-OCT system allowed simultaneous scanning with direct biomicroscopic and SL imaging of anterior and posterior segment structures. Anatomical structures and pathological changes were displayed with high resolution and excellent contrast. Measurements of corneal and retinal thickness were possible. In comparison to images obtained by the SL-OCT, our SL-SR-OCT boasted a higher resolution, thus providing more clinically relevant details of the corneal epithelium, internal structure of filtering blebs, etc. Complete imaging of the chamber angle was limited, however, due to the backscattering properties of the sclera at 830 nm. For posterior segment imaging, excellent delineation of the macula and optic nerve head details, with a distinct portrayal of macular pathology and retinal edema, was possible with SL-SR-OCT. CONCLUSION: SL-SR-OCT enables detailed imaging of physiological and pathological anterior and posterior segment structures. As a multi-purpose device, it offers a wide spectrum of applications, with high-quality OCT-imaging, in a comfortable setting without the need to move the patient.},
  
}
Y. Miura, A. Klettner, B. Noelle, H. Hasselbach, and J. Roider,
Change of morphological and functional characteristics of retinal pigment epithelium cells during cultivation of retinal pigment epithelium-choroid perfusion tissue culture, Ophthalmic Res , vol. 43, no. 3, pp. 122-33, 2010.
DOI:10.1159/000252979
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Miura2010,
   author = {Miura, Y. and Klettner, A. and Noelle, B. and Hasselbach, H. and Roider, J.},
   title = {Change of morphological and functional characteristics of retinal pigment epithelium cells during cultivation of retinal pigment epithelium-choroid perfusion tissue culture},
   journal = {Ophthalmic Res},
   volume = {43},
   number = {3},
   pages = {122-33},
   note = {1423-0259
Miura, Yoko
Klettner, Alexa
Noelle, Bernhard
Hasselbach, Heike
Roider, Johann
Journal Article
Switzerland
Ophthalmic Res. 2010;43(3):122-33. doi: 10.1159/000252979. Epub 2009 Oct 29.},
   abstract = {AIMS: To evaluate the changes of morphological and functional characteristics of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid perfusion culture during cultivation. METHODS: PorcineRPE-choroid tissue was cultivated in a perfusion tissue culture system. After the indicated times, histology, immunolocalization of collagen IV and von Willebrand factor, RPE cell viability with calcein-AM, TUNEL assay and occludin immunolocalization of RPE cells were examined. The tissue was treated with selective RPE treatment laser after different time periods and the wound healing response was characterized. Vascular endothelial growth factor secretion was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: On day 8, prominent morphological degenerative changes of RPE cells were observed in histology. According to the immunohistochemistry for collagen IV, the Bruch's membrane did not display any obvious decomposition until day 8. Von Willebrand factor staining decreased during cultivation, especially at the choriocapillaris. Calcein-AM staining and TUNEL assay displayed the increase of apoptotic changes in only a minority of the cells on day 4, but in many cells on day 8. Occludin delocalization was observed on day 8. Selective RPE treatment laser-produced wounds were completely closed by monolayer RPE when wounded on fresh and 3-day-old cultures, but not when wounded on 6-day-old cultures. Vascular endothelial growth factor secretion was stable between days 2 and 5, but increased after that. CONCLUSION: Under the stated culture perfusion conditions, porcine RPE-choroid tissue was suitable for experimentation up to 5 days of maintenance.},
   keywords = {Animals
*Apoptosis
Bruch Membrane/pathology
Cell Survival
Choroid/metabolism/*pathology/surgery
Collagen Type IV/metabolism
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Fluoresceins/metabolism
Immunoenzyme Techniques
In Situ Nick-End Labeling
Laser Therapy
Membrane Proteins/metabolism
Occludin
Organ Culture Techniques
Retinal Pigment Epithelium/metabolism/*pathology/surgery
Swine
Time Factors
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/metabolism
Wound Healing
von Willebrand Factor/metabolism},
   ISSN = {0030-3747},
   DOI = { 10.1159/000252979},
   year = {2010},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
J. Roider, S. Liew, C. Klatt, H. Elsner, E. Poerksen, and J. Hillenkamp,
Selective retina therapy (SRT) for clinically significant diabetic macular edema, Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol , vol. 248, no. 9, pp. 1263-72, 2010.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Roider,
   author = {Roider, J. and Liew, S. H. and Klatt, C. and Elsner, H. and Poerksen, E. and Hillenkamp, J. and Brinkmann, R. and Birngruber, R.},
   title = {Selective retina therapy (SRT) for clinically significant diabetic macular edema},
   journal = {Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol},
   volume = {248},
   number = {9},
   pages = {1263-72},
   note = {Using Smart Source Parsing
Sep},
   abstract = {PURPOSE: To test selective retina therapy (SRT) as a treatment of clinically significant diabetic macular edema (DME). METHODS: Prospective two-center interventional uncontrolled phase II pilot study. Thirty-nine eyes of 39 patients with previously untreated non-ischemic DME were treated with focal laser treatment using a Q-switched frequency doubled Nd:YLF laser which selectively affects the retinal pigment epithelium while sparing the photoreceptor layer. Optoacoustic measurements, fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA), and funduscopy were used to determine the individual threshold of RPE damage of each patient. The pulse energy was adjusted to apply angiographically visible but funduscopically invisible effects. Optoacoustic measurements were correlated with funduscopy and FFA. Follow-up examinations at 3 and 6 months post-treatment included best-corrected ETDRS visual acuity (BCVA), FFA, fundus photography, and retinal thickness measured by optical coherence tomography. The primary outcome measure was change of BCVA. Other outcome measures were change of retinal thickness, presence of hard exudates, leakage in FFA, accuracy of optoacoustic measurements, and correlation of BCVA with change of anatomical and systemic parameters. RESULTS: Mean BCVA improved from 43.7 letters (standard deviation, SD=9.1) at baseline to 46.1 letters (SD=10.5) at the 6-month follow-up (p=0.02). BCVA improved (>5 letters) or remained stable (+/-5 letters) in 84% of eyes. Thirteen percent of eyes improved by > or =10 letters, while 16% of eyes lost more than 5 letters. There was no severe loss of vision (> or =15 letters). Overall, retinal thickness, hard exudates, and leakage in FFA did not change significantly (p> 0.05), while improvement of BCVA correlated with a reduction of hard exudates (p=0.01) and central retinal thickness (p=0.01). Specificity and sensitivity of detecting the angiographic visible threshold of RPE damage by optoacoustic measurements were 86% and 70% respectively. No adverse effects or pain were noted during or after treatment. Conclusions Functional and anatomical improvement or stabilization was observed in most patients. SRT appears to be safe. Optoacoustic measurements accurately detect the individual threshold of RPE damage. A randomized trial is required to further test efficacy and safety of SRT as a treatment of clinically significant diabetic macular edema (DME).},
   year = {2010}
}
J. Probst, D. Hillmann, E. Lankenau, S. Oelckers, and P. Koch,
Optical coherence tomography with online visualization of more than seven rendered volumes per second, Journal of Biomedical Optics , vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 026014, 2010.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Probst2010,
   author = {Probst, Joachim and Hillmann, Dierck and Lankenau, Eva and Winter, Christan and Oelckers, Stefan and Koch, Peter and Huttmann, Gereon},
   title = {Optical coherence tomography with online visualization of more than seven rendered volumes per second},
   journal = {Journal of Biomedical Optics},
   volume = {15},
   number = {2},
   pages = {026014},
   keywords = {image resolution
medical image processing
optical tomography
rendering (computer graphics)
surgery},
   year = {2010}
}
Y. Miura, A. Klettner, and J. Roider,
VEGF antagonists decrease barrier function of retinal pigment epithelium in vitro: possible participation of intracellular glutathione, Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci , vol. 51, no. 9, pp. 4848-55, 2010.
DOI:10.1167/iovs.09-4699
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Miura2010,
   author = {Miura, Y and Klettner, A and Roider, J},
   title = {VEGF antagonists decrease barrier function of retinal pigment epithelium in vitro: possible participation of intracellular glutathione},
   journal = {Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci},
   volume = {51},
   number = {9},
   pages = {4848-55},
   note = {Miura, Yoko
Klettner, Alexa
Roider, Johann
United States
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2010 Sep;51(9):4848-55. Epub 2010 Apr 30.},
   abstract = {PURPOSE: To investigate the influence of VEGF antagonists on the barrier function of the retinal pigment epithelium and underlying mechanisms. METHODS: Porcine RPE cells were cultured on six-well membrane inserts. The cells were exposed to bevacizumab (62.5 microg/mL) or ranibizumab (25 microg/mL) for 24 hours (short term) or 9 days (long term). Transepithelial flux of FITC-dextran and intracellular levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) at normal and low-glucose conditions were investigated at different points in time. The influence of the addition of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) was investigated. The effect of GSH depletion on RPE permeability was examined using L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), a gamma-glutamylcysteine synthethase inhibitor. RESULTS: After short-term exposure, VEGF antagonists increased the transepithelial flux of FITC-dextran significantly on day 2. Bevacizumab, but not ranibizumab, increased permeability up to 9 days. Under long-term exposure, both drugs enhanced permeability for 7 days; bevacizumab had the stronger effect. The addition of TA inhibited this increase. At the ninth day of short- and long-term exposure, bevacizumab-exposed cells, but not ranibizumab-exposed cells, exhibited a significantly lower GSH level. In the low-glucose condition, both drugs accelerated the decrease of intracellular GSH for the first 48 hours. GSH depletion increased the permeability of retinal pigment epithelium. TA had no effect on BSO-induced GSH depletion. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that bevacizumab and ranibizumab may decrease RPE barrier function, with bevacizumab exhibiting a prolonged and more profound effect. Combination with TA is thought to be beneficial because of its protective effect on stabilizing RPE junctional integrity.},
   keywords = {Angiogenesis Inhibitors/ pharmacology
Animals
Antibodies, Monoclonal/ pharmacology
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized
Buthionine Sulfoximine/pharmacology
Cell Membrane Permeability/drug effects
Cells, Cultured
Dextrans/pharmacokinetics
Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology
Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate/analogs & derivatives/pharmacokinetics
Glucose/pharmacology
Glutathione/ metabolism
Retinal Pigment Epithelium/cytology/ drug effects/ metabolism
Swine
Tight Junctions/drug effects/metabolism
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/ antagonists & inhibitors/metabolis
AutoPhoN},
   ISSN = {1552-5783 (Electronic)
0146-0404 (Linking)},
   DOI = {10.1167/iovs.09-4699},
   year = { 2010},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
R. Rahmanzadeh, P. Rai, J. Gerdes, and T. Hasan,
Targeted light-inactivation of the Ki-67 protein using theranostic liposomes leads to death of proliferating cells, Samuel, Achilefu and Ramesh, Raghavachari, Eds. SPIE, 2010. pp. 757602.
DOI:10.1117/12.843850
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Rahmanzadeh,
   author = {Rahmanzadeh, Ramtin and Rai, Prakash and Gerdes, Johannes and Hasan, Tayyaba},
   title = {Targeted light-inactivation of the Ki-67 protein using theranostic liposomes leads to death of proliferating cells},
   editor = {Samuel, Achilefu and Ramesh, Raghavachari},
   publisher = {SPIE},
   volume = {7576},
   pages = {757602},
year = {2010},
doi ={10.1117/12.843850},
keywords = {Nanotechnology, Ovarian Cancer, Proliferative Index, Photodynamic Therapy,Antibody}

}
Y. Miura, R. Orzekowsky-Schröder, N. Koop, P. Steven, M. Szaszák, and R. Brinkmann,
Appearance of autofluorescence in RPE cells at the rim of photocoagulation, in FLIM 2010 - Symposium "Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of the Human Retina" , 2010.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Miura2010,
   author = {Miura, Y and Huettmann, G and Orzekowsky-Schroeder, R and Steven, P and Szaszák, M and Koop, N and Brinkmann, R},
   title = {Appearance of autofluorescence in RPE cells at the rim of photocoagulation},
   booktitle = {FLIM 2010 - Symposium "Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of the Human Retina"},
   type = {Conference Proceedings},
Year = { 2010}
}


P. Rai, S. Mallidi, X. Zheng, R. Rahmanzadeh, Y. Mir, S. Elrington, A. Khurshid, and T. Hasan,
Development and applications of photo-triggered theranostic agents, Adv Drug Deliv Rev , vol. 62, no. 11, pp. 1094-124, 2010. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addr.2010.09.002 .
Weblink: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addr.2010.09.002
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Rai,
   author = {Rai, P. and Mallidi, S. and Zheng, X. and Rahmanzadeh, R. and Mir, Y. and Elrington, S. and Khurshid, A. and Hasan, T.},
   title = {Development and applications of photo-triggered theranostic agents},
   journal = {Adv Drug Deliv Rev},
   volume = {62},
   number = {11},
   pages = {1094-124},
   note = {Rai, Prakash
Mallidi, Srivalleesha
Zheng, Xiang
Rahmanzadeh, Ramtin
Mir, Youssef
Elrington, Stefan
Khurshid, Ahmat
Hasan, Tayyaba
Nihms238162
Adv Drug Deliv Rev. 2010 Aug 30;62(11):1094-124. Epub 2010 Sep 19.},
   abstract = {Theranostics, the fusion of therapy and diagnostics for optimizing efficacy and safety of therapeutic regimes, is a growing field that is paving the way towards the goal of personalized medicine for the benefit of patients. The use of light as a remote-activation mechanism for drug delivery has received increased attention due to its advantages in highly specific spatial and temporal control of compound release. Photo-triggered theranostic constructs could facilitate an entirely new category of clinical solutions which permit early recognition of the disease by enhancing contrast in various imaging modalities followed by the tailored guidance of therapy. Finally, such theranostic agents could aid imaging modalities in monitoring response to therapy. This article reviews recent developments in the use of light-triggered theranostic agents for simultaneous imaging and photoactivation of therapeutic agents. Specifically, we discuss recent developments in the use of theranostic agents for photodynamic-, photothermal- or photo-triggered chemotherapy for several diseases.},
   keywords = {Animals
Anti-Infective Agents/diagnostic use/therapeutic use
Antineoplastic Agents/diagnostic use/therapeutic use
Diagnostic Imaging/ methods
Drug Carriers/diagnostic use/therapeutic use
Humans
Infection/ diagnosis/ drug therapy
Nanoparticles/diagnostic use/therapeutic use
Neoplasms/ diagnosis/drug therapy/ therapy
Phototherapy/ methods},
   year = {2010}
}

C. Framme, and G. Panagakis,
Effects on Choroidal Neovascularization after Anti-VEGF Upload Using Intravitreal Ranibizumab, as Determined by Spectral Domain-Optical Coherence Tomography, Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science , vol. 51, no. 3, pp. 1671-1676, 2010.
DOI:Doi 10.1167/Iovs.09-4496
File: WOS:000275164300060
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Framme2010,
   author = {Framme, C. and Panagakis, G. and Birngruber, R.},
   title = {Effects on Choroidal Neovascularization after Anti-VEGF Upload Using Intravitreal Ranibizumab, as Determined by Spectral Domain-Optical Coherence Tomography},
   journal = {Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science},
   volume = {51},
   number = {3},
   pages = {1671-1676},
   note = {563VW
Times Cited:18
Cited References Count:17},
   abstract = {PURPOSE. It is unclear whether anti-VEGF monotherapy in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) achieves morphologic CNV regression or only stops further CNV growth. In this study, spectral domain-optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was used to image CNV structure before and after anti-VEGF treatment.
METHODS. Out of 107 consecutive patients, a prospective CNV evaluation was possible in 78 of them. Newly diagnosed CNV (classic CNV: n = 16; occult CNV: n = 54; minimal classic CNV: n = 8) due to AMD was imaged before and 4 weeks after anti-VEGF upload in three intravitreal injections of ranibizumab. Qualitative (structural changes) and quantitative measurements (diameter and thickness) of the CNV were obtained from the OCT images.
RESULTS. Classic CNV components were observed above the RPE/photoreceptor complex, whereas occult CNVs stayed below. Of all postoperative OCTs, 59% revealed complete dry retinal structures, 27% showed reduced edema, and 14% showed edema remaining unchanged. Mean macular thickness decreased significantly from 427 to 303 mu m (P = 0.000). Qualitatively, overall CNV architecture appeared to be unchanged in 78%, was reduced in thickness in 18%, and became larger in 4%. Quantitatively, in all CNV subtypes, the diameter of the CNV lesions (preoperative, 2813 mu m; postoperative, 2804 mu m) did not change after treatment (classic CNV: P = 0.390; occult CNV: P = 0.405, minimal classic CNV: P = 0.092) independent of postoperative retinal edema. The overall thickness of the lesion, however, was reduced from 205 to 175 mu m (P = 0.000). Thickness reduction was significantly enhanced especially in CNV with classic components (n = 24; 252 to 197 mu m; P = 0.000; reduction, 22%), whereas reduction was smaller but also significant in occult CNV (183 to 164 mu m; P = 0.003; reduction, 10%).
CONCLUSIONS. With SD-OCT, CNV size can be two-dimensionally determined and followed up after intravitreal anti-VEGF treatment. In only 4% of CNV was enlargement observed, whereas in 78%, CNV architecture appeared qualitatively unchanged, independent of retinal edema. Quantitative measurements underlined stable CNV diameters for all subtypes but revealed significant reduction of thickness especially for classic CNV components. In this series, ranibizumab monotherapy was able to morphologically stop further CNV growth but, in most patients, did not lead to a major regression of CNV, especially of its occult components. (Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2010;51:1671-1676) DOI:10.1167/iovs.09-4496},
   keywords = {macular degeneration
therapy
verteporfin
oct},
   ISSN = {0146-0404},
   DOI = {Doi 10.1167/Iovs.09-4496},
   url = {<Go to ISI>://WOS:000275164300060},
   year = {2010},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
T. Bonin, G. Franke, M. Hagen-Eggert, and P. Koch,
In vivo Fourier-domain full-field OCT of the human retina with 1.5 million A-lines/s., .... Opt Lett. 2010 Oct 15;35(20):3432-4. doi: 10.1364/OL.35.003432., 2010.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@book{Bonin2010,
   author = {Bonin, T. and Franke, G. and Hagen-Eggert, M. and Koch, P. and Huttmann, G.},
   title = {In vivo Fourier-domain full-field OCT of the human retina with 1.5 million A-lines/s},
   publisher = {Opt Lett. 2010 Oct 15;35(20):3432-4. doi: 10.1364/OL.35.003432.},
   abstract = {In vivo full-field (FF) optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of human retina are presented by using a rapidly tunable laser source in combination with an ultra-high-speed camera. Fourier-domain FF-OCT provided a way to increase the speed of retinal imaging by parallel acquisition of A-scans. Reduced contrast caused by cross talk was observed only below the retinal pigment epithelium. With a 100Hz sweep rate, FF-OCT was fast enough to acquire OCT images with acceptable motion artifacts. FF-OCT allows ultrafast retinal imaging, boosting image speed by a lack of moving parts and a considerably higher irradiation power.},
  year={2010}
}
P. Prahs, A. Walter, R. Regler, and C. Framme,
Selective retina therapy (SRT) in patients with geographic atrophy due to age-related macular degeneration, Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol , vol. 248, no. 5, pp. 651--8, 2010.
DOI:10.1007/s00417-009-1208-1
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Prahs2010,
   title        = {Selective retina therapy (SRT) in patients with geographic atrophy due to age-related macular degeneration},
   author       = {Prahs, P. and Walter, A. and Regler, R. and Theisen-Kunde, D. and Birngruber, R. and Brinkmann, R. and Framme, C.},
   year         = 2010,
   journal      = {Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol},
   volume       = 248,
   number       = 5,
   pages        = {651--8},
   doi          = {10.1007/s00417-009-1208-1},
   issn         = {0721-832x},
   note         = {1435-702x Prahs, Philipp Walter, Andreas Regler, Roman Theisen-Kunde, Dirk Birngruber, Reginald Brinkmann, Ralf Framme, Carsten Journal Article Germany Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2010 May;248(5):651-8. doi: 10.1007/s00417-009-1208-1. Epub 2009 Dec 22.},
   abstract     = {BACKGROUND: For geographic atrophy (GA) due to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) there is so far no approved treatment option. Usually, increased autofluorescence (AF) levels of different patterns adjacent to the atrophic area indicate lipofuscin-laden retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells at a high risk for apoptosis. Herein, SRT was used to selectively treat these cells to stimulate RPE proliferation, in order to reduce or ideally stop further growth of the atrophic area. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Six eyes of six patients with bilateral equally pronounced GA were treated by SRT, while the fellow eye served as control. Irradiation was performed using a prototype SRT laser (Medical Laser Center Lubeck, Nd:YLF laser; 527 nm; 200 ns/1.7 micros pulse duration; 30 repetitive pulses at 100 Hz). Test lesions with increasing energies were applied at the lower vessel arcade to determine the individual angiographic and ophthalmoscopic threshold radiant exposures. Treatment was then performed in the area of increased AF adjacent to the GA using energies between both thresholds. The GA progression rates of treated and fellow eyes were evaluated. RESULTS: After a 1-year follow-up, a progression of the atrophic area was observed in the treated eyes (0.7-8.0 mm(2)/yr, mean 3.0 mm(2)/yr; 46%/yr) whereas the progression rates of the fellow eyes were insignificantly lower (0.46-4.04 mm(2)/yr, mean 1.9 mm(2)/yr; 30%/yr; p = 0.134). The progression rate in the treated eyes of two patients increased significantly, while in the other four patients, the progression rates were nearly the same between both eyes. Moreover, one of these two eyes showed an unexpected RPE reaction after treatment, since all laser lesions led to RPE atrophy and thus an accelerated enlargement of the GA occurred. CONCLUSION: SRT in the hyperautofluorescent areas of GA was not able to stop or slow down the progression of GA. However, modified treatment strategies might be more promising, e.g. placing the spots outside the hyperautofluorescent areas where RPE apoptosis is postulated. Moreover, SRT studies on GA might be more successfully performed on specific subgroups of GA, based on autofluorescence and other findings.},
   keywords     = {Aged Aged, 80 and over Disease Progression Fluorescein Angiography Fluorescence Follow-Up Studies Geographic Atrophy/etiology/physiopathology/*surgery Humans Image Processing, Computer-Assisted *Laser Coagulation Lasers, Solid-State/therapeutic use Lipofuscin/metabolism Macular Degeneration/complications/physiopathology/*surgery Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures/*methods Pilot Projects Prognosis Retinal Pigment Epithelium/metabolism},
   type         = {Journal Article}
}
R. Rahmanzadeh, P. Rai, J. Celli, I. Rizvi, B. Baron-Luhr, J. Gerdes, and T. Hasan,
Ki-67 as a molecular target for therapy in an in vitro three-dimensional model for ovarian cancer, Cancer Res , vol. 70, no. 22, pp. 9234-42, 2010.
DOI:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-10-1190
Weblink: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addr.2010.09.002
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Rahmanzadeh2010,
   author = {Rahmanzadeh, R. and Rai, P. and Celli, J. P. and Rizvi, I. and Baron-Luhr, B. and Gerdes, J. and Hasan, T.},
   title = {Ki-67 as a molecular target for therapy in an in vitro three-dimensional model for ovarian cancer},
   journal = {Cancer Res},
   volume = {70},
   number = {22},
   pages = {9234-42},
   note = {Using Smart Source Parsing
Nov 15; Epub 2010 Nov 2},
   abstract = {Targeting molecular markers and pathways implicated in cancer cell growth is a promising avenue for developing effective therapies. Although the Ki-67 protein (pKi-67) is a key marker associated with aggressively proliferating cancer cells and poor prognosis, its full potential as a therapeutic target has never before been successfully shown. In this regard, its nuclear localization presents a major hurdle because of the need for intracellular and intranuclear delivery of targeting and therapeutic moieties. Using a liposomally encapsulated construct, we show for the first time the specific delivery of a Ki-67-directed antibody and subsequent light-triggered death in the human ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR-5. Photoimmunoconjugate-encapsulating liposomes (PICEL) were constructed from anti-pKi-67 antibodies conjugated to fluorescein 5(6)-isothiocyanate, as a photoactivatable agent, followed by encapsulation in noncationic liposomes. Nucleolar localization of the PICELs was confirmed by confocal imaging. Photodynamic activation with PICELs specifically killed pKi-67-positive cancer cells both in monolayer and in three-dimensional (3D) cultures of OVCAR-5 cells, with the antibody TuBB-9 targeting a physiologically active form of pKi-67 but not with MIB-1, directed to a different epitope. This is the first demonstration of (a) the exploitation of Ki-67 as a molecular target for therapy and (b) specific delivery of an antibody to the nucleolus in monolayer cancer cells and in an in vitro 3D model system. In view of the ubiquity of pKi-67 in proliferating cells in cancer and the specificity of targeting in 3D multicellular acini, these findings are promising and the approach merits further investigation.},
   year = {2010}
}
T. Just, E. Lankenau, F. Prall, H. Pau, and K. Sommer,
Optical coherence tomography allows for the reliable identification of laryngeal epithelial dysplasia and for precise biopsy: a clinicopathological study of 61 patients undergoing microlaryngoscopy, Laryngoscope , vol. 120, no. 10, pp. 1964-70, 2010.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Just,
   author = {Just, T. and Lankenau, E. and Prall, F. and Huttmann, G. and Pau, H. W. and Sommer, K.},
   title = {Optical coherence tomography allows for the reliable identification of laryngeal epithelial dysplasia and for precise biopsy: a clinicopathological study of 61 patients undergoing microlaryngoscopy},
   journal = {Laryngoscope},
   volume = {120},
   number = {10},
   pages = {1964-70},
   note = {Just, Tino
Lankenau, Eva
Prall, Friedrich
Huttmann, Gereon
Pau, Hans Wilhelm
Sommer, Konrad
Laryngoscope. 2010 Oct;120(10):1964-70.},
   abstract = {OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: A newly developed microscope-based spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) device and an endoscope-based time-domain OCT (TD-OCT) were used to assess the inter-rater reliability, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of benign and dysplastic laryngeal epithelial lesions. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study. METHODS: OCT during microlaryngoscopy was done on 35 patients with an endoscope-based TD-OCT, and on 26 patients by an SD-OCT system integrated into an operating microscope. Biopsies were taken from microscopically suspicious lesions allowing comparative study of OCT images and histology. RESULTS: Thickness of the epithelium was seen to be the main criterion for degree of dysplasia. The inter-rater reliability for two observers was found to be kappa = 0.74 (P <.001) for OCT. OCT provided test outcomes for differentiation between benign laryngeal lesions and dysplasia/CIS with sensitivity of 88%, specificity of 89%, PPV of 85%, NPV of 91%, and predictive accuracy of 88%. However, because of the limited penetration depth of the laser light primarily in hyperkeratotic lesions (thickness above 1.5 mm), the basal cell layer was no longer visible, precluding reliable assessment of such lesions. CONCLUSIONS: OCT allows for a fairly accurate assessment of benign and dysplastic laryngeal epithelial lesion and greatly facilitates the taking of precise biopsies. Laryngoscope, 2010.},
   keywords = {Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Biopsy
Female
Humans
Laryngeal Diseases/*pathology
Laryngoscopy/*methods
Male
Middle Aged
Precancerous Conditions/*pathology
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and Specificity
*Tomography, Optical Coherence},
   year = {2010}
}
R. Bombien, C. Lesche, L. Lozonschi, M. Feucker, C. Dahmen, M. Schunke, J. Cremer, and G. Lutter,
Percutaneous Aortic Valve Replacement: Emerging Tractability for Sufficient Intracardiac Resection of the Aortic Valve, Innovations (Phila) , vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 55-59, 2010.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Bombien,
   author = {Bombien, R. and Lesche, C. and Lozonschi, L. and Feucker, M. and Brinkmann, R. and Dahmen, C. and Schunke, M. and Cremer, J. and Lutter, G.},
   title = {Percutaneous Aortic Valve Replacement: Emerging Tractability for Sufficient Intracardiac Resection of the Aortic Valve},
   journal = {Innovations (Phila)},
   volume = {5},
   number = {1},
   pages = {55-59},
   note = {Philadelphia, Pa.
Innovations (Phila). 2010 Jan;5(1):55-59.},
   abstract = {OBJECTIVE:: The feasibility of endovascular resection of highly calcified aortic valves has already been demonstrated by our group. Different endovascular and intracardiac tractability methods were applied. In this study, these technologies were analyzed comparing the tractability, the resection time, and the lesions in the surrounding tissue. METHODS:: All aortic valve resections (seven human hearts and 21 porcine hearts) were performed using a Thulium:YAG laser (continuous wave, wavelength of 2.01 mum, 20 watts power rating). In the first resection system, the laser fiber was controlled by a free in-lying flexible endoscope (O 2.5 mm, length of 600 mm). The distal part of the endoscope (40 mm) was moved in one plane by proximal manual control (three degrees of freedom). The resection system was separated into defined rooms assigning one room for one tool. The fiber was controlled by the above-mentioned endoscope (*) (three degrees of freedom). The third resection system was a mechanical microactuator carrying the laser fiber (three degrees of freedom). The fourth resection system contains a rotatable inlay with defined rooms and a newly designed nitinol (NiTi) microactuator that controlled the laser fiber (four degrees of freedom). The resection time per leaflet was measured in minutes. Gross anatomy and histology in the surrounding tissue were evaluated. RESULTS:: The resection time in approaches 1, 2, 3, and 4 was 5.5 +/- 2.3 minutes, 7.4 +/- 2.7 minutes, +/- 6.6 minutes, and2.3 +/- 1.2 minutes, respectively. The gross anatomy and histology of collateral damages revealed only superficial lesions of the surrounding tissue. The amount of lesions and the resection time were lower in the fourth approach with four degrees of freedom. CONCLUSIONS:: This analysis demonstrated that a precise tractability with four degrees of freedom is necessary for a faster and safer endovascular resection of the aortic valve. The analysis will help to optimize the ongoing development of the endovascular and intracardiac resection technology.},
   year = {2010}
}
M. Wiesner, J. Ihlemann, H. Muller, and E. Lankenau,
Optical coherence tomography for process control of laser micromachining, Rev Sci Instrum , vol. 81, no. 3, pp. 033705, 2010.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Wiesner2010,
   author = {Wiesner, M. and Ihlemann, J. and Muller, H. H. and Lankenau, E. and Huttmann, G.},
   title = {Optical coherence tomography for process control of laser micromachining},
   journal = {Rev Sci Instrum},
   volume = {81},
   number = {3},
   pages = {033705},
   note = {Using Smart Source Parsing
Mar},
   abstract = {In situ surface imaging for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) by optical coherence tomography (OCT) before, during, and after ablative laser processing is presented. Furthermore, it is shown that the ability of in situ characterization is beneficial for samples such as optical fibers, which are difficult to handle in the standard analysis. Surface images taken by the OCT are compared with these common analysis tools such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), reflected-light, and confocal microscopy. An axial resolution of approximately 126 nm for surface detection and a lateral resolution <2.5 microm are obtained and the potential of the setup to imaging structures with high aspect ratio is demonstrated.},
   year = {2010}
}

2009

C. Jirauschek, B. Biedermann, and R. Huber,
A theoretical description of Fourier domain mode locked lasers, Opt. Express , vol. 17, no. 26, pp. 24013-24019, Dec. 2009. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OE.17.024013
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Jirauschek:09,
author = {Christian Jirauschek and Benjamin Biedermann and Robert Huber},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Laser theory; Lasers, tunable; Optical coherence tomography; Fourier domain mode locking; Laser modes; Laser sources; Mode locking; Optical amplifiers; Spontaneous emission},
number = {26},
pages = {24013--24019},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {A theoretical description of Fourier domain mode locked lasers},
volume = {17},
month = {Dec},
year = {2009},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-17-26-24013},
doi = {10.1364/OE.17.024013},
abstract = {The first theoretical model of Fourier domain mode locking operation is presented. A specially tailored dynamic equation in a moving spectral reference frame is derived, enabling efficient numerical treatment, despite the broad laser spectrum and the extremely long cavity. The excellent agreement of the presented theory with experiment over a wide range of operation parameters enables a quantitative assessment of the relevant physical effects, such as the spectral loss modulation and gain saturation dynamics, amplified spontaneous emission, linewidth enhancement, and self-phase modulation.},
}
W. Wieser, B. Biedermann, T. Klein, C. Eigenwillig, and R. Huber,
Ultra-rapid dispersion measurement in optical fibers, Opt. Express , vol. 17, no. 25, pp. 22871-22878, Dec. 2009. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OE.17.022871
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Wieser:09,
author = {Wolfgang Wieser and Benjamin R. Biedermann and Thomas Klein and Christoph M. Eigenwillig and Robert Huber},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Fiber characterization; Fiber properties; Fibers, single-mode; Optical communications; Lasers, tunable; Dispersion; Optical standards and testing; Lasers, fiber; Fiber optic amplifiers; Laser modes; Laser sources; Mode locking; Optical networks; Thermal effects},
number = {25},
pages = {22871--22878},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Ultra-rapid dispersion measurement in optical fibers},
volume = {17},
month = {Dec},
year = {2009},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-17-25-22871},
doi = {10.1364/OE.17.022871},
abstract = {We present a novel method to measure the chromatic dispersion of fibers with lengths of several kilometers. The technique is based on a rapidly swept Fourier domain mode locked laser driven at 50kHz repetition rate. Amplitude modulation with 400MHz and phase analysis yield the dispersion values over a 130nm continuous wavelength tuning range covering C and L band. The high acquisition speed of 10{\textmu}s for individual wavelength-resolved traces $\Delta$t($\lambda$) can reduce effects caused by thermal drift and acoustic vibrations. It enables real-time monitoring with update rates \&gt;100Hz even when averaging several hundred acquisitions for improved accuracy.},
}
R. Huber,
Advances in Fourier domain OCT, in 2009 IEEE LEOS Annual Meeting Conference Proceedings , IEEE, Oct.2009. pp. 201-202.
DOI:10.1109/LEOS.2009.5343314
Bibtex: BibTeX
@INPROCEEDINGS{5343314,
  author={Huber, Robert},
  booktitle={2009 IEEE LEOS Annual Meeting Conference Proceedings}, 
  title={Advances in Fourier domain OCT}, 
  year={2009},
  volume={},
  number={},
  pages={201-202},
  abstract={In optical coherence tomography, the introduction of so called ldquoFrequency Domainrdquo techniques, i.e. spectrally resolved detection, had a dramatic impact on these biomedical imaging systems. The current status and future developments will be discussed.},
  keywords={},
  doi={10.1109/LEOS.2009.5343314},
  ISSN={1092-8081},
  month={Oct},}
C. Eigenwillig, B. Biedermann, W. Wieser, and R. Huber,
Wavelength swept amplified spontaneous emission source, Opt. Express , vol. 17, no. 21, pp. 18794-18807, Oct. 2009. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OE.17.018794
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Eigenwillig:09,
author = {Christoph M. Eigenwillig and Benjamin R. Biedermann and Wolfgang Wieser and Robert Huber},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Noise in imaging systems; Optical coherence tomography; Fabry-Perot; Filters; Interferometry; Lasers, tunable; Fiber Bragg grating sensors; Image quality; Light properties; Light sources; Medical imaging; Mode locking},
number = {21},
pages = {18794--18807},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Wavelength swept amplified spontaneous emission source},
volume = {17},
month = {Oct},
year = {2009},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-17-21-18794},
doi = {10.1364/OE.17.018794},
abstract = {We present a new, alternative approach to realize a wavelength swept light source with no fundamental limit to sweep speed. Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) light alternately passes a cascade of optical gain elements and tunable optical bandpass filters. We show that for high sweep speeds, the control signal for the different filters has to be applied with a defined, precise phase delay on the order of nanoseconds, to compensate for the light propagation time between the filters and ensure optimum operation. At a center wavelength of 1300 nm sweep rates of 10 kHz, 100 kHz and 340 kHz over a sweep range of 100 nm full width and an average power of 50 mW are demonstrated. For application in optical coherence tomography (OCT), an axial resolution of 12 {\textmu}m (air), a sensitivity of 120 dB (50 mW) and a dynamic range of 50 dB are achieved and OCT imaging is demonstrated. Performance parameters like coherence properties and relative intensity noise (RIN) are quantified, discussed and compared to the performance of Fourier Domain Mode Locked (FDML) lasers. Physical models for the observed difference in performance are provided.},
}
E. Ploetz, B. Marx, T. Klein, R. Huber, and P. Gilch,
A 75 MHz light source for femtosecond stimulated raman microscopy, Opt. Express , vol. 17, no. 21, pp. 18612-18620, Oct. 2009. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OE.17.018612
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Ploetz:09,
author = {E. Ploetz and B. Marx and T. Klein and R. Huber and P. Gilch},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Laser amplifiers; Ultrafast lasers; Nonlinear microscopy; Raman microscopy; Laser sources; Raman microscopy; Raman scattering; Raman spectroscopy; Stimulated Raman scattering; Time resolved spectroscopy},
number = {21},
pages = {18612--18620},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {A 75 MHz Light Source for Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Microscopy},
volume = {17},
month = {Oct},
year = {2009},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-17-21-18612},
doi = {10.1364/OE.17.018612},
abstract = {In femtosecond stimulated Raman microscopy (FSRM) a spectrally broad pulse (Raman probe) and a spectrally narrow pulse (Raman pump) interact in a sample and thereby generate a Raman spectrum of the focal volume. Here a novel light source for FSRM is presented. It consists of an 8-fs laser (repetition rate of 75 MHz) operating as Raman probe. A Yb3$+$ based fiber amplifier generates the Raman pump light at 980 nm. The amplifier is seeded by the spectral wing of the 8-fs laser output which ensures synchronisation of pump and probe pulses. Spectral and temporal characteristics of these pulses are reported and simultaneous recording of broadband Raman spectra relying on these pulses is demonstrated.},
}
R. Leonhardt, B. Biedermann, W. Wieser, and R. Huber,
Nonlinear optical frequency conversion of an amplified Fourier Domain Mode Locked (FDML) laser., Opt. Express , vol. 17, no. 19, pp. 16801-16808, 09 2009. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OE.17.016801
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Leonhardt:09,
author = {Rainer Leonhardt and Benjamin R. Biedermann and Wolfgang Wieser and Robert Huber},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Fiber optics amplifiers and oscillators; Fibers, erbium; Lasers, tunable; Nonlinear optics, fibers; Nonlinear optics, four-wave mixing; Wavelength conversion devices ; Four wave mixing; Fourier domain mode locking; Laser sources; Optical coherence tomography; Optical frequency conversion; Semiconductor optical amplifiers},
number = {19},
pages = {16801--16808},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Nonlinear optical frequency conversion of an amplified Fourier Domain Mode Locked (FDML) laser},
volume = {17},
month = {Sep},
year = {2009},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-17-19-16801},
doi = {10.1364/OE.17.016801},
abstract = {We report on the highly efficient non-linear optical frequency conversion of the wavelength swept output from a Fourier Domain Mode Locked (FDML) laser. Different concepts for power scaling of FDML lasers by post-amplification with active fibers are presented. A two-stage post-amplification of an FDML laser with an amplification factor of 300 up to a peak power of 1.5 W is used to supply sufficient power levels for non-linear conversion. Using a single-mode dispersion shifted fiber (DSF), we convert this amplified output that covers the region between 1541 nm and 1545 nm to a wavelength range from 1572 nm to 1663 nm via modulation instability (MI). For this four wave mixing process we observe an efficiency of ~40\%. The anti-Stokes signal between 1435 nm and 1516 nm was observed with lower conversion efficiency. In addition to shifting the wavelength, the effect of MI also enables a substantial increase in the wavelength sweep rate of the FDML laser by a factor of ~50 to 0.55 nm/ns.},
}
M. Gora, K. Karnowski, M. Szkulmowski, B. Kaluzny, R. Huber, A. Kowalczyk, and M. Wojtkowski,
Ultra high-speed swept source OCT imaging of the anterior segment of human eye at 200 kHz with adjustable imaging range, Opt. Express , vol. 17, no. 17, pp. 14880-14894, 08 2009. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OE.17.014880
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Gora:09,
author = {Michalina Gora and Karol Karnowski and Maciej Szkulmowski and Bartlomiej J. Kaluzny and Robert Huber and Andrzej Kowalczyk and Maciej Wojtkowski},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Optical coherence tomography; Lasers, tunable; Ophthalmology; Crystalline lens; High speed imaging; Imaging systems; Ophthalmic imaging; Optical coherence tomography; Three dimensional imaging},
number = {17},
pages = {14880--14894},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Ultra high-speed swept source OCT imaging of the anterior segment of human eye at 200 kHz with adjustable imaging range},
volume = {17},
month = {Aug},
year = {2009},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-17-17-14880},
doi = {10.1364/OE.17.014880},
abstract = {We present an application of in vivo anterior segment imaging of the human eye with an ultrahigh speed swept source OCT instrument. For this purpose, a dedicated OCT system was designed and constructed. This instrument enables axial zooming by automatic reconfiguration of spectral sweep range; an enhanced imaging range mode enables imaging of the entire anterior segment while a high axial resolution mode provides detailed morphological information of the chamber angle and the cornea. The speed of 200,000 lines/s enables high sampling density in three-dimensional imaging of the entire cornea in 250 ms promising future applications of OCT for optical corneal topography, pachymetry and elevation maps. The results of a preliminary quantitative corneal analysis based on OCT data free form motion artifacts are presented. Additionally, a volumetric and real time reconstruction of dynamic processes, like pupillary reaction to light stimulus or blink-induced contact lens movements are demonstrated.},
}
G. Palte, W. Wieser, B. Biedermann, C. Eigenwillig, and R. Huber,
Fourier domain mode locked (FDML) lasers for polarization sensitive OCT, in Optical Coherence Tomography and Coherence Techniques IV , Peter E. Andersen and Brett E. Bouma, Eds. SPIE, 072009. pp. 73720M.
DOI:10.1117/12.831835
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{10.1117/12.831835,
author = {Gesa Palte and Wolfgang Wieser and Benjamin R. Biedermann and Christoph M. Eigenwillig and Robert Huber},
title = {{Fourier domain mode locked (FDML) lasers for polarization sensitive OCT}},
volume = {7372},
booktitle = {Optical Coherence Tomography and Coherence Techniques IV},
editor = {Peter E. Andersen and Brett E. Bouma},
organization = {International Society for Optics and Photonics},
publisher = {SPIE},
pages = {73720M},
abstract = {A Fourier Domain mode-locked (FDML) laser for polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) is
presented. The laser generates an alternating sequence of wavelength sweeps with their polarization states 90&deg; separated
on the Poincare sphere.},
keywords = {Lasers, tunable, optical coherence tomography, lasers, imaging systems, polarization, fiber},
year = {2009},
doi = {10.1117/12.831835},
URL = {https://doi.org/10.1117/12.831835}
}
C. Eigenwillig, B. Biedermann, W. Wieser, and R. Huber,
Wavelength swept ASE source, in Optical Coherence Tomography and Coherence Techniques IV , Peter E. Andersen and Brett E. Bouma, Eds. SPIE, 072009. pp. 73720O.
DOI:10.1117/12.831831
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{10.1117/12.831831,
author = {Christoph M. Eigenwillig and Benjamin R. Biedermann and Wolfgang Wieser and Robert Huber},
title = {{Wavelength swept ASE source}},
volume = {7372},
booktitle = {Optical Coherence Tomography and Coherence Techniques IV},
editor = {Peter E. Andersen and Brett E. Bouma},
organization = {International Society for Optics and Photonics},
publisher = {SPIE},
pages = {73720O},
abstract = {We present a novel wavelength swept light source for Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Arbitrary sweep rates up
to 2x170kHz are achieved by phase-shifted control of two optical bandpass-filters to compensate light propagation
effects.},
keywords = {amplified spontaneous emission, tunable lasers, lasers, optical coherence tomography, optical frequency domain imaging},
year = {2009},
doi = {10.1117/12.831831},
URL = {https://doi.org/10.1117/12.831831}
}
B. Biedermann, W. Wieser, C. Eigenwillig, and R. Huber,
Recent developments in Fourier domain mode locked lasers for optical coherence tomography: imaging at 1310 nm vs. 1550 nm wavelength, Journal of Biophotonics , vol. 2, no. 6-7, pp. 357-363, 07 2009.
DOI:10.1002/jbio.200910028
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{https://doi.org/10.1002/jbio.200910028,
author = {Biedermann, Benjamin R. and Wieser, Wolfgang and Eigenwillig, Christoph M. and Huber, Robert},
title = {Recent developments in Fourier Domain Mode Locked lasers for optical coherence tomography: Imaging at 1310 nm vs. 1550 nm wavelength},
journal = {Journal of Biophotonics},
volume = {2},
number = {6-7},
pages = {357-363},
keywords = {optical coherence tomography, tunable lasers, Fourier domain mode locking, optical frequency domain imaging},
doi = {https://doi.org/10.1002/jbio.200910028},
url = {https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jbio.200910028},
eprint = {https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/jbio.200910028},
abstract = {Abstract We report on recent progress in Fourier domain mode-locking (FDML) technology. The paper focuses on developments beyond pushing the speed of these laser sources. After an overview of improvements to FDML over the last three years, a brief analysis of OCT imaging using FDML lasers with different wavelengths is presented. For the first time, high speed, high quality FDML imaging at 1550 nm is presented and compared to a system at 1310 nm. The imaging results of human skin for both wavelengths are compared and analyzed. Sample arm optics, power on the sample, heterodyne gain, detection bandwidth, colour cut levels and sample location have been identical to identify the influence of difference in scattering and water absorption. The imaging performance at 1310 nm in human skin is only slightly better and the results suggest that water absorption only marginally affects the penetration depth in human skin at 1550 nm. For several applications this wavelength may be preferred. (© 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH \& Co. KGaA, Weinheim)},
year = {2009}
}
R. Huber,
State-of-the-art and future of ultrahigh speed OCT, in CLEO/Europe and EQEC 2009 Conference Digest , Optica Publishing Group, 062009. pp. JTuA_3.
DOI:10.1109/CLEOE-EQEC.2009.5191695
Bibtex: BibTeX
@INPROCEEDINGS{5191695,
  author={Huber, Robert},
  booktitle={CLEO/Europe - EQEC 2009 - European Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics and the European Quantum Electronics Conference}, 
  title={State-of-the-art and future of ultrahigh speed OCT}, 
  year={2009},
  volume={},
  number={},
  pages={1-1},
  abstract={This paper reviews the current status of high speed OCT systems on the different levels of development: commercial, laboratory prototype style and proof of concept type systems. The pro and contra of SD-OCT and SS-OCT are discussed and an analysis of the desired optimum imaging speeds for various applications. SS-OCT systems are used for imaging in highly scattering tissue ~1300 nm, a line rate of 60 MHz was achieved by with SD-OCT.},
  keywords={},
  doi={10.1109/CLEOE-EQEC.2009.5191695},
  ISSN={},
  month={June},}
B. Biedermann, W. Wieser, C. Eigenwillig, T. Klein, and R. Huber,
Dispersion, coherence and noise of Fourier Domain Mode Locked (FDML) lasers, in CLEO/Europe - EQEC 2009 - European Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics and the European Quantum Electronics Conference , IEEE, 062009. pp. 1-1.
DOI:10.1109/CLEOE-EQEC.2009.5192900
Bibtex: BibTeX
@INPROCEEDINGS{5192900,
  author={Biedermann, Benjamin R. and Wieser, Wolfgang and Eigenwillig, Christoph M. and Klein, Thomas and Huber, Robert},
  booktitle={CLEO/Europe - EQEC 2009 - European Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics and the European Quantum Electronics Conference}, 
  title={Dispersion, coherence and noise of Fourier Domain Mode Locked (FDML) lasers}, 
  year={2009},
  volume={},
  number={},
  pages={1-1},
  abstract={We present a detailed analysis of coherence and noise of the FDML laser, depending on filter drive frequency, detuning and amount of cavity dispersion. The results provide insight into phase and amplitude noise of the laser light itself. We address the following two questions: (1) How much dispersion compensation is necessary for optimum laser performance in FDML for a certain width of the optical band pass filter? (2) How are timing mismatch effects, caused by either detuning of the drive frequency or chromatic dispersion in the cavity of the filter, related to coherence length and noise?},
  keywords={},
  doi={10.1109/CLEOE-EQEC.2009.5192900},
  ISSN={},
  month={June},}
B. Biedermann, W. Wieser, C. Eigenwillig, T. Klein, and R. Huber,
Dispersion, coherence and noise of Fourier domain mode locked lasers, Opt. Express , vol. 17, no. 12, pp. 9947-9961, 05 2009. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OE.17.009947
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Biedermann:09,
author = {Benjamin R. Biedermann and Wolfgang Wieser and Christoph M. Eigenwillig and Thomas Klein and Robert Huber},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Noise in imaging systems; Optical coherence tomography; Interferometry; Lasers, tunable; Optical coherence tomography; Dispersion; Laser light; Laser modes; Laser operation; Laser sources; Mode locking; Swept lasers},
number = {12},
pages = {9947--9961},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Dispersion, coherence and noise of Fourier domain mode locked lasers},
volume = {17},
month = {Jun},
year = {2009},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-17-12-9947},
doi = {10.1364/OE.17.009947},
abstract = {We report on the effect of chromatic dispersion on coherence length and noise of Fourier Domain Mode Locked (FDML) lasers. An FDML laser with a sweep range of 100nm around 1550nm has been investigated. Cavity configurations with and without dispersion compensation have been analyzed using different widths of the intra-cavity optical band-pass filter. The measurements are compared to non-FDML wavelength swept laser sources. Based on these observations, a simple model is developed providing a connection between timing, photon cavity lifetime and characteristic time constant of the filter. In an optimized configuration, an instantaneous laser linewidth of 20pm is observed, corresponding to a 10{\texttimes} narrowing compared to the intra-cavity optical band-pass filter. A relative intensity noise of -133dBc/Hz or 0.2\% at 100MHz detection bandwidth during sweep operation is observed. For optimum operation, the filter drive frequency has to be set within 2ppm or 120mHz at 51kHz.},
}
T. Klein, W. Wieser, B. Biedermann, C. Eigenwillig, G. Palte, and R. Huber,
Raman pumped Fourier Domain Mode Locked (FDML) laser: Analysis of operation and application for optical coherence tomography (OCT), in CLEO/Europe - EQEC 2009 - European Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics and the European Quantum Electronics Conference , IEEE, 052009. pp. 1-1.
DOI:10.1109/CLEOE-EQEC.2009.5194704
Bibtex: BibTeX
@INPROCEEDINGS{5194704,
  author={Klein, Thomas and Wieser, Wolfgang and Biedermann, Benjamin R. and Eigenwillig, Christoph M. and Palte, Gesa and Huber, Robert},
  booktitle={CLEO/Europe - EQEC 2009 - European Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics and the European Quantum Electronics Conference}, 
  title={Raman pumped Fourier Domain Mode Locked (FDML) laser: Analysis of operation and application for optical coherence tomography (OCT)}, 
  year={2009},
  volume={},
  number={},
  pages={1-1},
  abstract={limitations of the sweep repetition rate of rapidly wavelength swept laser sources. Such sources can be applied for optical coherence tomography (OCT) using frequency domain detection. This technique is called swept source OCT (ss-OCT) or optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI). FDML lasers usually consist of a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) as laser gain medium, an output coupler, a periodically driven optical band-pass filter (FFP-TF) and an optical delay line, so that their total length is typically several kilometres.},
  keywords={},
  doi={10.1109/CLEOE-EQEC.2009.5194704},
  ISSN={},
  month={June},}
C. Eigenwillig, W. Wieser, B. Biedermann, and R. Huber,
Subharmonic Fourier domain mode locking, Opt. Lett. , vol. 34, no. 6, pp. 725-727, 03 2009. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OL.34.000725
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Eigenwillig:09,
author = {Christoph M. Eigenwillig and Wolfgang Wieser and Benjamin R. Biedermann and Robert Huber},
journal = {Opt. Lett.},
keywords = {Coherence imaging; Optical coherence tomography; Three-dimensional image acquisition; Lasers, tunable; Medical and biological imaging; Optical coherence tomography; Fourier domain mode locking; Laser operation; Laser sources; Laser systems; Mode locking; Optical coherence tomography},
number = {6},
pages = {725--727},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Subharmonic Fourier domain mode locking},
volume = {34},
month = {Mar},
year = {2009},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/ol/abstract.cfm?URI=ol-34-6-725},
doi = {10.1364/OL.34.000725},
abstract = {We demonstrate a subharmonically Fourier domain mode-locked wavelength-swept laser source with a substantially reduced cavity fiber length. In contrast to a standard Fourier domain mode-locked configuration, light is recirculated repetitively in the delay line with the optical bandpass filter used as switch. The laser has a fundamental optical round trip frequency of 285 kHz and can be operated at integer fractions thereof (subharmonics). Sweep ranges up to 95 nm full width centred at 1317 nm are achieved at the 1/5th subharmonic. A maximum sensitivity of 116 dB and an axial resolution of 12 $\mu$m in air are measured at an average sweep power of 12 mW. A sensitivity roll-off of 11 dB over 4 mm and 25 dB over 10 mm is observed and optical coherence tomography imaging is demonstrated. Besides the advantage of a reduced fiber length, subharmonic Fourier domain mode locking (shFDML) enables simple scaling of the sweep speed by extracting light from the delay part of the resonator. A sweep rate of 570 kHz is achieved. Characteristic features of shFDML operation, such as power leakage during fly-back and cw breakthrough, are investigated.},
}
K. Karnowski, M. Gora, B. Kaluzny, R. Huber, M. Szkulmowski, A. Kowalczyk, and M. Wojtkowski,
Swept source OCT imaging of human anterior segment at 200 kHz, in Ophthalmic Technologies XIX , Fabrice Manns and Per G. Söderberg and Arthur Ho, Eds. SPIE, 022009. pp. 716308.
DOI:10.1117/12.808555
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{10.1117/12.808555,
author = {Karol Karnowski and Michalina Gora and Bartlomiej Kaluzny and Robert Huber and Maciej Szkulmowski and Andrzej Kowalczyk and Maciej Wojtkowski},
title = {{Swept source OCT imaging of human anterior segment at 200 kHz}},
volume = {7163},
booktitle = {Ophthalmic Technologies XIX},
editor = {Fabrice Manns and Per G. S{\"o}derberg and Arthur Ho},
organization = {International Society for Optics and Photonics},
publisher = {SPIE},
pages = {716308},
abstract = {We present applicability of the high speed swept-source optical coherence tomography for in vivo imaging of the anterior segment of the human eye. Three dimensional imaging of the cornea with reduced motion artifacts is possible by using swept source with Fourier domain mode locking operating at 200kHz with 1300nm central wavelength. High imaging speeds allow for assessment of anterior and posterior corneal topography and generation of thickness and elevation maps.},
keywords = {Optical Coherence Tomography, Fourier domain detection methods, swept source OCT, anterior segment of the eye},
year = {2009},
doi = {10.1117/12.808555},
URL = {https://doi.org/10.1117/12.808555}
}
R. Huber,
Fourier domain mode locking: new lasers for optical coherence tomography, 02 2009. Online: SPIE.
DOI:10.1117/2.1200901.1440
Bibtex: BibTeX
@Misc{HU_2009_Huber_b,
  Title                    = {{Fourier domain mode locking: new lasers for optical coherence tomography}},

  Author                   = {Huber, Robert},
  Year                     = {2009},

  Booktitle                = {SPIE Newsroom},
  Doi                      = {10.1117/2.1200901.1440},
  ISSN                     = {18182259},
keywords = {AG-Huber_FDML, AG-Huber_OCT},
  Url                      = {http://www.spie.org/x33321.xml}
}
S. Tiede, N. Koop, J. Kloepper, R. Fassler, and R. Paus,
Nonviral in situ green fluorescent protein labeling and culture of primary, adult human hair follicle epithelial progenitor cells, Stem Cells , vol. 27, no. 11, pp. 2793-803, 2009.
DOI:10.1002/stem.213
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Tiede2009,
   author = {Tiede, S. and Koop, N. and Kloepper, J. E. and Fassler, R. and Paus, R.},
   title = {Nonviral in situ green fluorescent protein labeling and culture of primary, adult human hair follicle epithelial progenitor cells},
   journal = {Stem Cells},
   volume = {27},
   number = {11},
   pages = {2793-803},
   ISSN = {1066-5099},
   DOI = {10.1002/stem.213},
   year = {2009},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
P. Steven, M. Müller, N. Koop, and C. Rose,
Comparison of Cornea Module and DermaInspect for noninvasive imaging of ocular surface pathologies, Journal of Biomedical Optics , vol. 14, no. 6, pp. 064040-064040, 2009.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Steven-2009,
   author = {Steven, Philipp and Müller, Maya and Koop, Norbert and Rose, Christian and Hüttmann, Gereon},
   title = {Comparison of Cornea Module and DermaInspect for noninvasive imaging of ocular surface pathologies},
   journal = {Journal of Biomedical Optics},
   volume = {14},
   number = {6},
   pages = {064040-064040},
   note = {10.1117/1.3275475},
   abstract = {Minimally invasive imaging of ocular surface pathologies aims at securing clinical diagnosis without actual tissue probing. For this matter, confocal microscopy (Cornea Module) is in daily use in ophthalmic practice. Multiphoton microscopy is a new optical technique that enables high-resolution imaging and functional analysis of living tissues based on tissue autofluorescence. This study was set up to compare the potential of a multiphoton microscope (DermaInspect) to the Cornea Module. Ocular surface pathologies such as pterygia, papillomae, and nevi were investigated in vivo using the Cornea Module and imaged immediately after excision by DermaInspect. Two excitation wavelengths, fluorescence lifetime imaging and second-harmonic generation (SHG), were used to discriminate different tissue structures. Images were compared with the histopathological assessment of the samples. At wavelengths of 730nm, multiphoton microscopy exclusively revealed cellular structures. Collagen fibrils were specifically demonstrated by second-harmonic generation. Measurements of fluorescent lifetimes enabled the highly specific detection of goblet cells, erythrocytes, and nevus-cell clusters. At the settings used, DermaInspect reaches higher resolutions than the Cornea Module and obtains additional structural information. The parallel detection of multiphoton excited autofluorescence and confocal imaging could expand the possibilities of minimally invasive investigation of the ocular surface toward functional analysis at higher resolutions.},
   year = { 2009}
}
T. Just, E Lankenau, and H. Pau,
Optical coherence tomography of the oval window niche., J Laryngol Oto , vol. 1, pp. 1-6, 2009.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Just,
   author = {Just, T. and Lankenau, E and Hüttmann, G and Pau, H.W.},
   title = {Optical coherence tomography of the oval window niche.},
   journal = { J Laryngol Oto},
   volume = {1},
   pages = {1-6},
   year = {2009}
}
E. Lankenau, C. Schulz-Wackerbarth, M. Müller, and P. Steven,
Optical Coherence Tomography: from Retina Imaging to Intraoperative Use - a Review, Klinische Monatsblatter Fur Augenheilkunde , vol. 226, no. 12, pp. 958-964, 2009.
DOI:DOI 10.1055/s-0028-1109939
File: WOS:000273527800005
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Hüttmann2009,
   author = {Huttmann, G. and Lankenau, E. and Schulz-Wackerbarth, C. and Muller, M. and Steven, P. and Birngruber, R.},
   title = {Optical Coherence Tomography: from Retina Imaging to Intraoperative Use - a Review},
   journal = {Klinische Monatsblatter Fur Augenheilkunde},
   volume = {226},
   number = {12},
   pages = {958-964},
   note = {542VT
Times Cited:6
Cited References Count:48},
   abstract = {Background: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is new diagnostic procedure that has rapidly evolved in the last years. The recently developed spectral domain OCT allows one to increase the imaging speed by a hundred times compared to the first generation time domain OCT and enables three-dimensional imaging as well as real-time imaging of fast moving structures. Volumetric imaging improves the quantitative measurement of morphology and the evaluation of temporal changes. In addition, an exact correlation with images acquired with other imaging modalities is possible. Real-time imaging enables also the use of OCT during examinations with the slit-lamp and during ophthalmological surgery.
Methods: A spectral domain OCT was adapted to a slit lamp. 70 patients (91 eyes) were examined at the anterior or posterior segment of the eye. Images of healthy structures and different pathologies were compared to OCT images obtained with Stratus 3, Spectralis, and the SL-OCT. To demonstrate the feasibility of OCT during surgery, spectral domain OCT devices working with 20000 and 210000 A scans per second were coupled by specially developed optics to the camera port of a surgical microscope. The device was tested with phantoms and enucleated pig eyes.
Results and Conclusions: A5 kHz spectral domain OCT can image the retina during slit lamp-based indirect ophthalmoscopy with a quality similar to that of the Stratus 3. In addition, relevant structures of the anterior segment were imaged. Here, compared to commercially available devices, the imaged field was smaller and the angle of the anterior chamber was not directly visible due to the 830 nm wavelength, which had to be used for retinal imaging. Through the surgical microscope, a volumetric imaging of epithelium, Bowman's, Descemet's membranes, limbus, iris, lens, conjunctiva and sclera was demonstra-ted with several tens of centimetre working distance. Instruments and incisions in the cornea were visualised with 20 mu m precision. Real-time imaging and visualisation of volumetric OCT data were also demonstrated. In principle, all technical problems of an intraoperative use of OCT have been solved and a clinical trial will start in the near future. OCT has the potential to improve the precision of surgical interventions and may even enable new interventions.},
   keywords = {physiological optics
cornea
anatomy
in-vivo
ultrahigh-resolution
anterior segment
time-domain
blood-flow
eye
surgery
oct
cyclophotocoagulation
cornea},
   ISSN = {0023-2165},
   DOI = {DOI 10.1055/s-0028-1109939},
   url = {<Go to ISI>://WOS:000273527800005},
   year = {2009},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
T. Just, E. Lankenau, and H. Pau,
Optische Kohärenztomographie in der Mittelohrchirurgie, HNO , vol. 57, no. 5, pp. 421-427, 2009.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Just,
   author = {Just, T. and Lankenau, E. and Hüttmann, G. and Pau, H. W.},
   title = {Optische Kohärenztomographie in der Mittelohrchirurgie},
   journal = {HNO},
   volume = {57},
   number = {5},
   pages = {421-427},
   abstract = {Die Anwendung der optischen Kohärenztomographie (OCT) in der Mittelohrchirurgie gilt als vielversprechendes Diagnostikum, insbesondere wenn es um die intraoperative Abklärung der Ursache einer Stapesfixation, die intraoperative Beurteilung der Stapesfußplatte bei Revisionsstapesplastik und zur Orientierung bei der Kochleaimplantation, vorwiegend bei Missbildungen, geht. Die OCT bildet Mittel- und Innenohrstrukturen präzise ab und ermöglicht, diese zur Therapiefestlegung zu nutzen. Aus den eigenen bisherigen Ex- und In-vivo-Untersuchungen mit einem OCT-System, das an ein Operationsmikroskop gekoppelt ist, lassen sich derzeit – unter Berücksichtigung der bislang publizierten experimentellen Arbeiten – potenzielle Anwendungsgebiete definieren: Darstellung der ovalen Fensternische bei Revisionsstapes- und rekonstruktiver Mittelohrchirurgie sowie bei der explorativen Tympanotomie zur Abklärung von Perilymphfisteln und Visualisierung von Strukturen des nicht eröffneten Innenohrs.},
   keywords = {Medizin},
   year = {2009}
}

Übersicht der apparativen Entwicklungen in der optischen Kohärenztomografie: von der Darstellung der Retina zur Unterstützung therapeutischer Eingriffe. Optical Coherence Tomography: from Retina Imaging to Intraoperative Use- a Review, Klinische Monatsblätter für Augenheilkunde , vol. 226, no. 12, pp. 958, 2009.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Hüttmann2009,
   author = {Hüttmann, G.},
   title = {Übersicht der apparativen Entwicklungen in der optischen Kohärenztomografie: von der Darstellung der Retina zur Unterstützung therapeutischer Eingriffe. Optical Coherence Tomography: from Retina Imaging to Intraoperative Use- a Review},
   journal = {Klinische Monatsblätter für Augenheilkunde},
   volume = {226},
   number = {12},
   pages = {958},
   year = {2009}
}
C. Framme, A. Walter, P. Prahs, R. Regler, and C. Alt,
Structural changes of the retina after conventional laser photocoagulation and selective retina treatment (SRT) in spectral domain OCT, Curr Eye Res , vol. 34, no. 7, pp. 568-79, 2009.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Framme,
   author = {Framme, C. and Walter, A. and Prahs, P. and Regler, R. and Theisen-Kunde, D. and Alt, C. and Brinkmann, R.},
   title = {Structural changes of the retina after conventional laser photocoagulation and selective retina treatment (SRT) in spectral domain OCT},
   journal = {Curr Eye Res},
   volume = {34},
   number = {7},
   pages = {568-79},
   note = {Framme, Carsten
Walter, Andreas
Prahs, Philipp
Regler, Roman
Theisen-Kunde, Dirk
Alt, Clemens
Brinkmann, Ralf
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
England
Current eye research
Curr Eye Res. 2009 Jul;34(7):568-79.},
   abstract = {BACKGROUND: Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in patients can deliver retinal cross-sectional images with high resolution. This may allow the evaluation of the extent of damage to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the neurosensory retina after laser treatment. This article aims to investigate the value of SD-OCT in comparing laser lesions produced by conventional laser photocoagulation and selective retina treatment (SRT). MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a retrospective study, conventional retinal laser (CRL) lesions and SRT laser lesions were evaluated with SD-OCT. One hundred seventy-five CRL lesions were investigated in 10 patients with diabetic maculopathy at timepoints between 1 hr and 4 years after treatment. Ninety-one SRT lesions were examined in 9 patients with central serous retinopathy, geographic atrophy, and diabetic maculopathy at timepoints between 1 hr and 2 years. CRL lesions were applied with an ophthalmoscopically slightly grayish-white appearance (Nd:YAG laser at 532-nm wavelength; power 100-200 mW; retinal spot diameter 100 microm; pulse duration 100 ms). SRT lesions were applied with a Nd:YLF (527 nm; pulse duration 200 ns [30 pulses at 100 Hz]; energy 100-200 microJ/pulse; retinal spot diameter 200 microm) and were visible only angiographically. RESULTS: All CRL lesions were characterized by high reflectivity in OCT images throughout the full thickness of the neurosensory tissue 1 hr after irradiation, suggesting complete neurosensory coagulation. Strong contraction through the full thickness of the neurosensory layers was observed within 7 days after treatment. In contrast, the neural retina appeared unaffected after SRT. For both lesion types, the RPE layer appeared to be regular or thinner immediately after treatment, whereas within a period of 4 weeks, a RPE thickening indicating RPE proliferation was observable. One year and later after treatment, CRL lesions were characterized by RPE atrophy combined with significant damage of the neurosensory tissue. SRT lesions aged one year and older revealed unaffected neurosensory structures and an intact RPE layer. CONCLUSION: Spectral domain OCT can be used clinically to follow the development of laser-induced lesions over time. Postoperative RPE proliferation was observed in both CRL and SRT laser lesions. RPE atrophy appeared subsequently only in CRL lesions, whereas the neurosensory retina appeared unaffected following SRT. These results suggest the selective effect of SRT in humans without causing adverse effects to the neurosensory retina.},
   keywords = {Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Atrophy
Humans
Laser Coagulation/*adverse effects
Lasers, Solid-State/*adverse effects
Middle Aged
*Postoperative Complications
Retina/*pathology
Retinal Diseases/*diagnosis/*surgery
Retinal Pigment Epithelium/pathology
Retrospective Studies
*Tomography, Optical Coherence},
   year = {2009}
}
A Fritz, L Ptaszynski, and H Stoehr,
Dynamic of laser induced transient microbubble clusters, (BiOS), Conference on Biomedical Optics, Eds. Proc SPIE, 2009.
File: abstract.cfm
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Fritz2009,
   author = {Fritz, A and Ptaszynski, L and Stoehr, H and Brinkmann, R},
   title = {Dynamic of laser induced transient microbubble clusters},
   editor = {(BiOS), Conference on Biomedical Optics},
   publisher = {Proc SPIE},
   type = {Conference Proceedings},
year = { 2009},
URL = { https://www.osapublishing.org/abstract.cfm?uri=ECBO-2009-7373_0D}
}
S. Freidank, and N. Linz,
Mit der biomedizinischen Optik hoch hinaus - Lübecker Projekt zur Laserforschung auf der Zugspitze , Focus Uni Luebeck / Universität Lübeck , vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 16, 2009.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Freidank,
   author = {Freidank, S. and Linz, N.},
   title = {Mit der biomedizinischen Optik hoch hinaus - Lübecker Projekt zur Laserforschung auf der Zugspitze },
   journal = {Focus Uni Luebeck / Universität Lübeck},
   volume = {26},
   number = {1},
   pages = {16},
   year = {2009}
}
K Schlott, K Hausmann, S Koinzer, L Ptaszynski, and J Roider,
Dependence of optoacoustic transients on exciting laser parameters for real-time monitoring of retinal photocoagulation, 2009. pp. 73730K-73730K.
File: 12.831913
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Langejürgen2009,
   author = {Langejürgen, J and Schlott, K and Bever, M and Hausmann, K and Koinzer, S and Ptaszynski, L and Roider, J and Birngruber, R and Brinkmann, R},
   title = {Dependence of optoacoustic transients on exciting laser parameters for real-time monitoring of retinal photocoagulation},
   pages = {73730K-73730K},
   note = {10.1117/12.831913},
   abstract = {The extent of retinal laser coagulations depends on the temperature increase at the fundus and the time of irradiation. Due to light scattering within the eye and variable fundus pigmentation the induced temperature increase and therefore the extent of the coagulations cannot be predicted solely from the laser parameters. We use optoacoustics to monitor the temperature rise in real-time in vivo (rabbit) and ex vivo (porcine eye) and to automatically control the coagulation strength. Continuous wave treatment laser radiation and pulsed probe laser light (1-1100 ns) are coupled into the same fibre and are imaged onto the retina by a laser slit lamp. The temperature dependent pressure waves are detected by an ultrasonic transducer embedded in a customary contact lens. Below the coagulation threshold the increase in acoustic amplitude due to thermal tissue expansion is up to 40 %. Best signal to noise ratios &gt; 10 are achieved with probe pulse durations of 1 to 75 ns. Further a time critical algorithm is developed which automatically ceases laser treatment when a certain preset coagulation strength is achieved. Coagulations with similar extent are obtained with this method in vitro and in vivo even when varying the power of the treatment laser by 50 %. These preliminary results are very promising, thus this method might be suitable for an automatic feedback controlled photocoagulation with adjustable coagulation strength.},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.831913},
   type = {Conference Proceedings},
Year = { 2009}
}
S. Kandelhardt, J. Leppert, J. Kandelhardt, E. Reusche, and A. Giese,
Multi-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy of brain-tumour tissue and analysis of cell density, Acta Neurochir , vol. 151, pp. 253-262, 2009.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Kandelhardt,
   author = {Kandelhardt, S.R. and Leppert, J. and Kandelhardt, JW and Reusche, E. and Hüttmann, G and Giese, A.},
   title = {Multi-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy of brain-tumour tissue and analysis of cell density},
   journal = {Acta Neurochir },
   volume = {151},
   pages = {253-262},
   year = {2009}
}
Y. Miura, and J. Roider,
Triamcinolone acetonide prevents oxidative stress-induced tight junction disruption of retinal pigment epithelial cells, Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol , vol. 247, no. 5, pp. 641-9, 2009.
DOI:10.1007/s00417-009-1041-6
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Miura2009,
   author = {Miura, Y. and Roider, J.},
   title = {Triamcinolone acetonide prevents oxidative stress-induced tight junction disruption of retinal pigment epithelial cells},
   journal = {Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol},
   volume = {247},
   number = {5},
   pages = {641-9},
   note = {Using Smart Source Parsing
May; Epub 2009 Feb 3},
   abstract = {PURPOSE: Oxidative stress is known to disrupt the integrity of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) tight junctions. The goal of this study is to evaluate the effect of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) on the junctional integrity of RPE under oxidative stress and to identify the underlying mechanisms. METHODS: Second passage porcine RPE cells were cultured on 6-well membrane inserts until 4 weeks after reaching confluence. Cells were incubated with TA (10(-5) M) for 30 min. FITC-containing medium was added to the upper chamber (cell's apical side). The cells were then challenged with 1 mM Hydrogen Peroxide (H(2)O(2)). After 5 h, the fluorescence intensity of the medium from lower chamber (cell's basolateral side) was measured using a fluorescence spectrofluorophotometer. This transepithelial flux of FITC-dextran was measured until the 21st day. The immunolocalization of occludin and F-actin was examined with fluorescence microscope. Reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio was determined by a colorimetric assay kit. RESULTS: Non-lethal oxidative stress by H(2)O(2) increased transepithelial flux of FITC-dextran significantly. TA inhibited this increase and preserved the lower flux through the whole experimental period. This permeability change by H(2)O(2) was reversible and recovered to the normal level within 3 weeks. In immunohistological study, H(2)O(2) reduced linear occludin staining at the cell border and increased actin stress fibers. TA prevented H(2)O(2)-induced disruption of junctional assembly of occludin and F-actin. Glutathione assay demonstrated that intracellular GSH/GSSG ratio decreased significantly with H(2)O(2), while TA preserved this ratio by up-regulating GSH synthesis. CONCLUSIONS: TA has a protective effect against oxidative stress-induced disruption of RPE tight junction by preserving cellular redox state.},
   year = {2009}
}
T. Just, E Lankenau, and H. Pau,
Intra-operative application of optical coherence tomography with an operating microscope., J Laryngol Otol , vol. 123, pp. 1027-1030, 2009.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Just,
   author = {Just, T. and Lankenau, E and Hüttmann, G and Pau, H.W.},
   title = {Intra-operative application of optical coherence tomography with an operating microscope.},
   journal = {J Laryngol Otol},
   volume = {123},
   pages = {1027-1030},
   year = {2009}
}
K. Schlott, L. Ptaszynski, and S. Koinzer,
Automatische Dosimetrie bei der Laserphotokoagulation der Netzhaut, 3. Dresdner Medizintechnik-Symposium mit DFG Forschungsschwerpunkt Protektive Beatmungskonzepte , vol. 10, 2009.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Bever2009,
   author = {Bever, M. and Schlott, K. and Ptaszynski, L. and Koinzer, S. and Birngruber, R. and Brinkmann, R.},
   title = {Automatische Dosimetrie bei der Laserphotokoagulation der Netzhaut},
   journal = {3. Dresdner Medizintechnik-Symposium mit DFG Forschungsschwerpunkt Protektive Beatmungskonzepte},
   volume = {10},
   year = {2009},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
G. Hüttmann, C. Yao, X. Qu, Z. Zhang, and R. Rahmanzadeh,
Influence of Laser Parameters on Membrane Permeability with Nanoparticles and Targeted Antibody Transfection, J Biomed Opt , vol. 14, pp. 054034, 2009.
DOI:10.1117/1.3253320
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Yao,
   author = {Yao, C and Qu, X. and Zhang, Z. and B., Yao and Hüttmann, G and Rahmanzadeh, R.},
   title = {Influence of Laser Parameters on Membrane Permeability with Nanoparticles and Targeted Antibody Transfection},
   journal = {J Biomed Opt},
   volume = {14},
   pages = {054034},
   note = {Journal article},
   year = {2009}
}
F. Gasca, L. Ramrath, G. Huettmann, and A. Schweikard,
Automated segmentation of tissue structures in optical coherence tomography data, J Biomed Opt , vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 034046, 2009.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Gasca,
   author = {Gasca, F. and Ramrath, L. and Huettmann, G. and Schweikard, A.},
   title = {Automated segmentation of tissue structures in optical coherence tomography data},
   journal = {J Biomed Opt},
   volume = {14},
   number = {3},
   pages = {034046},
   note = {Using Smart Source Parsing
May-Jun},
   abstract = {Segmentation of optical coherence tomography (OCT) images provides useful information, especially in medical imaging applications. Because OCT images are subject to speckle noise, the identification of structures is complicated. Addressing this issue, two methods for the automated segmentation of arbitrary structures in OCT images are proposed. The methods perform a seeded region growing, applying a model-based analysis of OCT A-scans for the seed's acquisition. The segmentation therefore avoids any user-intervention dependency. The first region-growing algorithm uses an adaptive neighborhood homogeneity criterion based on a model of an OCT intensity course in tissue and a model of speckle noise corruption. It can be applied to an unfiltered OCT image. The second performs region growing on a filtered OCT image applying the local median as a measure for homogeneity in the region. Performance is compared through the quantitative evaluation of artificial data, showing the capabilities of both in terms of structures detected and leakage. The proposed methods were tested on real OCT data in different scenarios and showed promising results for their application in OCT imaging.},
   year = {2009}
}
D. Hillmann, and P. Koch,
Using nonequispaced fast Fourier transformation to process optical coherence tomography signals, Peter, E. Andersen and Brett, E. Bouma, Eds. SPIE, 2009. pp. 73720R.
File: ECBO.2009.7372_0R
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Hillmann,
   author = {Hillmann, Dierck and Huttmann, Gereon and Koch, Peter},
   title = {Using nonequispaced fast Fourier transformation to process optical coherence tomography signals},
   editor = {Peter, E. Andersen and Brett, E. Bouma},
   publisher = {SPIE},
   volume = {7372},
   pages = {73720R},
url = { https://doi.org/10.1364/ECBO.2009.7372_0R},
year = { 2009}

}
K. Lachmann, S. Eckert, A. Vogel, A. Klinger, A. Gebert, and C. Klages,
Development of a multifunctional coating system for laser-induced material transport, Progress in Organic Coatings , vol. 64, no. 2–3, pp. 294-299, 2009.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Lachmann,
   author = {Lachmann, Kristina and Eckert, Sebastian and Vogel, Alfred and Klinger, Antje and Gebert, Andreas and Klages, Claus-Peter},
   title = {Development of a multifunctional coating system for laser-induced material transport},
   journal = {Progress in Organic Coatings},
   volume = {64},
   number = {2–3},
   pages = {294-299},
   abstract = {The aim of our research is to develop a novel surface coating for the use in laser microdissection and laser pressure catapulting (LMPC). LMPC is a contact- and contamination-free technique to separate histologic material and living cells for further proteomic and genomic analysis. Several physico-chemical functions must be included within the optimum coating system designed for this purpose, like optical absorption at the laser wavelength, combined with optical transparency in the visible region, a control of the laser ablation process, mechanical stability and biocompability for the adhesion of the histologic material. To achieve the optimum system the combination of several layers is required. The optical absorbance to capture the radiation energy from a frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser (?&#xa0;=&#xa0;355&#xa0;nm) is reached by a thin layer of zinc oxide (ZnO), deposited by hollow cathode gas flow sputtering. The laser ablation process is controlled by a polyelectrolyte multilayer, consisting of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS). The evaporation of chemisorbed water from the film is used to promote the catapulting process. For the mechanically stable, laser-dissectible layer organic coatings, like photoresists or lacquers, are suitable. Silica-containing polyacrylate nanocomposites were employed for this purpose. The investigation of the coating system included LMPC experiments with varying compositions of the layer system. The best results were obtained using a system consisting of ZnO, a polyelectrolyte multilayer deposited from 0.1&#xa0;M Na2SO4 containing polymer solutions, and a 1.5-?m thick layer of the polyacrylate nanocomposite. To check the quality of the developed system, experiments with the commonly used poly(ethylene naphthalate) (PEN) foil were performed simultaneously. In addition to the determination of the parameters required for LMPC, quantitative real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (rt-PCR) of the dissected material verified the benefit of the new system.},
   keywords = {Laser microdissection
Laser pressure catapulting
Polyelectrolyte multilayer
Laser ablation
Zinc oxide},
   year = {2009}
}
C. Framme, and G. Panagakis,
Effects on Choroidal Neovascularizations after Anti-VEGF Upload Using Intravitreal Ranibizumab as Determined by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography, Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci , 2009.
DOI:iovs.09-4496 [pii] 10.1167/iovs.09-4496
File: query.fcgi
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Framme2009,
   author = {Framme, C. and Panagakis, G. and Birngruber, R.},
   title = {Effects on Choroidal Neovascularizations after Anti-VEGF Upload Using Intravitreal Ranibizumab as Determined by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography},
   journal = {Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci},
   note = {Journal article
Investigative ophthalmology & visual science
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2009 Oct 29.},
   abstract = {Purpose: To image CNV structure before and after anti-VEGF treatment using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Material and methods: In 78 patients newly diagnosed CNVs (classic CNV: n=16; occult CNV: n=54; minimal classic CNV: n=8) due to AMD were imaged before and 4 weeks after anti-VEGF upload with 3 intravitreal injections of Ranibizumab. Qualitative (structural changes) and quantitative measurements (diameter and thickness) of the CNVs were obtained from the OCT images using the Heidelberg Eye Explorer software. Results: Classic CNV components were observed above the RPE/photoreceptor complex, whereas occult CNVs stayed below. Qualitatively, overall CNV architecture appeared to be unchanged in 78%, reduced in thickness in 18%, and became larger in 4%. Quantitatively, for all CNV subtypes the diameter of CNVs (preoperatively: 2813mum; postoperatively: 2804mum) did not change after treatment (classic CNVs: p=0.390; occult CNVs: p=0.405, minimal classic CNVs: p=0.092) independently of postoperative retinal edema. The overall thickness of the CNV; however, reduced from 205mum to 175mum (p=0,000). Thickness reduction was significantly enhanced especially in CNVs with classic components (n=24; 252mum to 197mum (p=0.000); reduction: 22%), whereas reduction was smaller but also significant in occult CNVs (183mum to 164mum (p=0.003); reduction: 10%). Conclusion: Using SD-OCT CNV size can be two-dimensionally determined and followed up after intravitreal anti-VEGF treatment. Quantitative measurements underlined stable CNV diameters for all subtypes but revealed significant reduction of thickness especially for classic CNV components. Thus, Ranibizumab monotherapy is able to morphologically stop further CNV growth but does not lead to a major regression of CNVs especially of its occult components.},
   ISSN = {1552-5783 (Electronic)
0146-0404 (Linking)},
   DOI = {iovs.09-4496 [pii]
10.1167/iovs.09-4496},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=19875667},
   year = {2009},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
H. Böhringer, E. Lankenau, F. Stellmacher, E. Reusche, and A. Giese,
Imaging of human brain tumor tissue by near-infrared laser coherence tomography, Acta Neurochir (Wien) , vol. 151, no. 5, pp. 507-17; discussion 517, 2009.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Böhringer,
   author = {Böhringer, H. J. and Lankenau, E. and Stellmacher, F. and Reusche, E. and Huttmann, G. and Giese, A.},
   title = {Imaging of human brain tumor tissue by near-infrared laser coherence tomography},
   journal = {Acta Neurochir (Wien)},
   volume = {151},
   number = {5},
   pages = {507-17; discussion 517},
   note = {Bohringer, H J
Lankenau, E
Stellmacher, F
Reusche, E
Huttmann, G
Giese, A
Austria
Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2009 May;151(5):507-17; discussion 517. Epub 2009 Apr 3.},
   abstract = {INTRODUCTION: Intraoperative detection of residual tumor remains an important challenge in surgery to treat gliomas. New developments in optical techniques offer non-invasive high-resolution imaging that may integrate well into the workflow of neurosurgical operations. Using an intracranial glioma model, we have recently shown that time domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows discrimination of normal brain, diffusely invaded brain tissue, and solid tumor. OCT imaging allowed acquisition of 2D and 3D data arrays for multiplanar analysis of the tumor to brain interface. In this study we have analyzed biopsy specimens of human brain tumors and we present the first feasibility study of intraoperative OCT and post-image acquisition processing for non-invasive imaging of the brain and brain tumor. METHODS: We used a Sirius 713 Tomograph with a superluminescence diode emitting light at a near infrared central wavelength of 1,310 nm and a coherence length of 15 microm. The light is passed through an optical mono mode fiber to a modified OCT adapter containing a lens system with a working distance of 10 cm and an integrated pilot laser. Navigation-registered tumor biopsies were imaged ex vivo and the intraoperative site of optical tissue analysis was registered by marker acquisition using a neuronavigation system. RESULTS: Optical coherence tomography non-contact measurements of brain and brain tumor tissue produced B-scan images of 4 mm in width and 1.5-2.0 mm in depth at an axial and lateral optical resolution of 15 microm. OCT imaging demonstrated a different microstructure and characteristic signal attenuation profiles of tumor versus normal brain. Post-image acquisition processing and automated detection of the tissue to air interface was used to realign A-scans to compensate for image distortions caused by pulse- and respiration-induced movements of the target volume. Realigned images allowed monitoring of intensity changes within the scan line and facilitated selection of areas for the averaging of A-scans and the calculation of attenuation coefficients for specific regions of interest. CONCLUSION: This feasibility study has demonstrated that OCT analysis of the tissue microstructure and light attenuation characteristics discriminate normal brain, areas of tumor infiltrated brain, solid tumor, and necrosis. The working distance of the OCT adapter and the A-scan acquisition rate conceptually allows integration of the OCT applicator into the optical path of the operating microscopes. This would allow a continuous analysis of the resection plain, providing optical tomography, thereby adding a third dimension to the microscopic view and information on the light attenuation characteristics of the tissue.},
   keywords = {Biopsy
Brain Neoplasms/*diagnosis/pathology/surgery
Feasibility Studies
Glioma/*diagnosis/pathology/surgery
Humans
Monitoring, Intraoperative/methods
Pilot Projects
Tomography, Optical Coherence/*methods},
   year = {2009}
}
K. Schlott, J. Langejürgen, M. Bever, S. Koinzer, and R. Brinkmann,
Time resolved detection of tissue denaturation during retinal photocoagulation, 7373, Proc. SPIE, Eds. 2009. pp. 73730E-73730E.
File: 12.168030
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Schlott2009,
   author = {Schlott, Kerstin and Langejürgen, Jens and Bever, Marco and Koinzer, Stefan and Birngruber, Reginald and Brinkmann, Ralf},
   title = {Time resolved detection of tissue denaturation during retinal photocoagulation},
   editor = {7373, Proc. SPIE},
   pages = {73730E-73730E},
   note = {10.1117/12.831877},
   abstract = {The retinal photocoagulation is an established treatment method for different retinal diseases. The extent of the thermal coagulations depends strongly on the generated temperature increase. Until now the dosage is based on a pool of experience of the treating physicians as well as the appearance of the whitish lesions on the retina. The temperature course during photocoagulation can be measured in real-time by optoacoustics. A frequency-doubled Q-switched Nd:YLF laser (523nm, 75 ns) is used for optoacoustic excitation and a continuous-wave Nd:YAG laser (532nm) with adjustable irradiation time and power for heating of the fundus tissue. The onset of coagulation is determined by a photodiode that is placed directly behind enucleated porcine eyes, which served as a model. The onset of coagulation is observed clearly when scattering sets in. The required power for coagulation increases exponentially with decreasing irradiation time. The first results on rabbit eyes in vivo indicate that the onset of coagulation defined by just barely visibile lesions at a slit lamp sets in at an ED50 threshold temperature of 63°C for an irradiation time of 400 ms. In conclusion, optoacoustics can be used to determine temperatures during retinal laser treatments in real-time. This allows evaluating the time-temperature-dependence of retinal coagulation in vivo.},
   keywords = {AutoPhoN},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.831877},
   type = {Conference Proceedings},
year = { 2009},
url = { https://doi.org/10.1117/12.168030}
}

2008

T. Klein, W. Wieser, B. Biedermann, C. Eigenwillig, G. Palte, and R. Huber,
Raman-pumped Fourier-domain mode-locked laser: analysis of operation and application for optical coherence tomography, Opt. Lett. , vol. 33, no. 23, pp. 2815-2817, Dec. 2008. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OL.33.002815
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Klein:08,
author = {Thomas Klein and Wolfgang Wieser and Benjamin R. Biedermann and Christoph M. Eigenwillig and Gesa Palte and Robert Huber},
journal = {Opt. Lett.},
keywords = {Optical coherence tomography; Lasers, fiber; Lasers, Raman; Lasers, tunable; Optical coherence tomography; Laser operation; Mode locking; Optical coherence tomography; Optical components; Raman fiber lasers; Semiconductor lasers},
number = {23},
pages = {2815--2817},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Raman-pumped Fourier-domain mode-locked laser: analysis of operation and application for optical coherence tomography},
volume = {33},
month = {Dec},
year = {2008},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/ol/abstract.cfm?URI=ol-33-23-2815},
doi = {10.1364/OL.33.002815},
abstract = {We demonstrate a Raman-pumped Fourier-domain mode-locked (FDML) fiber laser and optical coherence tomography imaging with this source. The wavelength sweep range of only 30 nm centered around 1550 nm results in limited axial resolution, hence a nonbiological sample is imaged. An output power of 1.9 mW was achieved at a sweep rate of 66 kHz and a maximum ranging depth of ~2.5 cm. Roll-off characteristics are found to be similar to FDML lasers with semiconductor optical amplifiers as gain media. The application of Raman gain also enables unperturbed cavity ring-down experiments in FDML lasers for the first time, providing direct access to the photon lifetime in the laser cavity. Good agreement with nonswept cw operation is proof of the stationary operation of FDML lasers.},
}
V. Srinivasan, D. Adler, Y. Chen, I. Gorczynska, R. Huber, J. Duker, J. Schuman, and J. Fujimoto,
Ultrahigh-speed optical coherence tomography for three-dimensional and en face imaging of the retina and optic nerve head., Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science , vol. 49, no. 11, pp. 5103-5110, Nov. 2008.
DOI:10.1167/iovs.08-2127
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{10.1167/iovs.08-2127,
    author = {Srinivasan, Vivek J. and Adler, Desmond C. and Chen, Yueli and Gorczynska, Iwona and Huber, Robert and Duker, Jay S. and Schuman, Joel S. and Fujimoto, James G.},
    title = "{Ultrahigh-Speed Optical Coherence Tomography for Three-Dimensional and En Face Imaging of the Retina and Optic Nerve Head}",
    journal = {Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science},
    volume = {49},
    number = {11},
    pages = {5103-5110},
    year = {2008},
    month = {11},
    abstract = "{  purpose. To demonstrate ultrahigh-speed optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of the retina and optic nerve head at 249,000 axial scans per second and a wavelength of 1060 nm. To investigate methods for visualization of the retina, choroid, and optic nerve using high-density sampling enabled by improved imaging speed.  methods. A swept-source OCT retinal imaging system operating at a speed of 249,000 axial scans per second was developed. Imaging of the retina, choroid, and optic nerve were performed. Display methods such as speckle reduction, slicing along arbitrary planes, en face visualization of reflectance from specific retinal layers, and image compounding were investigated.  results. High-definition and three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the normal retina and optic nerve head were performed. Increased light penetration at 1060 nm enabled improved visualization of the choroid, lamina cribrosa, and sclera. OCT fundus images and 3D visualizations were generated with higher pixel density and less motion artifacts than standard spectral/Fourier domain OCT. En face images enabled visualization of the porous structure of the lamina cribrosa, nerve fiber layer, choroid, photoreceptors, RPE, and capillaries of the inner retina.  conclusions. Ultrahigh-speed OCT imaging of the retina and optic nerve head at 249,000 axial scans per second is possible. The improvement of ∼5 to 10× in imaging speed over commercial spectral/Fourier domain OCT technology enables higher density raster scan protocols and improved performance of en face visualization methods. The combination of the longer wavelength and ultrahigh imaging speed enables excellent visualization of the choroid, sclera, and lamina cribrosa. }",
    issn = {1552-5783},
    doi = {10.1167/iovs.08-2127},
    url = {https://doi.org/10.1167/iovs.08-2127},
    eprint = {https://arvojournals.org/arvo/content\_public/journal/iovs/932946/z7g01108005103.pdf},
}
B. Biedermann, W. Wieser, C. Eigenwillig, G. Palte, D. Adler, V. Srinivasan, J. Fujimoto, and R. Huber,
Real time en face Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography with direct hardware frequency demodulation, Opt. Lett. , vol. 33, no. 21, pp. 2556-2558, Oct. 2008. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OL.33.002556
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Biedermann:08,
author = {Benjamin R. Biedermann and Wolfgang Wieser and Christoph M. Eigenwillig and Gesa Palte and Desmond C. Adler and Vivek J. Srinivasan and James G. Fujimoto and Robert Huber},
journal = {Opt. Lett.},
keywords = {Coherence imaging; Optical coherence tomography; Three-dimensional image acquisition; Lasers, tunable; Medical and biological imaging; Optical coherence tomography; Analog to digital converters; Interference; Laser sources; Medical imaging; Mode locking; Optical coherence tomography},
number = {21},
pages = {2556--2558},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Real time en face Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography with direct hardware frequency demodulation},
volume = {33},
month = {Nov},
year = {2008},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/ol/abstract.cfm?URI=ol-33-21-2556},
doi = {10.1364/OL.33.002556},
abstract = {We demonstrate en face swept source optical coherence tomography (ss-OCT) without requiring a Fourier transformation step. The electronic optical coherence tomography (OCT) interference signal from a k-space linear Fourier domain mode-locked laser is mixed with an adjustable local oscillator, yielding the analytic reflectance signal from one image depth for each frequency sweep of the laser. Furthermore, a method for arbitrarily shaping the spectral intensity profile of the laser is presented, without requiring the step of numerical apodization. In combination, these two techniques enable sampling of the in-phase and quadrature signal with a slow analog-to-digital converter and allow for real-time display of en face projections even for highest axial scan rates. Image data generated with this technique is compared to en face images extracted from a three-dimensional OCT data set. This technique can allow for real-time visualization of arbitrarily oriented en face planes for the purpose of alignment, registration, or operator-guided survey scans while simultaneously maintaining the full capability of high-speed volumetric ss-OCT functionality.},
}
C. Eigenwillig, B. Biedermann, G. Palte, and R. Huber,
K-space linear Fourier domain mode locked laser and applications for optical coherence tomography, Opt. Express , vol. 16, no. 12, pp. 8916-8937, 06 2008. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OE.16.008916
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Eigenwillig:08,
author = {Christoph M. Eigenwillig and Benjamin R. Biedermann and Gesa Palte and Robert Huber},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Optical coherence tomography; Three-dimensional image acquisition; Interferometry; Lasers, tunable; Medical and biological imaging; Optical coherence tomography; Image quality; Laser modes; Laser sources; Medical imaging; Mode locking; Swept lasers},
number = {12},
pages = {8916--8937},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {K-space linear Fourier domain mode locked laser and applications for optical coherence tomography},
volume = {16},
month = {Jun},
year = {2008},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-16-12-8916},
doi = {10.1364/OE.16.008916},
abstract = {We report on a Fourier Domain Mode Locked (FDML) wavelength swept laser source with a highly linear time-frequency sweep characteristic and demonstrate OCT imaging without k-space resampling prior to Fourier transformation. A detailed theoretical framework is provided and different strategies how to determine the optimum drive waveform of the piezo-electrically actuated optical bandpass-filter in the FDML laser are discussed. An FDML laser with a relative optical frequency deviation $\Delta$$\nu$/$\nu$ smaller than 8{\textperiodcentered}10-5 over a 100 nm spectral bandwidth at 1300 nm is presented, enabling high resolution OCT over long ranging depths. Without numerical time-to-frequency resampling and without spectral apodization a sensitivity roll off of 4 dB over 2 mm, 12.5 dB over 4 mm and 26.5 dB over 1 cm at 3.5 {\textmu}s sweep duration and 106.6 dB maximum sensitivity at 9.2 mW average power is achieved. The axial resolution in air degrades from 14 to 21 {\textmu}m over 4 mm imaging depth. The compensation of unbalanced dispersion in the OCT sample arm by an adapted tuning characteristic of the source is demonstrated. Good stability of the system without feedback-control loops is observed over hours.},
}
C. Eigenwillig, B. Biedermann, and R. Huber,
Optical coherence tomography imaging with k-space linear Fourier Domain Mode Locked lasers, in 2008 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics and 2008 Conference on Quantum Electronics and Laser Science , IEEE, 052008. pp. 1-2.
DOI:10.1109/CLEO.2008.4551011
Bibtex: BibTeX
@INPROCEEDINGS{4571261,
  author={Eigenwillig, Christoph and Biedermann, Benjamin and Huber, Robert},
  booktitle={2008 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics and 2008 Conference on Quantum Electronics and Laser Science}, 
  title={Optical coherence tomography imaging with k-space linear fourier domain mode locked lasers}, 
  year={2008},
  volume={},
  number={},
  pages={1-2},
  abstract={We report on a Fourier Domain Mode Locked wavelength swept laser source with a highly linear time-frequency sweep characteristic and demonstrate OCT imaging without k-space resampling prior to Fourier transformation with this source.},
  keywords={},
  doi={10.1109/CLEO.2008.4551011},
  ISSN={},
  month={May},}
C. Jirauschek, C. Eigenwillig, B. Biedermann, and R. Huber,
Fourier domain mode locking theory, in 2008 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics and 2008 Conference on Quantum Electronics and Laser Science , IEEE, 052008. pp. 1-2.
DOI:10.1109/CLEO.2008.4551638
Bibtex: BibTeX
@INPROCEEDINGS{4571888,
  author={Jirauschek, Christian and Eigenwillig, Christoph and Biedermann, Benjamin and Huber, Robert},
  booktitle={2008 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics and 2008 Conference on Quantum Electronics and Laser Science}, 
  title={Fourier domain mode locking theory}, 
  year={2008},
  volume={},
  number={},
  pages={1-2},
  abstract={We present a theoretical model for the recently developed Fourier domain mode locked (FDML) lasers. The good agreement with experiment provides valuable insights into the mechanism of FDML operation.},
  keywords={},
  doi={10.1109/CLEO.2008.4551638},
  ISSN={},
  month={May},}
P. Andrews, Y. Chen, M. Onozato, S. Huang, D. Adler, R. Huber, J. Jiang, S. Barry, A. Cable, and J. Fujimoto,
High-resolution optical coherence tomography imaging of the living kidney, Laboratory Investigation , vol. 88, no. 4, pp. 441-449, 04 2008.
DOI:10.1038/labinvest.2008.4
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{ANDREWS2008441,
title = {High-resolution optical coherence tomography imaging of the living kidney},
journal = {Laboratory Investigation},
volume = {88},
number = {4},
pages = {441-449},
year = {2008},
issn = {0023-6837},
doi = {https://doi.org/10.1038/labinvest.2008.4},
url = {https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0023683722019158},
author = {Peter M Andrews and Yu Chen and Maristela L Onozato and Shu-Wei Huang and Desmond C Adler and Robert A Huber and James Jiang and Scott E Barry and Alex E Cable and James G Fujimoto},
keywords = {ischemia, kidney, optical coherence tomography (OCT), renal pathology, three-dimensional imaging, renal transplantation},
abstract = {Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a rapidly emerging imaging modality that can provide non-invasive, cross-sectional, high-resolution images of tissue morphology in situ and in real-time. In the present series of studies, we used a high-speed OCT imaging system equipped with a frequency-swept laser light source (1.3 μm wavelength) to study living kidneys in situ. Adult, male Munich–Wistar rats were anesthetized, a laparotomy was performed and the living kidneys were exposed for in situ observation. We observed the kidneys prior to, during and following exposure to renal ischemia induced by clamping the renal artery. The effects of intravenous mannitol infusion (1.0 ml of 25%) prior to and during renal ischemia were also studied. Finally, living kidneys were flushed with a renal preservation solution, excised and observed while being stored at 0–4°C. Three-dimensional OCT data sets enabled visualization of the morphology of the uriniferous tubules and the renal corpuscles. When renal ischemia was induced, OCT revealed dramatic shrinkage of tubular lumens due to swelling of the lining epithelium. Three-dimensional visualization and volumetric rendering software provided an accurate evaluation of volumetric changes in tubular lumens in response to renal ischemia. Observations of kidneys flushed with a renal preservation solution and stored at 0–4°C also revealed progressive and significant loss of tubular integrity over time. Intravenous infusion of mannitol solution resulted in thinning of the tubular walls and an increase in the tubular lumen diameters. Mannitol infusion also prevented the cell swelling that otherwise resulted in shrinkage of proximal tubule lumens during ischemia. We conclude that OCT represents an exciting new approach to visualize, in real-time, pathological changes in the living kidney in a non-invasive fashion. Possible clinical applications are discussed.}
}
D. Adler, Y. Chen, R. Huber, J. Schmitt, J. Connolly, and J. Fujimoto,
In vivo endomicroscopy using three-dimensional optical coherence tomography and Fourier domain mode locked lasers, in Coherence Domain Optical Methods and Optical Coherence Tomography in Biomedicine XII , Joseph A. Izatt and James G. Fujimoto and Valery V. Tuchin, Eds. SPIE, 032008. pp. 684708.
DOI:10.1117/12.761850
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{10.1117/12.761850,
author = {Desmond C. Adler and Yu Chen and Robert Huber and Joseph Schmitt and James Connolly and James G. Fujimoto},
title = {{In vivo endomicroscopy using three-dimensional optical coherence tomography and Fourier domain mode locked lasers}},
volume = {6847},
booktitle = {Coherence Domain Optical Methods and Optical Coherence Tomography in Biomedicine XII},
editor = {Joseph A. Izatt and James G. Fujimoto and Valery V. Tuchin},
organization = {International Society for Optics and Photonics},
publisher = {SPIE},
pages = {684708},
abstract = {We report an endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) system based on a Fourier Domain Mode Locked
(FDML) laser, a novel data acquisition (DAQ) system with optical frequency clocking, and a high-speed spiralscanning
fiber probe. The system is capable of acquiring three-dimensional (3D) in vivo datasets at 100,000 axial
lines/s and 50 frames/s, enabled by the high sweep rates of the FDML laser and the efficient data processing of
the DAQ system. This high imaging rate allows densely-sampled 3D datasets to be acquired, giving a resolvable
feature size of 9 &mgr;m x 20 &mgr;m x 7 &mgr;m (transverse x longitudinal x axial, XYZ). In vivo 3D endomicroscopy is
demonstrated in the rabbit colon, where individual colonic crypts are clearly visualized and measured. With
further improvements in DAQ technology, the imaging speed will be scalable to the hundreds of thousands of
axial lines/s supported by FDML lasers.},
keywords = {Optical coherence tomography, Endoscopic microscopy, Fourier Domain Mode Locked lasers, FDML, Three dimensional microscopy, In vivo microscopy, Biomedical optics, Swept source optical coherence tomography},
year = {2008},
doi = {10.1117/12.761850},
URL = {https://doi.org/10.1117/12.761850}
}
T. Bajraszewski, M. Wojtkowski, M. Szkulmowski, A. Szkulmowska, R. Huber, and A. Kowalczyk,
Improved spectral optical coherence tomography using optical frequency comb, Opt. Express , vol. 16, no. 6, pp. 4163-4176, 03 2008. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OE.16.004163
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Bajraszewski:08,
author = {Tomasz Bajraszewski and Maciej Wojtkowski and Maciej Szkulmowski and Anna Szkulmowska and Robert Huber and Andrzej Kowalczyk},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Optical coherence tomography; Fabry-Perot; Image reconstruction techniques; Multiframe image processing ; Frequency combs; Medical imaging; Ophthalmic imaging; Optical coherence tomography; Swept sources; Three dimensional imaging},
number = {6},
pages = {4163--4176},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Improved spectral optical coherence tomography using optical frequency comb},
volume = {16},
month = {Mar},
year = {2008},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-16-6-4163},
doi = {10.1364/OE.16.004163},
abstract = {We identify and analyze factors influencing sensitivity drop-off in Spectral OCT and propose a system employing an Optical Frequency Comb (OFC) to verify this analysis. Spectral Optical Coherence Tomography using a method based on an optical frequency comb is demonstrated. Since the spectrum sampling function is determined by the comb rather than detector pixel distribution, this method allows to overcome limitations of high resolution Fourier-domain OCT techniques. Additionally, the presented technique also enables increased imaging range while preserving high axial resolution. High resolution cross-sectional images of biological samples obtained with the proposed technique are presented.},
}
D. Adler, S. Huang, R. Huber, and J. Fujimoto,
Photothermal detection of gold nanoparticles using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography, Opt. Express , vol. 16, no. 7, pp. 4376-4393, 03 2008. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OE.16.004376
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Adler:08,
author = {Desmond C. Adler and Shu-Wei Huang and Robert Huber and James G. Fujimoto},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Optical coherence tomography; Phase measurement; Lasers, tunable; Nanomaterials; Laser beams; Medical imaging; Multimode lasers; Optical Doppler tomography; Phase modulation; Single mode lasers},
number = {7},
pages = {4376--4393},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Photothermal detection of gold nanoparticles using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography},
volume = {16},
month = {Mar},
year = {2008},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-16-7-4376},
doi = {10.1364/OE.16.004376},
abstract = {The detection of a gold nanoparticle contrast agent is demonstrated using a photothermal modulation technique and phase sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT). A focused beam from a laser diode at 808 nm is modulated at frequencies of 500 Hz--60 kHz while irradiating a solution containing nanoshells. Because the nanoshells are designed to have a high absorption coefficient at 808 nm, the laser beam induces small-scale localized temperature oscillations at the modulation frequency. These temperature oscillations result in optical path length changes that are detected by a phase-sensitive, swept source OCT system. The OCT system uses a double-buffered Fourier domain mode locked (FDML) laser operating at a center wavelength of 1315 nm and a sweep rate of 240 kHz. High contrast is observed between phantoms containing nanoshells and phantoms without nanoshells. This technique represents a new method for detecting gold nanoparticle contrast agents with excellent signal-to-noise performance at high speeds using OCT.},
}
X. Qu, J. Wang, Z. Zhang, N. Koop, R. Rahmanzadeh, and G. Hüttmann,
Imaging of cancer cells by multiphoton microscopy using gold nanoparticles and fluorescent dyes, vol. 13, no. 3, pp. 031217, 2008.
DOI:10.1117/1.2942373
ISBN:1083-3668 (Print) 1083-3668 (Linking)
Bibtex: BibTeX
@misc{Qu,
   author = {Qu, X. and Wang, J. and Zhang, Z. and Koop, N. and Rahmanzadeh, R. and Huttmann, G.},
   title = {Imaging of cancer cells by multiphoton microscopy using gold nanoparticles and fluorescent dyes},
   volume = {13},
   number = {3},
   pages = {031217},
   note = {Using Smart Source Parsing
May-Jun},
   abstract = {Due to their unique optical properties, optical probes, including metal nanoparticles (NPs) and fluorescent dyes, are increasingly used as labeling tools in biological imaging. Using multiphoton microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) at 750-nm excitation, we recorded intensity and FLIM images from gold NPs (30 nm) and the fluorescent dye Alexa 488 (A488) conjugated with monoclonal ACT-1 antibodies as well as Hoechst 33258 (H258) after incubation with the lymphoma cell line (Karpas-299). From the FLIM images, we can easily discriminate the imaging difference between cells and optical probes according to their distinct fluorescence lifetimes (cellular autofluorescence: 1 to 2 ns; gold NPs: <0.02 ns; A488: 3.5 ns; H258: 2.5 ns). The NP-ACT-1 and A488-ACT-1 conjugates were bound homogeneously on the surface of cells, whereas H258 stained the cell nucleus. We demonstrate that the emission intensity of gold NPs is about ten times stronger than that of the autofluorescence of Karpas-299 cells at the same excitation power. Compared with fluorescent dyes, stronger emission is also observed from gold NPs. Together with their high photostability, these observations suggest that gold NPs are a viable alternative to fluorescent dyes for cellular imaging and cancer diagnosis.},
   ISBN = {1083-3668 (Print)
1083-3668 (Linking)},
   year = {2008}
}
S Koinzer, H Elsner, C Klatt, and J Roider,
Selective Retina Therapy (SRT) of chronic subfoveal fluid after surgery of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment: three case reports, vol. 246, no. 10, pp. 1373-8, 2008.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@misc{Koinzer,
   author = {Koinzer, S and Elsner, H and Klatt, C and Brinkmann, R and Birngruber, R and Roider, J},
   title = {Selective Retina Therapy (SRT) of chronic subfoveal fluid after surgery of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment: three case reports},
   volume = {246},
   number = {10},
   pages = {1373-8},
   year = {2008}
}
J Neumann,
Self-limited growth of laser-induced vapor bubbles around single micro-absorbers, Appl Phys Lett , vol. 93, pp. 033901, 2008.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Neumann,
   author = {Neumann, J and Brinkmann, R},
   title = {Self-limited growth of laser-induced vapor bubbles around single micro-absorbers},
   journal = {Appl  Phys Lett},
   volume = {93},
   pages = {033901},
   year = {2008}
}
L. Ramrath, G. Moreno, H. Mueller, T. Bonin, G. Huettmann, and A. Schweikard,
Towards multi-directional OCT for speckle noise reduction, Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv , vol. 11, no. Pt 1, pp. 815-23, 2008.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Ramrath,
   author = {Ramrath, L. and Moreno, G. and Mueller, H. and Bonin, T. and Huettmann, G. and Schweikard, A.},
   title = {Towards multi-directional OCT for speckle noise reduction},
   journal = {Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv},
   volume = {11},
   number = {Pt 1},
   pages = {815-23},
   note = {Using Smart Source Parsing},
   abstract = {Multi-directional optical coherence tomography (MD-OCT) applies and extends the concept of angular compounding for speckle noise reduction to the area of OCT imaging. OCT images are acquired from a wide range of angles of view. Averaging of the rotated images therefore requires compensation of the parallax which is achieved by simple image registration for image reconstruction. Test measurements of a sample structure in a low and highly scattering environment show that the method improves the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of 4 and hence reduces speckle noise significantly. Experimental results also show that the proposed averaging increases the performance of common edge-detection algorithms.},
   year = {2008}
}
J. Sandeau, G. Caillibotte, J. Kandulla, H. Elsner, and G. Apiou-Sbirlea,
Numerical Modelling of Conductive and Convective Heat Transfers in Retinal Laser Applications, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 43-52, 2008.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@misc{Sandeau,
   author = {Sandeau, J. and Caillibotte, G. and Kandulla, J. and Elsner, H. and Brinkmann, R and Birngruber, R. and Apiou-Sbirlea, G.},
   title = {Numerical Modelling of Conductive and Convective Heat Transfers in Retinal  Laser Applications},
   volume = {1},
   number = {1},
   pages = {43-52},
   year = {2008}
}
S. Kantelhardt, H. Diddens, J. Leppert, V. Rohde, and A. Giese,
Multiphoton excited fluorescence microscopy of 5-ALA induced fluorescence in exprimental, Laser Surg Med , vol. 40 , no. 4, pp. 273-81, 2008.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Kantelhardt,
   author = {Kantelhardt, S.R. and Diddens, H. and Leppert, J. and Rohde, V. and Hüttmann, G. and Giese, A.},
   title = {Multiphoton excited fluorescence microscopy of 5-ALA induced fluorescence in exprimental},
   journal = {Laser Surg Med},
   volume = {40
},
   number = {4},
   pages = {273-81},
   year = {2008}
}
M. Mueller, G. Huettmann, N. Koop, and P. Steven,
Minimal-Invasive Imaging of Ocular Surface Pathologies - Confocal vs. Two-Photon Microscopy, Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science , vol. 49, no. 13, pp. 2258-2258, 2008.
File:
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Mueller2008,
   author = {Mueller, M. and Huettmann, G. and Koop, N. and Steven, P.},
   title = {Minimal-Invasive Imaging of Ocular Surface Pathologies - Confocal vs. Two-Photon Microscopy},
   journal = {Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science},
   volume = {49},
   number = {13},
   pages = {2258-2258},
   ISSN = {1552-5783},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/},
   year = {2008},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
J. Phillips, E. Fischer, M. Baron, N. Dries, F. Facchinelli, M. Kutzer, R. Rahmanzadeh, D. Remus, and D. Bartels,
Lindernia brevidens: a novel desiccation-tolerant vascular plant, endemic to ancient tropical rainforests, in Plant J , 2008, pp. 938-48.
DOI:10.1111/j.1365-313X.2008.03478.x
Bibtex: BibTeX
@incollection{Phillips,
   author = {Phillips, J. R. and Fischer, E. and Baron, M. and van den Dries, N. and Facchinelli, F. and Kutzer, M. and Rahmanzadeh, R. and Remus, D. and Bartels, D.},
   title = {Lindernia brevidens: a novel desiccation-tolerant vascular plant, endemic to ancient tropical rainforests},
   booktitle = {Plant J},
   volume = {54},
   edition = {2008/03/19},
   pages = {938-48},
   note = {Phillips, Jonathan R
Fischer, Eberhard
Baron, Miriam
van den Dries, Niels
Facchinelli, Fabio
Kutzer, Michael
Rahmanzadeh, Ramtin
Remus, Daniela
Bartels, Dorothea
England
Plant J. 2008 Jun;54(5):938-48. Epub 2008 Mar 13.},
   abstract = {A particular adaptation to survival under limited water availability has been realized in the desiccation-tolerant resurrection plants, which tend to grow in a habitat with seasonal rainfall and long dry periods. One of the best-studied examples is Craterostigma plantagineum. Here we report an unexpected finding: Lindernia brevidens, a close relative of C. plantagineum, exhibits desiccation tolerance, even though it is endemic to the montane rainforests of Tanzania and Kenya, where it never experiences seasonal dry periods. L. brevidens has been found exclusively in two fragments of the ancient Eastern Arc Mountains, which were protected from the devastating Pleistocene droughts by the stable Indian Ocean temperature. Analysis of the microhabitat reveals that L. brevidens is found in the same habitat as hygrophilous plant species, which further indicates that the plant never dries out completely. The objective of this investigation was to address whether C. plantagineum and L. brevidens have desiccation-related pathways in common, or whether L. brevidens has acquired novel pathways. A third, closely related, desiccation-sensitive species, Lindernia subracemosa, has been included for comparison. Mechanisms that confer cellular protection during extreme water loss are well conserved between C. plantagineum and L. brevidens, including the interconversion of 2-octulose to sucrose within the two desiccation-tolerant species. Furthermore, transcriptional control regions of desiccation-related genes belonging to the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family are also highly conserved. We propose that L. brevidens is a neoendemic species that has retained desiccation tolerance through genome stability, despite tolerance being superfluous to environmental conditions.},
   keywords = {Adaptation, Physiological
Gene Expression Profiling
Genome, Plant
Lamiaceae/genetics/metabolism/ physiology
Sucrose/metabolism
Tropical Climate
Water},
   year = {2008}
}
P. Steven, J. Rupp, N. Koop, C. Lensing, H. Laqua, and A. Gebert,
Experimental induction and three-dimensional two-photon imaging of conjunctiva-associated lymphoid tissue, Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci , vol. 49, no. 4, pp. 1512-7, 2008.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Steven2008,
   author = {Steven, P. and Rupp, J. and Huttmann, G. and Koop, N. and Lensing, C. and Laqua, H. and Gebert, A.},
   title = {Experimental induction and three-dimensional two-photon imaging of conjunctiva-associated lymphoid tissue},
   journal = {Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci},
   volume = {49},
   number = {4},
   pages = {1512-7},
   note = {Using Smart Source Parsing
Apr},
   abstract = {PURPOSE: Conjunctiva-associated lymphoid tissue (CALT) is assumed to be a key location for the generation of adaptive immune mechanisms of the ocular surface, but functional studies of CALT are still lacking. The purpose of this study was to establish an animal model that enables functional analysis of immune mechanisms going on within CALT. In addition, the use of two-photon microscopy, a new optical method, was evaluated for examining complex immunologic interactions of CALT by volume (three-dimensional [3-D]) and time-dependence (four-dimensional [4-D]) in vivo. METHODS: The conjunctiva of female BALB/c mice was repeatedly challenged with topical Chlamydia trachomatis serovar C or a solution of ovalbumin and cholera toxin B. Two-photon microscopy was conducted on explanted, unfixed, and unstained eyes with adjacent nictitating membranes. RESULTS: After three to five stimulations, CALT was detected exclusively in the nictitating membrane of 73% (C. trachomatis) or 70% (ovalbumin/ cholera toxin) of the animals. CALT mainly consisted of CD45R/B220+ B cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Electron microscopy showed intraepithelial lymphocytes and follicles consisting of lymphocytes, dendritic cells, and macrophages. Two-photon microscopy based on tissue autofluorescence allowed all components of CALT to be detected three dimensionally. High-resolution images were generated in tissue depths of 65 microm below the mucosal surface. CONCLUSIONS: This study introduces a novel mouse model for functional investigations of CALT. Topical stimulation with C. trachomatis or ovalbumin/cholera toxin B reliably leads to CALT generation at the nictitating membrane. The use of two-photon microscopy enables groundbreaking 3-D and, in the future, intravital 4-D investigations of immunologic processes initiated in CALT.},
   year = { 2008}
}
C. Yao, Z. Zhang, R. Rahmanzadeh, and G. Hüttmann,
Laser-based gene transfection and gene therapy, IEEE Trans Nanobioscience , vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 111-9, 2008.
DOI:10.1109/TNB.2008.2000742
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Yao,
   author = {Yao, C. P. and Zhang, Z. X. and Rahmanzadeh, R. and Huettmann, G.},
   title = {Laser-based gene transfection and gene therapy},
   journal = {IEEE Trans Nanobioscience},
   volume = {7},
   number = {2},
   pages = {111-9},
   note = {Yao, C P
Zhang, Z X
Rahmanzadeh, R
Huettmann, G
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
United States
IEEE Trans Nanobioscience. 2008 Jun;7(2):111-9.},
   abstract = {The plasma membrane of mammalian cells can be transiently permeablized by optical means and exogenous materials or genes can be introduced into the cytoplasm of living cells. Until now, few mechanisms were exploited for the manipulation: laser is directly and tightly focused on the cells for optoinjection, laser-induced stress waves, photochemical internalization, and irradiation of selective cell targeting with light-absorbing particles. During the past few years, extensive progress and numerous breakthroughs have been made in this area of research. This review covers four different laser-assisted transfection techniques and their advantages and disadvantages. Universality towards various cell lines is possibly the main advantage of laser-assisted optoporation in comparison with presently existing methods of cell transfection.},
   keywords = {Cell Membrane/ radiation effects
DNA/ administration & dosage/ pharmacokinetics
Gene Therapy/ methods
Lasers
Transfection/ methods},
   year = {2008}
}
F Garwe, U Bauerschäfer, A Csaki, A Steinbrück, K Ritter, A Bochmann, J Bergmann, A Weise, D Akimov, G Maubach, K König, W Paa, J. Popp, and W Fritzsche,
Optically controlled thermal management on the nanometer length scale, Nanotechnology , vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 055207, 2008.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Garwe,
   author = {Garwe, F and Bauerschäfer, U and Csaki, A and Steinbrück, A and Ritter, K and Bochmann, A and Bergmann, J and Weise, A and Akimov, D and Maubach, G and König, K and Hüttmann, G and Paa, W and Popp, J and Fritzsche, W},
   title = {Optically controlled thermal management on the nanometer length scale},
   journal = {Nanotechnology},
   volume = {19},
   number = {5},
   pages = {055207},
   abstract = {The manipulation of polymers and biological molecules or the control of chemical reactions on a nanometer scale by means of laser pulses shows great promise for applications in modern nanotechnology, biotechnology, molecular medicine or chemistry. A controllable, parallel, highly efficient and very local heat conversion of the incident laser light into metal nanoparticles without ablation or fragmentation provides the means for a tool like a 'nanoreactor', a 'nanowelder', a 'nanocrystallizer' or a 'nanodesorber'. In this paper we explain theoretically and show experimentally the interaction of laser radiation with gold nanoparticles on a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) layer (one-photon excitation) by means of different laser pulse lengths, wavelengths and pulse repetition rates. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report showing the possibility of highly local (in a 40 nm range) regulated heat insertion into the nanoparticle and its surroundings without ablation of the gold nanoparticles. In an earlier paper we showed that near-infrared femtosecond irradiation can cut labeled DNA sequences in metaphase chromosomes below the diffraction-limited spot size. Now, we use gold as well as silver-enhanced gold nanoparticles on DNA (also within chromosomes) as energy coupling objects for femtosecond laser irradiation with single-and two-photon excitation. We show the results of highly localized destruction effects on DNA that occur only nearby the nanoparticles.},
   year = {2008}
}
Y. Chen, J. Schmitt, J. Connolly, and J. Fujimoto,
In vivo endomicroscopy using three-dimensional optical coherence tomography and {Fourier} domain mode locked lasers, in Biomedical Optics (BiOS) 2008 , Izatt, Joseph A. and Fujimoto, James G. and Tuchin, Valery V., Eds. International Society for Optics and Photonics, 2008. pp. 684708--684708--7.
DOI:10.1117/12.761850
File: proceeding.aspx
Bibtex: BibTeX
@InProceedings{HU_2008_Adlera,
  Title                    = {{In vivo endomicroscopy using three-dimensional optical coherence tomography and {Fourier} domain mode locked lasers}},
  Author                   = {Adler, Desmond C. and Chen, Yu and Huber, Robert and Schmitt, Joseph and Connolly, James and Fujimoto, James G.},
  Booktitle                = {Biomedical Optics (BiOS) 2008},
  Year                     = {2008},
  Editor                   = {Izatt, Joseph A. and Fujimoto, James G. and Tuchin, Valery V.},
  Month                    = feb,
  Pages                    = {684708--684708--7},
  Publisher                = {International Society for Optics and Photonics},

  Doi                      = {10.1117/12.761850},
  Url                      = {http://proceedings.spiedigitallibrary.org/proceeding.aspx?articleid=1326810\&resultClick=1}
}
C Framme, G Schüle, K Kobuch, and B Flucke,
Investigation of Selective Retina Treatment (SRT) by Means of 8 ns Laser Pulses in a Rabbit Model, vol. 40, pp. 20-27, 2008.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@misc{Framme,
   author = {Framme, C and Schüle, G and Kobuch, K and Flucke, B and Birngruber, R and Brinkmann, R},
   title = {Investigation of Selective Retina Treatment (SRT) by Means of 8 ns Laser Pulses in a Rabbit Model},
   volume = {40},
   pages = {20-27},
   year = {2008}
}
C Framme, J Roider, and V. Gabel,
Grundlagen und klinische Anwendung der Lasertherapie an der Netzhaut, vol. 225, no. 4, pp. 259-268, 2008.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@misc{Framme,
   author = {Framme, C and Roider, J and Brinkmann, R and Birngruber, R and Gabel, V-P},
   title = {Grundlagen und klinische Anwendung der Lasertherapie an der Netzhaut},
   volume = {225},
   number = {4},
   pages = {259-268},
   year = {2008}
}
C. Framme, H. Sachs, K. Kobuch, and B. Flucke,
Clinical evaluation of experimentally induced choroidal neovascularizations in Pigmented rabbits by subretinal injection of lipid hydroperoxide and consecutive preliminary photodynamic treatment with tookad, Ophthalmologica , vol. 222, no. 4, pp. 254-264, 2008.
DOI:Doi 10.1159/000136903
File: WOS:000258536200008
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Framme2008,
   author = {Framme, C. and Sachs, H. G. and Kobuch, K. and Flucke, B. and Birngruber, R.},
   title = {Clinical evaluation of experimentally induced choroidal neovascularizations in Pigmented rabbits by subretinal injection of lipid hydroperoxide and consecutive preliminary photodynamic treatment with tookad},
   journal = {Ophthalmologica},
   volume = {222},
   number = {4},
   pages = {254-264},
   note = {338UZ
Times Cited:3
Cited References Count:27},
   abstract = {Purpose: Up to date several approaches have been undertaken to achieve an 'easy-to-handle' animal model of choroidal neovascularizations (CNVs) in rabbits; however, so far in none of the studies could healthy retinal tissue be maintained, which is mandatory to further investigate the effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) or anti-vascular-endothelial-growth-factor treatments. It was our aim to reevaluate and verify the method of inducing experimental CNVs in rabbits using subretinally injected linoleic acid hydroperoxicle (LHP) as proposed by Tamai et al. and to use it for experimental PDT. Material and Methods: In 33 eyes of Chinchilla breed rabbits LHP of two different concentrations (25 and 100 mu g/50 mu l) was injected into the subretinal space via a transvitreal approach under guidance of an operation microscope. Ophthalmoscopic and angiographic examinations were performed on days 3, 7, 14 and 28 after surgery. Preliminary PDT with different experimental parameter sets was performed in 3 eyes using the new photosensitizer Tookad. Results: Using LHP in the higher concentration, an angiographically determined CNV induction was observed in 27% of all injection sites (n = 34) on days 14 and 28 revealing early well-demarcated and progressive leakage. No CNV was detected at the lower LHP concentration (60 injection sites). Subretinal CNV was verified histologically revealing vessel formation above the retinal pigment epithelium level. Herein, a significant damage to the outer retinal layers was always observed; however, the general structure of the choriocapillary layer was maintained. Tookad PDT was clinically able to completely stop leakage in I case and reduce leakage in 2 cases. Histologically the choriocapillary layer was occluded. Conclusion: Subretinal injection of LHP induces angiographically well-demarcated classic CNVs in rabbits; however, the CNV rate was low, and histology revealed severe damage of the outer retinal layers but not of the choriocapillary layer, which is important for studying PDT interactions. Preliminary experimental PDT could clinically stop or reduce leakage from angiographic CNV. Due to the small CNV rate and the significant collateral retinal tissue damage, this model seems to be only of partial suitability for investigating new treatment modalities in CNV. Copyright (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.},
   keywords = {age-related macular degeneration
animal model
choroidal neovascularization
retinal pigment epithelium
linoleic acid hydroperoxide
senile macular degeneration
bruchs membrane
ranibizumab
verteporfin
therapy
growth
model},
   ISSN = {0030-3755},
   DOI = {Doi 10.1159/000136903},
   url = {<Go to ISI>://WOS:000258536200008},
   year = {2008},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
A. Vogel, N. Linz, S. Freidank, and G. Paltauf,
Femtosecond-laser-induced nanocavitation in water: implications for optical breakdown threshold and cell surgery, vol. 100, no. 3, pp. 23, 2008.
ISBN:0031-9007 (Print) 0031-9007 (Linking)
Bibtex: BibTeX
@misc{Vogel2008,
   author = {Vogel, A. and Linz, N. and Freidank, S. and Paltauf, G.},
   title = {Femtosecond-laser-induced nanocavitation in water: implications for optical breakdown threshold and cell surgery},
   volume = {100},
   number = {3},
   pages = {23},
   note = {Using Smart Source Parsing
Jan 25;:038102. Epub 2008 Jan},
   abstract = {We determined the bubble radius R_(max) for femtosecond optical breakdown in water at 347, 520, and 1040 nm with an unprecedented accuracy (+/-10 nm). At threshold, R_(max) was smaller than the diffraction-limited focus radius and ranged from 190 nm to 320 nm. The increase of R_(max) with laser energy E_(L) is slowest at 347 nm, providing optimum control of cell surgery. Experimental results agree with a model of bubble formation in heated and thermoelastically stretched liquids. Theory predicts a threshold temperature T_(th) approximately equal to 168 degrees C. For T>300 degrees C, a phase explosion sets in, and R_(max) increases rapidly with E_(L).},
   ISBN = {0031-9007 (Print)
0031-9007 (Linking)},
   year = {2008}
}
C. Framme, A. Walter, and P. Prahs,
Comparison of threshold irradiances and online dosimetry for selective retina treatment (SRT) in patients treated with 200 nanoseconds and 1.7 microseconds laser pulses, Lasers Surg Med , vol. 40, no. 9, pp. 616-24, 2008.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Framme,
   author = {Framme, C. and Walter, A. and Prahs, P. and Theisen-Kunde, D. and Brinkmann, R.},
   title = {Comparison of threshold irradiances and online dosimetry for selective retina treatment (SRT) in patients treated with 200 nanoseconds and 1.7 microseconds laser pulses},
   journal = {Lasers Surg Med},
   volume = {40},
   number = {9},
   pages = {616-24},
   note = {Framme, Carsten
Walter, Andreas
Prahs, Philipp
Theisen-Kunde, Dirk
Brinkmann, Ralf
Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
United States
Lasers Surg Med. 2008 Nov;40(9):616-24.},
   abstract = {BACKGROUND: Selective retina therapy (SRT) solely affecting the RPE while sparing of the photoreceptors is usually performed with a train of repetitive laser pulses of 1.7 microseconds in duration. It was our purpose to evaluate the principle feasibility of SRT with shorter 200 nanoseconds laser pulses in patients. METHODS: Nineteen patients with macular disorders [diabetic maculopathy (DMP), geographic atrophy (GA), drusen maculopathy and central serous chorioretinopathy (CSR)] were treated with a prototype of a SRT laser (Nd:YLF laser; 527 nm; 1.7 microseconds and 200 nanoseconds pulse duration; 30 pulses at 100 Hz; spot size: 200 microm). Test lesions (n = 175) with increasing energy were applied at the lower arcade to determine the individual angiographic and ophthalmoscopic threshold radiant exposures (therapeutic window) before applying the central treatment lesions within these ranges additionally guided by online optoacoustic measurements. Postoperatively RPE damage was visualized and confirmed by fluorescein angiographic leakage and correlated with optoacoustic results. Additionally ED(50) damage thresholds were calculated by probit analysis. RESULTS: None of the short repetitive 200 nanoseconds laser pulses led to retinal hemorrhages or retinal ruptures. Nearly all of the test- and treatment lesions could be visualized by angiography indicating desired RPE damage but were ophthalmoscopically invisible suggesting intact neurosensory retinal structures. ED(50) cell damage threshold energies were significantly lower using 200 nanoseconds (99.6 microJ; n = 122) instead of 1.7 microseconds (196.3 microJ; n = 53) laser pulses. Optoacoustic and angiographic visibility correlated in 83.7% (200 nanoseconds) and 87.5% (1.7 microseconds). CONCLUSIONS: Selective RPE effects can safely be achieved using shorter 200 nanoseconds laser pulses in patients without adverse effects to the neurosensory retina. The required pulse energy compared to the standard 1.7 microseconds regime was reduced by about a factor of 2 suggesting a reduced heat generation and flow into adjacent tissues during the shorter laser impact and thus possibly enhancing selectivity. Optoacoustics also seem to be a viable alternative in 200 nanoseconds treatment for a non-invasive online dosimetry control system.},
   keywords = {Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Laser Coagulation/ methods
Lasers, Semiconductor/ therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Ophthalmoscopy
Radiometry
Retinal Diseases/pathology/radiography/ surgery
Retinal Pigment Epithelium/pathology/radiation effects/radiography},
   year = {2008}
}
P. Steven, and N. Koop,
Confocal microscopy versus two-photon microscopy: imaging of ocular surface pathologies, Ammasi, Periasamy and Peter, T. C. So, Eds. SPIE, 2008. pp. 686023.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Steven-2008,
   author = {Steven, Philip and Koop, Norbert and Huttmann, Gereon},
   title = {Confocal microscopy versus two-photon microscopy: imaging of ocular surface pathologies},
   editor = {Ammasi, Periasamy and Peter, T. C. So},
   publisher = {SPIE},
   volume = {6860},
   pages = {686023},
year = { 2008}
}
J Kandulla,
Non invasive real-time temperature determination during laser treatments at the retina, Photonik international , vol. 2008/1, pp. 42-45, 2008.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Kandulla,
   author = {Kandulla, J and Brinkmann, R},
   title = {Non invasive real-time temperature determination during laser treatments at the retina},
   journal = {Photonik international},
   volume = {2008/1},
   pages = {42-45},
   year = { 2008}
}
T. Just, E. Lankenau, G. Huettmann, and H. Pau,
Optical coherence tomography as a guide for cochlear implant surgery, in Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging , Nikiforos, K. and Bernard, C. and Haishan, Z., Eds. SPIE 6842, 2008. pp. F1-F6.
File: 12.771446
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Just-2008,
   author = {Just, T. and Lankenau, E. and Huettmann, G. and Pau, H.W.},
   title = {Optical coherence tomography as a guide for cochlear implant surgery},
   booktitle = {Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging},
   editor = {Nikiforos, K. and Bernard, C. and Haishan, Z.},
   publisher = {SPIE 6842},
   pages = {F1-F6},
url = { https://doi.org/10.1117/12.771446},
year = { 2008}

}
C. Framme, J. Roider, and V. Gabel,
Basic principles and clinical application of retinal laser therapy, Klinische Monatsblatter Fur Augenheilkunde , vol. 225, no. 4, pp. 259-268, 2008.
DOI:DOI 10.1055/s-2008-1027202
File: WOS:000255870100001
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Framme2008,
   author = {Framme, C. and Roider, J. and Brinkmann, R. and Birngruber, R. and Gabel, V. P.},
   title = {Basic principles and clinical application of retinal laser therapy},
   journal = {Klinische Monatsblatter Fur Augenheilkunde},
   volume = {225},
   number = {4},
   pages = {259-268},
   note = {301AZ
Times Cited:3
Cited References Count:39},
   abstract = {The scientific background of laser photocoagulation of the ocular fundus was studied extensively by several investigators in the 1970 s and 1980 s. The basic principles were succesfully resolved during that time and clinical consequences for proper application of the laser photocoagulation for various diseases were deduced. The present paper gives an overview about the physical basics of laser-tissue interactions during and after retinal laser treatment and the particular laser strategies in the treatment of different retinal diseases. Thus, it addresses the issue of the impact on tissue of laser parameters as wavelength, spot size, pulse duration and laser power. Additionally, the different biological tissue reactions after laser treatment are presented, such as, e.g., for retinopexia or macular treatments as well as for diabetic retinopathies. Specific laser strategies such as the selective laser treatment of the RPE (SRT) or the transpupillary thermotherapy (TTT) are presented and discussed.},
   keywords = {retina
anatomy
vitreous
subfoveal choroidal neovascularization
central vein occlusion
transpupillary thermotherapy
macular degeneration
pigment epithelium
photocoagulation
argon
trial
rpe
diseases},
   ISSN = {0023-2165},
   DOI = {DOI 10.1055/s-2008-1027202},
   url = {<Go to ISI>://WOS:000255870100001},
   year = {2008},
   type = {Journal Article}
}

2007

D. Adler, Y. Chen, R. Huber, J. Schmitt, J. Connolly, and J. Fujimoto,
Three-dimensional endomicroscopy using optical coherence tomography, Nature Photonics , vol. 1, no. 12, pp. 709-716, Nov. 2007.
DOI:10.1038/nphoton.2007.228
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{HU_2007_Adlera,
  Title                    = {Three-dimensional endomicroscopy using optical coherence tomography},
  Author                   = {Adler, Desmond C. and Chen, Yu and Huber, Robert and Schmitt, Joseph and Connolly, James and Fujimoto, James G.},
  Journal                  = {Nature Photonics},
  Year                     = {2007},
  Month                    = nov,
  Number                   = {12},
  Pages                    = {709--716},
  Volume                   = {1},
  Doi                      = {10.1038/nphoton.2007.228},
Timestamp                = {2014.11.20},
  ISSN                     = {1749-4885}
}
L. Kranendonk, X. An, A. Caswell, R. Herold, S. Sanders, R. Huber, J. Fujimoto, Y. Okura, and Y. Urata,
High speed engine gas thermometry by Fourier-domain mode-locked laser absorption spectroscopy, Opt. Express , vol. 15, no. 23, pp. 15115-15128, Nov. 2007. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OE.15.015115
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Kranendonk:07,
author = {Laura A. Kranendonk and Xinliang An and Andrew W. Caswell and Randy E. Herold and Scott T. Sanders and Robert Huber and James G. Fujimoto and Yasuhiro Okura and Yasuhiro Urata},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Spectrometers and spectroscopic instrumentation; Lasers, tunable; Spectroscopy, fluorescence and luminescence; Absorption; Spectroscopy, diode lasers; Spectroscopy, infrared; Fourier transform spectroscopy; Laser modes; Laser sources; Laser spectroscopy; Molecular spectra; Optical coherence tomography},
number = {23},
pages = {15115--15128},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {High speed engine gas thermometry by Fourier-domain mode-locked laser absorption spectroscopy},
volume = {15},
month = {Nov},
year = {2007},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-15-23-15115},
doi = {10.1364/OE.15.015115},
abstract = {We present a novel method for low noise, high-speed, real-time spectroscopy to monitor molecular absorption spectra. The system is based on a rapidly swept, narrowband CW Fourier-domain mode-locked (FDML) laser source for spectral encoding in time and an optically time-multiplexed split-pulse data acquisition system for improved noise performance and sensitivity. An acquisition speed of $\sim$100 kHz, a spectral resolution better than 0.1 nm over a wavelength range of $\sim$1335--1373 nm and a relative noise level of $\sim$5 mOD ($\sim$1\% minimum detectable base-e absorbance) are achieved. The system is applied for crank-angle-resolved gas thermometry by H2O absorption spectroscopy in an engine motoring at 600 and 900 rpm with a precision of $\sim$1\%. Influences of various noise sources such as laser phase and intensity noise, trigger and synchronization jitter in the electronic detection system, and the accuracy of available H2O absorption databases are discussed.},
}
D. Adler, J. Stenger, I. Gorczynska, H. Lie, T. Hensick, R. Spronk, S. Wolohojian, N. Khandekar, J. Jiang, S. Barry, A. Cable, R. Huber, and J. Fujimoto,
Comparison of three-dimensional optical coherence tomography and high resolution photography for art conservation studies, Opt. Express , vol. 15, no. 24, pp. 15972-15986, Nov. 2007. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OE.15.015972
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Adler:07,
author = {Desmond C. Adler and Jens Stenger and Iwona Gorczynska and Henry Lie and Teri Hensick and Ron Spronk and Stephan Wolohojian and Narayan Khandekar and James Y. Jiang and Scott Barry and Alex E. Cable and Robert Huber and James G. Fujimoto},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Optical coherence tomography; Photography; Three-dimensional image acquisition; Optical inspection; Lasers, tunable; Three-dimensional microscopy; Digital photography; Fourier domain mode locking; Image processing; Speckle interferometry; Three dimensional imaging; Three dimensional measurement},
number = {24},
pages = {15972--15986},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Comparison of three-dimensional optical coherence tomography and high resolution photography for art conservation studies},
volume = {15},
month = {Nov},
year = {2007},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-15-24-15972},
doi = {10.1364/OE.15.015972},
abstract = {Gold punchwork and underdrawing in Renaissance panel paintings are analyzed using both three-dimensional swept source/Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (3D-OCT) and high resolution digital photography. 3D-OCT can generate en face images with micrometer-scale resolutions at arbitrary sectioning depths, rejecting out-of-plane light by coherence gating. Therefore 3D-OCT is well suited for analyzing artwork where a surface layer obscures details of interest. 3D-OCT also enables cross-sectional imaging and quantitative measurement of 3D features such as punch depth, which is beneficial for analyzing the tools and techniques used to create works of art. High volumetric imaging speeds are enabled by the use of a Fourier domain mode locked (FDML) laser as the 3D-OCT light source. High resolution infrared (IR) digital photography is shown to be particularly useful for the analysis of underdrawing, where the materials used for the underdrawing and paint layers have significantly different IR absorption properties. In general, 3D-OCT provides a more flexible and comprehensive analysis of artwork than high resolution photography, but also requires more complex instrumentation and data analysis.},
}
R. Huber, D. Adler, V. Srinivasan, and J. Fujimoto,
Fourier domain mode locking at 1050 nm for ultra-high-speed optical coherence tomography of the human retina at 236,000 axial scans per second, Opt. Lett. , vol. 32, no. 14, pp. 2049-2051, 07 2007. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OL.32.002049
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Huber:07,
author = {R. Huber and D. C. Adler and V. J. Srinivasan and J. G. Fujimoto},
journal = {Opt. Lett.},
keywords = {Optical coherence tomography; Lasers, tunable; Medical and biological imaging; Amplified spontaneous emission; Fourier domain mode locking; Image quality; Optical coherence tomography; Retina; Retina scanning},
number = {14},
pages = {2049--2051},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Fourier domain mode locking at 1050 nm for ultra-high-speed optical coherence tomography of the human retina at 236,000 axial scans per second},
volume = {32},
month = {Jul},
year = {2007},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/ol/abstract.cfm?URI=ol-32-14-2049},
doi = {10.1364/OL.32.002049},
abstract = {A Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) laser at 1050 nm for ultra-high-speed optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of the human retina is demonstrated. Achievable performance, physical limitations, design rules, and scaling principles for FDML operation and component choice in this wavelength range are discussed. The fiber-based FDML laser operates at a sweep rate of 236 kHz over a 63 nm tuning range, with 7 mW average output power. Ultra-high-speed retinal imaging is demonstrated at 236,000 axial scans per second. This represents a speed improvement of ~10{\texttimes} over typical high-speed OCT systems, paving the way for densely sampled volumetric data sets and new imaging protocols.},
}
D. Adler, R. Huber, and J. Fujimoto,
Optical coherence tomography phase microscopy using buffered fourier domain mode locked (FDML) lasers at up to 370,000 lines per second, in 2007 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO) , IEEE, 052007. pp. 1-2.
DOI:10.1109/CLEO.2007.4452406
Bibtex: BibTeX
@INPROCEEDINGS{4452406,
  author={Adler, Desmond C. and Huber, Robert and Fujimoto, James G.},
  booktitle={2007 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO)}, 
  title={Optical Coherence Tomography Phase Microscopy Using Buffered Fourier Domain Mode Locked (FDML) Lasers at up to 370,000 Lines per Second}, 
  year={2007},
  volume={},
  number={},
  pages={1-2},
  abstract={Buffered FDML lasers are applied for phase-sensitive sub-nanometer OCT phase microscopy and dynamic surface displacement measurements at speeds up to 370,000 axial lines per second. Excellent phase stability is demonstrated at high speeds.},
  keywords={},
  doi={10.1109/CLEO.2007.4452406},
  ISSN={2160-9004},
  month={May},}
R. Huber, V. Srinivasan, D. Adler, I. Gorczynska, and J. Fujimoto,
Fourier Domain Mode Locking (FDML) in the non-zero dispersion regime: A laser for ultrahigh-speed retinal OCT imaging at 236kHz line rate, in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies , Optica Publishing Group, 052007. pp. CThAA5.
DOI:10.1109/CLEO.2007.4452681}
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Huber:07,
author = {Robert Huber and Vivek J. Srinivasan and Desmond C. Adler and I. Gorczynska and James G. Fujimoto},
booktitle = {Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies},
journal = {Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies},
keywords = {General physics; General science; Fourier domain mode locking; Image quality; In vivo imaging; Laser sources; Ophthalmic imaging; Optical coherence tomography},
pages = {CThAA5},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Fourier Domain Mode Locking (FDML) in the non-zero dispersion regime: A laser for ultrahigh-speed retinal OCT imaging at 236kHz line rate},
year = {2007},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/abstract.cfm?URI=CLEO-2007-CThAA5},
abstract = {Fourier Domain Mode Locking (FDML) in the 1070nm wavelength range is investigated. Problems, design rules and the performance of an FDML laser with a dispersive cavity are discussed. Retinal OCT imaging at 236kHz is demonstrated.},
}
S. Huang, A. Aguirre, R. Huber, D. Adler, and J. Fujimoto,
Swept source optical coherence microscopy using a Fourier domain mode-locked laser, Opt. Express , vol. 15, no. 10, pp. 6210-6217, 05 2007. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OE.15.006210
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Huang:07,
author = {Shu-Wei Huang and Aaron D. Aguirre and Robert A. Huber and Desmond C. Adler and James G. Fujimoto},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Optical coherence tomography; Lasers, tunable; Medical and biological imaging; Confocal microscopy; Three-dimensional microscopy; Image quality; Laser sources; Mode locking; Optical delay lines; Swept sources; Three dimensional imaging},
number = {10},
pages = {6210--6217},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Swept source optical coherence microscopy using a Fourier domain mode-locked laser},
volume = {15},
month = {May},
year = {2007},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-15-10-6210},
doi = {10.1364/OE.15.006210},
abstract = {Swept source optical coherence microscopy (OCM) enables cellular resolution en face imaging as well as integration with optical coherence tomography (OCT) cross sectional imaging. A buffered Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) laser light source provides high speed, three dimensional imaging. Image resolutions of 1.6 $\mu$m {\texttimes} 8 $\mu$m (transverse {\texttimes} axial) with a 220 $\mu$m {\texttimes} 220 $\mu$m field of view and sensitivity higher than 98 dB are achieved. Three dimensional cellular imaging is demonstrated in vivo in the Xenopus laevis tadpole and ex vivo in the rat kidney and human colon.},
}
M. Jenkins, D. Adler, M. Gargesha, R. Huber, F. Rothenberg, J. Belding, M. Watanabe, D. Wilson, J. Fujimoto, and A. Rollins,
Ultrahigh-speed optical coherence tomography imaging and visualization of the embryonic avian heart using a buffered Fourier Domain Mode Locked laser, Opt. Express , vol. 15, no. 10, pp. 6251-6267, 05 2007. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OE.15.006251
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Jenkins:07,
author = {M. W. Jenkins and D. C. Adler and M. Gargesha and R. Huber and F. Rothenberg and J. Belding and M. Watanabe and D. L. Wilson and J. G. Fujimoto and A. M. Rollins},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Three-dimensional image processing; Lasers; Medical and biological imaging; Optical coherence tomography; Developmental biology; Gated imaging; Imaging systems; Laser Doppler velocimetry; Laser modes; Mode locking},
number = {10},
pages = {6251--6267},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Ultrahigh-speed optical coherence tomography imaging and visualization of the embryonic avian heart using a buffered Fourier Domain Mode Locked laser},
volume = {15},
month = {May},
year = {2007},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-15-10-6251},
doi = {10.1364/OE.15.006251},
abstract = {The embryonic avian heart is an important model for studying cardiac developmental biology. The mechanisms that govern the development of a four-chambered heart from a peristaltic heart tube are largely unknown due in part to a lack of adequate imaging technology. Due to the small size and rapid motion of the living embryonic avian heart, an imaging system with high spatial and temporal resolution is required to study these models. Here, an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system using a buffered Fourier Domain Mode Locked (FDML) laser is applied for ultrahigh-speed non-invasive imaging of embryonic quail hearts at 100,000 axial scans per second. The high scan rate enables the acquisition of high temporal resolution 2D datasets (195 frames per second or 5.12 ms between frames) and 3D datasets (10 volumes per second). Spatio-temporal details of cardiac motion not resolvable using previous OCT technology are analyzed. Visualization and measurement techniques are developed to non-invasively observe and quantify cardiac motion throughout the brief period of systole (less than 50 msec) and diastole. This marks the first time that the preseptated embryonic avian heart has been imaged in 4D without the aid of gating and the first time it has been viewed in cross section during looping with extremely high temporal resolution, enabling the observation of morphological dynamics of the beating heart during systole.},
}
D. Adler, R. Huber, and J. Fujimoto,
Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography at up to 370,000 lines per second using buffered Fourier domain mode-locked lasers, Opt. Lett. , vol. 32, no. 6, pp. 626-628, 03 2007. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OL.32.000626
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Adler:07,
author = {Desmond C. Adler and Robert Huber and James G. Fujimoto},
journal = {Opt. Lett.},
keywords = {Optical coherence tomography; Phase measurement; Lasers, tunable; Amplified spontaneous emission; Laser sources; Mode locking; Optical coherence tomography; Phase measurement; Swept lasers},
number = {6},
pages = {626--628},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography at up to 370,000 lines per second using buffered Fourier domain mode-locked lasers},
volume = {32},
month = {Mar},
year = {2007},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/ol/abstract.cfm?URI=ol-32-6-626},
doi = {10.1364/OL.32.000626},
abstract = {Buffered Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) lasers are demonstrated for dynamic phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) and 3D OCT phase microscopy. Systems are operated at sweep speeds of 42, 117, and 370 kHz, and displacement sensitivities of 39, 52, and 102 pm are achieved, respectively. Sensitivities are comparable to spectrometer-based OCT phase microscopy systems, but much faster acquisition speeds are possible. An additional factor of sqrt 2 improvement in noise performance is observed for differential phase measurements, which is important for Doppler OCT. Dynamic measurements of piezoelectric transducer motion and static 3D OCT phase microscopy are demonstrated. Buffered FDML lasers provide excellent displacement sensitivities at extremely high sweep speeds.},
}
R. Huber, D. Adler, V. Srinivasan, I. Gorczynska, and J. Fujimoto,
Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) lasers at 1050 nm and 202,000 sweeps per second for OCT retinal imaging, in Coherence Domain Optical Methods and Optical Coherence Tomography in Biomedicine XI , James G. Fujimoto and Joseph A. Izatt and Valery V. Tuchin, Eds. SPIE, 022007. pp. 642907.
DOI:10.1117/12.704084
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{10.1117/12.704084,
author = {Robert A. Huber and Desmond C. Adler and Vivek J. Srinivasan and Iwona M Gorczynska and James G. Fujimoto},
title = {{Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) lasers at 1050 nm and 202,000 sweeps per second for OCT retinal imaging}},
volume = {6429},
booktitle = {Coherence Domain Optical Methods and Optical Coherence Tomography in Biomedicine XI},
editor = {James G. Fujimoto and Joseph A. Izatt and Valery V. Tuchin},
organization = {International Society for Optics and Photonics},
publisher = {SPIE},
pages = {642907},
abstract = {Retinal imaging ranks amongst the most important clinical applications for optical coherence
tomography (OCT) [1, 2]. The recent demonstration of increased sensitivity [3-6] in Fourier
Domain detection [7, 8] has opened the way for dramatically higher imaging speeds, up to axial
scan rates of several tens of kilohertz. However, these imaging speeds are still not sufficient for
high density 3D datasets and a further increase to several hundreds of kilohertz is necessary. In
this paper we demonstrate a swept laser source at 1050 nm with a sweep rate of 202 kHz. The
laser source provides ~10 mW average output power, up to 60 nm total sweep range and a
sensitivity roll off of less than 10 dB over 4 mm. In vivo 2D and 3D imaging of the human retina
at a record axial scan rate of 101 kHz is demonstrated. These results suggest that swept source
OCT has the potential to significantly outperform spectral/Fourier domain OCT for ophthalmic
imaging applications in the future.},
keywords = {tunable laser, optical coherence tomography, Fourier domain mode locking, swept source, OCT, FDML, retinal imaging, ophthalmic imaging},
year = {2007},
doi = {10.1117/12.704084},
URL = {https://doi.org/10.1117/12.704084}
}
D. Adler, R. Huber, and J. Fujimoto,
Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography using buffered Fourier domain mode-locked lasers at up to 370,000 scans per second, in Coherence Domain Optical Methods and Optical Coherence Tomography in Biomedicine XI , James G. Fujimoto and Joseph A. Izatt and Valery V. Tuchin, Eds. SPIE, 022007. pp. 64291L.
DOI:10.1117/12.704128
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{10.1117/12.704128,
author = {Desmond C. Adler and Robert Huber and James G. Fujimoto},
title = {{Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography using buffered Fourier domain mode-locked lasers at up to 370,000 scans per second}},
volume = {6429},
booktitle = {Coherence Domain Optical Methods and Optical Coherence Tomography in Biomedicine XI},
editor = {James G. Fujimoto and Joseph A. Izatt and Valery V. Tuchin},
organization = {International Society for Optics and Photonics},
publisher = {SPIE},
pages = {64291L},
abstract = {Phase sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used to obtain sub-nanometer
displacement measurements of biological and non-biological samples. This technique has many
applications, including detection of small amplitude surface motion, and high axial resolution OCT
phase microscopy. Doppler OCT is another type of phase sensitive imaging, where differential
phase measurements are used to detect fluid flow in biological specimens. For all types of phase
sensitive OCT, a light source with low phase noise is required in order to provide good
displacement sensitivity. High speed imaging is also necessary in order to minimize motion artifacts
and enable the detection of fast transient events. In this manuscript, buffered Fourier Domain Mode
Locked (FDML) lasers are demonstrated for ultrahigh-speed phase sensitive OCT detection. The
lasers are operated at sweep speeds of 42, 117, and 370 kHz, and displacement sensitivities of 39,
52, and 102 pm are achieved, respectively. These displacement sensitivities are comparable to
spectrometer-based phase sensitive OCT systems, but acquisition speeds 1.4 - 13x faster are
possible using buffered FDML lasers. An additional factor of √2 improvement in noise performance
is observed for differential phase measurements, which has important implications for Doppler
OCT. Dynamic measurements of rapid, small-amplitude piezoelectric transducer motion are
demonstrated. In general, buffered FDML lasers provide excellent displacement sensitivities at
extremely high sweep speeds for phase sensitive OCT measurements.},
keywords = {optical coherence tomography, OCT, optical coherence phase microscopy, swept source phase microscopy, doppler optical coherence tomography, frequency swept lasers, Fourier Domain Mode Locked lasers, FDML},
year = {2007},
doi = {10.1117/12.704128},
URL = {https://doi.org/10.1117/12.704128}
}
V. Srinivasan, R. Huber, I. Gorczynska, J. Fujimoto, J. Jiang, P. Reisen, and A. Cable,
High-speed, high-resolution optical coherence tomography retinal imaging with a frequency-swept laser at 850 nm, Opt. Lett. , vol. 32, no. 4, pp. 361-363, 02 2007. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OL.32.000361
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Srinivasan:07,
author = {V. J. Srinivasan and R. Huber and I. Gorczynska and J. G. Fujimoto and J. Y. Jiang and P. Reisen and A. E. Cable},
journal = {Opt. Lett.},
keywords = {Optical coherence tomography; Lasers, tunable; Medical and biological imaging; Optical coherence tomography; Retina scanning; Semiconductor lasers; Semiconductor optical amplifiers; Spontaneous emission; Tunable lasers},
number = {4},
pages = {361--363},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {High-speed, high-resolution optical coherence tomography retinal imaging with a frequency-swept laser at 850 nm},
volume = {32},
month = {Feb},
year = {2007},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/ol/abstract.cfm?URI=ol-32-4-361},
doi = {10.1364/OL.32.000361},
abstract = {High-speed, high-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of the human retina is demonstrated using a frequency-swept laser at 850 nm. A compact external cavity semiconductor laser design, optimized for swept-source ophthalmic OCT, is described. The laser enables an effective 16 kHz sweep rate with \&gt;10 mm coherence length and a tuning range of $\sim$35 nm full width at half-maximum, yielding an axial resolution of \&lt;7 $\mu$m in tissue.},
}
S Tedsen, and K Herrmann,
Partial kidney resection by use of a 1,94 µm thulium fiber laser, in Proc ECBO , SPIE, 2007.
File: 978-3-540-68764-1_72
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Theisen-Kunde2007,
   author = {Theisen-Kunde, D and Tedsen, S and Danicke, V and Herrmann, K and Brinkmann, R},
   title = {Partial kidney resection by use of a 1,94 µm thulium fiber laser},
   booktitle = {Proc ECBO},
   series = {Therapeutic Laser Applications and Laser-Tissue Interactions},
   publisher = {SPIE},
   volume = {6632},
   type = {Conference Proceedings},
year = { 2007},
url = { https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-68764-1_72}
}

Selektive Retina-Therapie (SRT), Zeitschrift für Medizinische Physik , vol. 17(1), no. 1, pp. 6-22, 2007.
DOI:DOI 10.1016/j.zemedi.2006.11.002
File:
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Brinkmann2007-1,
   author = {Brinkmann, R. and Birngruber, R.},
   title = {Selektive Retina-Therapie (SRT)},
   journal = {Zeitschrift für Medizinische Physik},
   volume = {17(1)},
   number = {1},
   pages = {6-22},
   note = {276HP
Times Cited:0
Cited References Count:42},
   abstract = {Selective Retina Therapy (SRT) is a new and very gentle laser method developed at the Medical Laser Center Lubeck. It is currently investigated clinically in order to treat retinal disorders associated with a decreased function of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). SRT is designed to selectively effect the RPE while sparing the neural retina and the photoreceptors as well as the chorioidea. Aim of the therapy is the rejuvenation of the RPE in the treated areas, which should ideally lead to a long term metabolic increase at the chorio- retinal junction. In contrast to conventional laser photocoagulation, which is associated with a complete thermal necrosis of the treated site, SRT completely retains full vision. This paper reviews the methods and mechanisms behind selective RPE effects and reports the first clinical results. An online dosimetry technique to visualize the ophthalmoscopically invisible effects is introduced.},
   keywords = {selective cellular effects
optoacoustics
online dosimetry
rpe
mu s-laser pulses
macula oedema
rcs
pigment epithelium
diabetic maculopathy
laser irradiation
time regimen
damage
rpe
photocoagulation
absorption
mechanisms
radiation},
   ISSN = {0939-3889},
   DOI = {DOI 10.1016/j.zemedi.2006.11.002},
   url = {<Go to ISI>://WOS:000254132200002},
   year = { 2007},
url = { https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17549989/},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
J Stalljohann, B Weber, K Schlott, and J Kandulla,
Retinal Temperature Determination During Laser Photocoagulation, Proc SPIE , vol. 6632, pp. 8, 2007.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Brinkmann2007,
   author = {Brinkmann, R and Stalljohann, J and Weber, B  and Schlott, K and Kandulla, J and Birngruber, R},
   title = {Retinal Temperature Determination During Laser Photocoagulation},
   journal = {Proc SPIE},
   volume = {6632},
   pages = {8},
   year = { 2007},
   type = {Proceeding}
}
A Vogel, V. Horneffer, B. Lorenz, N. Linz, S. Freidank, and A. Gebert,
Principles of laser microdissection and catapulting of histologic specimens and live cells, in Laser Manipulation of Cells and Tissues, Methods in Cell Biology , Berns, M. and Greulich, K.O., Eds. San Diego: Academic Press Elsevier, 2007, pp. 153-205.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inbook{Vogel2007-4,
   author = {Vogel, A and Horneffer, V. and Lorenz, B. and Linz, N. and Freidank, S. and Hüttmann, G. and Gebert, A.},
   title = {Principles of laser microdissection and catapulting of histologic specimens and live cells},
   booktitle = {Laser Manipulation of Cells and Tissues, Methods in Cell Biology},
   editor = {Berns, M.  and Greulich, K.O.},
   publisher = {Academic Press Elsevier},
   address = {San Diego},
   volume = {82},
   pages = {153-205},
   year = { 2007}
}
A. Vogel, I. Apitz, and V. Venugopalan,
Phase transitions, material ejection, and plume dynamics in pulsed laser ablation of soft biological tissues, in Oscillations, Waves and Interactions, T. Kurz, U. Parlitz, and U. Kaatze, eds.(Universitätsverlag Göttingen, Göttingen, 2007) , Kurtz, T., Parlitz, U. and Kaatze, U., Eds. Göttingen: Universitätsverlag, 2007, pp. 217-258.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inbook{Vogel2007-1,
   author = {Vogel, Alfred and Apitz, Ingo and Venugopalan, Vasan},
   title = {Phase transitions, material ejection, and plume dynamics in pulsed laser ablation of soft biological tissues},
   booktitle = {Oscillations, Waves and Interactions, T. Kurz, U. Parlitz, and U. Kaatze, eds.(Universitätsverlag Göttingen, Göttingen, 2007)},
   pages = {217-258},
   year = { 2007}
}
K. Schlott, J. Stalljohann, B. Weber, J. Kandulla, K. Herrmann, and R. Brinkmann,
Optoacoustic online temperature determination during retinal laser photocoagulation, 2007. pp. 66321B-66321B-8.
File: 12.728291
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Schlott2007,
   author = {Schlott, Kerstin and Stalljohann, Jens and Weber, Benjamin and Kandulla, Jochen and Herrmann, Katharina and Birngruber, Reginald and Brinkmann, Ralf},
   title = {Optoacoustic online temperature determination during retinal laser photocoagulation},
   volume = {6632},
   pages = {66321B-66321B-8},
   note = {10.1117/12.728291},
   abstract = {Retinal photocoagulation is an established treatment of different retinal diseases. The treatment relies on a short, local heating of the tissue which induces a denaturation. The resulting scar formation may for example prevent the further detachment of the retina. The extent of the coagulation is besides other parameters mostly dependent on the induced temperature increase. However, until today a temperature based dosimetry for photocoagulation does not exist. The dosage is rather based on the experience of the treating physicians to achieve visible whitish lesions on the retina. In this work a technique is presented, which allows an online temperature monitoring during photocoagulation. If an absorbing material is irradiated with short laser pulses, a thermoelastic expansion of the absorber induces an acoustic wave. Its amplitude is dependent on the temperature of the absorber. For analyzing the applicability of the optoacoustic temperature determination for dosimetry, measurements were performed on enucleated porcine eye globes. The pressure transients are detected by an ultrasonic transducer, which is embedded in an ophthalmologic contact lens. As long as no strong lesions occur, the determined temperatures are almost proportional to the power of the treatment laser. Using a spot diameter of 200 μm and different laser powers, the temperature rise at the end of the 400 ms irradiation was found to be approximately 0.16 °C/mW. The onset of the denaturation was observed around 50°C. The far aim of this project is an automatic regulation of the treatment laser onto a desired temperature course.},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.728291},
   type = {Conference Proceedings},
year = { 2007}
}
J Kandulla,
Nicht-invasive Echtzeit-Temperaturbestimmung während Laserbehandlungen an der Netzhaut des Auges, Photonik , pp. 42-46, 2007.
File: 22
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Kandulla,
   author = {Kandulla, J and Brinkmann, R},
   title = {Nicht-invasive Echtzeit-Temperaturbestimmung während Laserbehandlungen an der Netzhaut des Auges},
   journal = {Photonik},
   URL = { https://www.photonik.de/technologie-applikation/158/21005/22},
   pages = {42-46},
   year = { 2007}
}
X. Qu, K. Norbert, Z. Li, J. Wang, and Z. Zhang,
Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of Karpas 299 cells using ACT1 antibody conjugated gold nanoparticles, 2007. pp. 66301C-66301C-8.
File: 12.728239
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Qu2007,
   author = {Qu, Xiaochao and Norbert, Koop and Li, Zheng and Wang, Jing and Zhang, Zhenxi and Hüttmann, Gereon},
   title = {Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of Karpas 299 cells using ACT1 antibody conjugated gold nanoparticles},
   volume = {6630},
   pages = {66301C-66301C-8},
   note = {10.1117/12.728239},
   abstract = {Due to the unique optical properties, gold nanoparticles (NPs) can play a useful role in biological cellular imaging as biological probes. Using multiphoton microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) system, we recorded the images of Karpas 299 cells incubated without, or with gold NPs, and ACT1 antibodies conjugated with gold NPs. From the FLIM, we can easily discriminate the difference among different experiment conditions due to the distinct lifetime between cells and gold NPs. Our results present that nonconjugated gold NPs are accumulated inside cells, but conjugated gold NPs bind homogeneously and specifically to the surface of cancer cells. For single Karpas 299 cells, the signal is very week when the excitation power is about 10mw; while the power is approximately 28 mw, a very sharp cell imaging can be obtained. For the Karpas 299 incubated with ACT1 conjugated gold NPs, while the excitation power is 10mw, gold NPs have clear fluorescence signal so that the profile of cells can be detected; Signal of gold NPs is very strong when the power arrived in 20mw. These results suggest that the multiphoton lifetime imaging of antibody conjugated gold NPs can support a useful method in diagnosis of cancer.},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.728239},
   type = {Conference Proceedings},
year = { 2007}
}
A. Vogel, K. Lorenz, V. Horneffer, D. Smolinski, and A. Gebert,
Mechanisms of laser-induced dissection and transport of histologic specimens., Biophys J , vol. 93, pp. 4481-4500, 2007.
File: biophysj.106.102277
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Vogel2007-7,
   author = {Vogel, A. and Lorenz, K. and Horneffer, V. and Hüttmann, G. and von Smolinski, D. and Gebert, A.},
   title = {Mechanisms of laser-induced dissection and transport of histologic specimens.},
   journal = {Biophys J},
   volume = {93},
   pages = {4481-4500},
   year = { 2007},
url = { https://doi.org/10.1529/biophysj.106.102277}
}
A Vogel, J. Noack, and G. Paltauf,
Mechanisms of femtosecond laser nanoprocessing of biological cells and tissues, in The Eigth International Conference on Laser Ablation (COLA 2005) , Herman, P. and Hess, W ., Eds. 2007, pp. 249-254.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inbook{Vogel2007,
   author = {Vogel, A and Noack, J. and Hüttmann, G. and Paltauf, G.},
   title = {Mechanisms of femtosecond laser nanoprocessing of biological cells and tissues},
   booktitle = {The Eigth International Conference on Laser Ablation (COLA 2005)},
   editor = {Herman, P. and Hess, W .},
   series = {Journal of Physics: Conference Series},
   volume = {59},
   pages = {249-254},
   year = { 2007}
}
H. Stoehr, L. Ptaszynski, A. Fritz, and R. Brinkmann,
Interferometric optical online dosimetry for selective retina treatment (SRT), 2007. pp. 642619-642619-7.
File: 12.708521
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Stoehr2007-1,
   author = {Stoehr, Hardo and Ptaszynski, Lars and Fritz, Andreas and Brinkmann, Ralf},
   title = {Interferometric optical online dosimetry for selective retina treatment (SRT)},
   volume = {6426},
   pages = {642619-642619-7},
   note = {10.1117/12.708521},
   abstract = {In selective retina treatment (SRT) spatial confined tissue damage in the absorbing retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is obtained by applying microsecond laser pulses. The damage in the RPE is caused by transient microbubbles forming around the laser heated melanin granules inside the cells. For treatment of RPE related diseases, SRT is thought to share the therapeutic benefits of conventional photocoagulation but without affecting the photoreceptors. A drawback for effective clinical SRT is that the laser-induced lesions are ophthalmoscopically invisible. Therefore, a real-time feedback system for dosimetry is demanded in order to avoid undertreatment or unwanted collateral damage to the adjacent tissue. We develop a dosimetry system which uses optical interferometry for the detection of the transient microbubbles. The system is based on an optical fiber interferometer which is operated with a laser diode at 830nm. We present current results obtained with porcine RPE explants in vitro and complete porcine eye globes ex vivo.},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.708521},
   type = {Conference Proceedings},
Year = { 2007}
}
K. Herrmann, C. Flöhr, J. Stalljohann, G. Apiou-Sbirlea, J. Kandulla, and R. Brinkmann,
Influence of choroidal perfusion on retinal temperature increase during retinal laser treatments, 2007. pp. 66321D-66321D-7.
File: 12.728222
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Herrmann2007,
   author = {Herrmann, Katharina and Flöhr, Christian and Stalljohann, Jens and Apiou-Sbirlea, Gabriela and Kandulla, Jochen and Birngruber, Reginald and Brinkmann, Ralf},
   title = {Influence of choroidal perfusion on retinal temperature increase during retinal laser treatments},
   volume = {6632},
   pages = {66321D-66321D-7},
   note = {10.1117/12.728222},
   abstract = {In most retinal laser treatments the therapeutic effect is initiated by a transient temperature increase at and around the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Especially in long exposure time treatments like Transpupillary Thermotherapy (TTT) choroidal perfusion has a strong influence on the realized temperature at the fundus. The fundus blood circulation and therefore the heat dissipation is influenced by the intraocular pressure (IOP), which is investigated in the study presented here. In order to reduce the choroidal perfusion, the IOP is increased by injection of physiological saline solution into the eye of anaesthetized rabbits. The fundus is irradiated with 3.64 W/cm2 by means of a TTT-laser (λ = 810 nm) for t = 20 s causing a retinal temperature increase. Realtime temperature determination at the irradiated spot is achieved by a non invasive optoacoustic technique. Perfusion can be reduced by increasing IOP, which leads to different temperature increases when irradiating the retina. This should be considered for long time laser treatments.},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.728222},
   type = {Conference Proceedings},
year = { 2007}
}
A. Fritz, L. Ptaszynski, H. Stoehr, and R. Brinkmann,
Dynamics and detection of laser induced microbubbles in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), 2007. pp. 66321C-66321C-11.
File: 12.728344
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Fritz2007,
   author = {Fritz, Andreas and Ptaszynski, Lars and Stoehr, Hardo and Brinkmann, Ralf},
   title = {Dynamics and detection of laser induced microbubbles in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)},
   volume = {6632},
   pages = {66321C-66321C-11},
   note = {10.1117/12.728344},
   abstract = {Selective Retina Treatment (SRT) is a new method to treat eye diseases associated with disorders of the RPE. Selective RPE cell damage is achieved by applying a train of 1.7 μs laser pulses at 527 nm. The treatment of retinal diseases as e.g. diabetic maculopathy (DMP), is currently investigated within clinical studies, however 200 ns pulse durations are under investigation. Transient micro bubbles in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are expected to be the origin of cell damage due to irradiation with laser pulses shorter than 50 μs. The bubbles emerge at the strongly absorbing RPE melanosomes. Cell membrane disruption caused by the transient associated volume increase is expected to be the origin of the angiographically observed RPE leakage. We investigate micro bubble formation and dynamics in porcine RPE using pulse durations of 150 ns. A laser interferometry system at 830 nm with the aim of an online dosimetry control for SRT was developed. Bubble formation was detected interferometrically and by fast flash photography. A correlation to cell damage observed with a vitality stain is found. A bubble detection algorithm is presented.},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.728344},
   type = {Conference Proceedings}
}
A. Vogel, J. Noack, N. Linz, S. Freidank, and G. Paltauf,
Chapter 18 Femtosecond laser nanosurgery of biological cells and tissues, in Handai Nanophotonics , Hiroshi Masuhara, Satoshi Kawata and Fumio, Tokunaga, Eds. Elsevier, 2007, pp. 273-286.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inbook{Vogel2007-5,
   author = {Vogel, A. and Noack, J. and Hüttmann, G. and Linz, N. and Freidank, S. and Paltauf, G.},
   title = {Chapter 18 Femtosecond laser nanosurgery of biological cells and tissues},
   booktitle = {Handai Nanophotonics},
   editor = {Hiroshi Masuhara, Satoshi Kawata and Fumio, Tokunaga},
   publisher = {Elsevier},
   volume = {Volume 3},
   pages = {273-286},
   year = { 2007}
}
A. Vogel, J. Noack, and G. Paltauf,
Femtosecond Plasma-Mediated Nanosurgery of Cells and Tissues Laser Ablation and its Applications, Phipps, Claude, Eds. Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, 2007, pp. 231-280.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inbook{Vogel2007-6,
   author = {Vogel, Alfred and Noack, Joachim and Hüttman, Gereon and Paltauf, Günther},
   title = {Femtosecond Plasma-Mediated Nanosurgery of Cells and Tissues
Laser Ablation and its Applications},
   editor = {Phipps, Claude},
   series = {Springer Series in Optical Sciences},
   publisher = {Springer Berlin / Heidelberg},
   volume = {129},
   pages = {231-280},
   keywords = {Physics and Astronomy},
   year = { 2007}
}
S. Kantelhardt, J. Leppert, J. Krajewski, N. Petkus, E. Reusche, V. Tronnier, and A. Giese,
Imaging of brain and brain tumor specimens by time-resolved multiphoton excitation microscopy ex vivo, Neuro Oncol , vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 103--12, 2007.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Kantelhardt,
   title        = {Imaging of brain and brain tumor specimens by time-resolved multiphoton excitation microscopy ex vivo},
   author       = {Kantelhardt, S. R. and Leppert, J. and Krajewski, J. and Petkus, N. and Reusche, E. and Tronnier, V. M. and Huttmann, G. and Giese, A.},
   year         = 2007,
   journal      = {Neuro Oncol},
   volume       = 9,
   number       = 2,
   pages        = {103--12},
   note         = {Kantelhardt, Sven R Leppert, Jan Krajewski, Jochen Petkus, Nadine Reusche, Erich Tronnier, Volker M Huttmann, Gereon Giese, Alf United States Neuro Oncol. 2007 Apr;9(2):103-12. Epub 2007 Feb 26.},
   abstract     = {Multiphoton excitation fluorescent microscopy is a laser-based technology that allows subcellular resolution of native tissues in situ. We have recently applied this technology to the structural and photochemical imaging of cultured glioma cells and experimental gliomas ex vivo. We demonstrated that high microanatomical definition of the tumor, invasion zone, and normal adjacent brain can be obtained down to single-cell resolution in unprocessed tissue blocks. In this study, we used multiphoton excitation and four-dimensional microscopy to generate fluorescence lifetime maps of the murine brain anatomy, experimental glioma tissue, and biopsy specimens of human glial tumors. In murine brain, cellular and noncellular elements of the normal anatomy were identified. Distinct excitation profiles and lifetimes of endogenous fluorophores were identified for specific brain regions. Intracranial grafts of human glioma cell lines in mouse brain were used to study the excitation profiles and fluorescence lifetimes of tumor cells and adjacent host brain. These studies demonstrated that normal brain and tumor could be distinguished on the basis of fluorescence intensity and fluorescence lifetime profiles. Human brain specimens and brain tumor biopsies were also analyzed by multiphoton microscopy, which demonstrated distinct excitation and lifetime profiles in glioma specimens and tumor-adjacent brain. This study demonstrates that multiphoton excitation of autofluorescence can distinguish tumor tissue and normal brain based on the intensity and lifetime of fluorescence. Further technical developments in this technology may provide a means for in situ tissue analysis, which might be used to detect residual tumor at the resection edge.},
   keywords     = {Animals Brain/anatomy & histology/ pathology Brain Neoplasms/ pathology Disease Models, Animal Glioma/pathology Mice Mice, Inbred Strains Microscopy, Fluorescence, Multiphoton/instrumentation/ methods Sensitivity and Specificity}
}
R. Quaden, G. Klaws, and G. Lutter,
Percutaneous aortic valve replacement: first endovascular resection of human aortic valves in situ, Eur J Cardiothorac Surg , vol. 31, no. 2, pp. 305, 2007.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Quaden,
   author = {Quaden, R. and Klaws, G. R. and Theisen-Kunde, D. and Lutter, G.},
   title = {Percutaneous aortic valve replacement: first endovascular resection of human aortic valves in situ},
   journal = {Eur J Cardiothorac Surg},
   volume = {31},
   number = {2},
   pages = {305},
   note = {1010-7940 (Print)
Journal Article},
   keywords = {Aortic Valve/*surgery
Endoscopy
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation/*methods
Humans
Laser Surgery/methods
Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive/*methods},
   year = {2007}
}

Der Weg in die Zukunft: In-vivo-Pathologie durch Laserscan-Mikroskopie, Der Gynäkologe , vol. 40, no. 5, pp. 372, 2007.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Hüttmann2007,
   author = {Hüttmann, G.},
   title = {Der Weg in die Zukunft: In-vivo-Pathologie durch Laserscan-Mikroskopie},
   journal = {Der Gynäkologe},
   volume = {40},
   number = {5},
   pages = {372},
   year = {2007}
}
J Neumann,
Nucleation dynamics around single microabsorbers in water heated by nanosecond irradiation, J Appl Phys , vol. 101, no. 114701, 2007.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Neumann,
   author = {Neumann, J and Brinkmann, R},
   title = {Nucleation dynamics around single microabsorbers in water heated by nanosecond irradiation},
   journal = {J Appl Phys},
   volume = {101},
   number = {114701},
   year = {2007}
}
V. Rusanov, H. Paulsen, L. Böttger, H. Winkler, J. Wolny, N. Koop, T. Dorn, C. Janiak, and A. Trautwein,
Mössbauer, nuclear inelastic scattering and density functional studies on the second metastable state of Na2[Fe(CN)5NO]·2H2O, Hyperfine Interactions , vol. 175, no. 1, pp. 141-150, 2007.
DOI:10.1007/s10751-008-9598-8
File: s10751-008-9598-8
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Rusanov2007,
   author = {Rusanov, V. and Paulsen, H. and Böttger, L. H. and Winkler, H. and Wolny, J. A. and Koop, N. and Dorn, Th. and Janiak, C. and Trautwein, A. X.},
   title = {Mössbauer, nuclear inelastic scattering and density functional studies on the second metastable state of Na2[Fe(CN)5NO]·2H2O},
   journal = {Hyperfine Interactions},
   volume = {175},
   number = {1},
   pages = {141-150},
   abstract = {The structure of the light-induced metastable state SII of Na2[Fe(CN)5NO]·2H2O was investigated by transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy (TMS) in the temperature range between 85 and 135 K, nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) at 98 K using synchrotron radiation and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The DFT and TMS results strongly support the view that the NO group in SII takes a side-on molecular orientation and, further, is dynamically displaced from one eclipsed, via a staggered, to a second eclipsed orientation. The population conditions for generating SII are optimal for measurements by TMS, yet they are modest for accumulating NIS spectra. Optimization of population conditions for NIS measurements is discussed and new NIS experiments on SII are proposed.},
   ISSN = {1572-9540},
   DOI = {10.1007/s10751-008-9598-8},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10751-008-9598-8},
   year = {2007},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
D Vogel, and A. Gebert,
Mechanisms of laser-induced dissection and transport of histologic specimens, Biophys J , pp. 4481-4500, 2007.
File: biophysj.106.102277
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Vogel2007,
   author = {Vogel, A; Lorenz, K; Horneffer, V; Hüttmann, G; Von Smolinski, D and Gebert, A},
   title = {Mechanisms of laser-induced dissection and transport of histologic specimens},
   journal = {Biophys J},
   url = {https://doi.org/10.1529/biophysj.106.102277},
   pages = {4481-4500},
   ISSN = {0006-3495},
   year = {2007},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
S. Kantelhardt, J. Leppert, J. Krajewski, N. Petkus, E. Reusche, V. Tronnier, and A. Giese,
Imaging of brain and brain tumor specimens by time-resolved multiphoton excitation microscopy ex vivo, Neuro Oncol , vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 103-12, 2007.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Kantelhardt,
   author = {Kantelhardt, S. R. and Leppert, J. and Krajewski, J. and Petkus, N. and Reusche, E. and Tronnier, V. M. and Huttmann, G. and Giese, A.},
   title = {Imaging of brain and brain tumor specimens by time-resolved multiphoton excitation microscopy ex vivo},
   journal = {Neuro Oncol},
   volume = {9},
   number = {2},
   pages = {103-12},
   note = {Kantelhardt, Sven R
Leppert, Jan
Krajewski, Jochen
Petkus, Nadine
Reusche, Erich
Tronnier, Volker M
Huttmann, Gereon
Giese, Alf
United States
Neuro Oncol. 2007 Apr;9(2):103-12. Epub 2007 Feb 26.},
   abstract = {Multiphoton excitation fluorescent microscopy is a laser-based technology that allows subcellular resolution of native tissues in situ. We have recently applied this technology to the structural and photochemical imaging of cultured glioma cells and experimental gliomas ex vivo. We demonstrated that high microanatomical definition of the tumor, invasion zone, and normal adjacent brain can be obtained down to single-cell resolution in unprocessed tissue blocks. In this study, we used multiphoton excitation and four-dimensional microscopy to generate fluorescence lifetime maps of the murine brain anatomy, experimental glioma tissue, and biopsy specimens of human glial tumors. In murine brain, cellular and noncellular elements of the normal anatomy were identified. Distinct excitation profiles and lifetimes of endogenous fluorophores were identified for specific brain regions. Intracranial grafts of human glioma cell lines in mouse brain were used to study the excitation profiles and fluorescence lifetimes of tumor cells and adjacent host brain. These studies demonstrated that normal brain and tumor could be distinguished on the basis of fluorescence intensity and fluorescence lifetime profiles. Human brain specimens and brain tumor biopsies were also analyzed by multiphoton microscopy, which demonstrated distinct excitation and lifetime profiles in glioma specimens and tumor-adjacent brain. This study demonstrates that multiphoton excitation of autofluorescence can distinguish tumor tissue and normal brain based on the intensity and lifetime of fluorescence. Further technical developments in this technology may provide a means for in situ tissue analysis, which might be used to detect residual tumor at the resection edge.},
   keywords = {Animals
Brain/anatomy & histology/ pathology
Brain Neoplasms/ pathology
Disease Models, Animal
Glioma/pathology
Mice
Mice, Inbred Strains
Microscopy, Fluorescence, Multiphoton/instrumentation/ methods
Sensitivity and Specificity},
   year = {2007}
}
A. Vogel, J. Noack, and G. Paltauf,
Femtosecond Plasma-Mediated Nanosurgery of Cells and Tissues, in Laser Ablation and Its Applications , Phipps, Claude, Eds. Springer US, 2007, pp. 231-280.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inbook{Vogel2007-2,
   author = {Vogel, Alfred and Noack, Joachim and Hüttman, Gereon and Paltauf, Günther},
   title = {Femtosecond Plasma-Mediated Nanosurgery of Cells and Tissues},
   booktitle = {Laser Ablation and Its Applications},
   editor = {Phipps, Claude},
   series = {Springer Series in Optical Sciences},
   publisher = {Springer US},
   volume = {129},
   chapter = {10},
   pages = {231-280},
   year = {2007}
}
M. Müller, H. Lacqua, and H. Hoerauf,
Evaluation of Cyclophotocoagulation Effects with 1310-nm Contact Optical Coherence Tomography, Curr Eye Res , vol. 32, pp. 171-176, 2007.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Müller,
   author = {Müller, M. and Winter, C. and Hüttmann, G. and Lacqua, H. and Hoerauf, H.},
   title = {Evaluation of Cyclophotocoagulation Effects with 1310-nm Contact Optical Coherence Tomography},
   journal = {Curr Eye Res},
   volume = {32},
   pages = {171-176},
   year = {2007}
}
C Framme,
Die Selektive Retina Therapie (SRT), Der Augenspiegel , vol. 53G1396, no. 11, 2007.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Framme,
   author = {Framme, C and Brinkmann, R},
   title = {Die Selektive Retina Therapie (SRT)},
   journal = {Der Augenspiegel},
   volume = {53G1396},
   number = {11},
   year = {2007}
}
E. Lankenau, D. Klinger, A. Malik, H. Müller, S. Oelckers, H. Pau, and T. Just,
Combining Optical Coherence Tomographie (OCT) with an operating microscope, in Medical Engineering , Buzug, T.M. and Holz, D. and Weber, S. and Bongartz, J. and Kohl-Bareise, M. and Hartmann, U., Eds. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 2007, pp. pp 343-348.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inbook{Lankenau,
   author = {Lankenau, E. and Klinger, D. and Winter, C. and Malik, A. and Müller, H.H. and Oelckers, S. and Pau, H.W. and Just, T. and Hüttmann, G.},
   title = {Combining Optical Coherence Tomographie (OCT) with an operating microscope},
   booktitle = {Medical Engineering},
   editor = {Buzug, T.M. and Holz, D. and Weber, S.  and Bongartz, J. and Kohl-Bareise, M. and Hartmann, U.},
   publisher = {Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York},
   pages = {pp 343-348},
   year = {2007}
}
M. Löning,
Physikalische Grundlagen optischer Technologien, Der Gynäkologe , vol. 40, no. 5, pp. 332-337, 2007.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Hüttmann2007,
   author = {Hüttmann, G. and Löning, M.},
   title = {Physikalische Grundlagen optischer Technologien},
   journal = {Der Gynäkologe},
   volume = {40},
   number = {5},
   pages = {332-337},
   year = {2007}
}
R. Rahmanzadeh, G. Hüttmann, J. Gerdes, and T. Scholzen,
Chromophore-assisted light inactivation of pKi-67 leads to inhibition of ribosomal RNA synthesis, Cell Prolif , vol. 40, no. 3, pp. 422-30, 2007.
DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2184.2007.00433.x
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Rahmanzadeh,
   author = {Rahmanzadeh, R. and Huttmann, G. and Gerdes, J. and Scholzen, T.},
   title = {Chromophore-assisted light inactivation of pKi-67 leads to inhibition of ribosomal RNA synthesis},
   journal = {Cell Prolif},
   volume = {40},
   number = {3},
   pages = {422-30},
   note = {Rahmanzadeh, R
Huttmann, G
Gerdes, J
Scholzen, T
England
Cell Prolif. 2007 Jun;40(3):422-30.},
   abstract = {OBJECTIVES: Expression of the nuclear Ki-67 protein (pKi-67) is strongly associated with cell proliferation. For this reason, antibodies against this protein are widely used as prognostic tools for the assessment of cell proliferation in biopsies from cancer patients. Despite this broad application in histopathology, functional evidence for the physiological role of pKi-67 is still missing. Recently, we proposed a function of pKi-67 in the early steps of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis. Here, we have examined the involvement of pKi-67 in this process by photochemical inhibition using chromophore-assisted light inactivation (CALI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Anti-pKi-67 antibodies were labelled with the fluorochrome fluorescein 5(6)-isothiocyanate and were irradiated after binding to their target protein. RESULTS: Performing CALI in vitro on cell lysates led to specific cross-linking of pKi-67. Moreover, the upstream binding factor (UBF) necessary for rRNA transcription was also partly subjected to cross-link formation, indicating a close spatial proximity of UBF and pKi-67. CALI in living cells, using micro-injected antibody, caused a striking relocalization of UBF from foci within the nucleoli to spots located at the nucleolar rim or within the nucleoplasm. pKi-67-CALI resulted in dramatic inhibition of RNA polymerase I-dependent nucleolar rRNA synthesis, whereas RNA polymerase II-dependent nucleoplasmic RNA synthesis remained almost unaltered. CONCLUSIONS: Our data presented here argue for a crucial role of pKi-67 in RNA polymerase I-dependent nucleolar rRNA synthesis.},
   keywords = {Antibodies, Antinuclear
Antibodies, Monoclonal
Cell Division/physiology
Cell Nucleolus/physiology
Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate
Fluorescent Dyes
HeLa Cells
Humans
Ki-67 Antigen/*genetics/*metabolism
Photochemistry
RNA Polymerase I/metabolism
RNA, Ribosomal/*biosynthesis},
   year = {2007}
}
V Ott, and R Keller,
Potential of a new cw 2µm laser scalpel for laparoscopic surgery, Med. Laser Appl. , vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 139-45, 2007.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Theisen-Kunde,
   author = {Theisen-Kunde, D and Ott, V and Brinkmann, R and Keller, R},
   title = {Potential of a new cw 2µm laser scalpel for laparoscopic surgery},
   journal = {Med. Laser Appl.},
   volume = {22},
   number = {2},
   pages = {139-45},
   abstract = {Abstract
The potential of a new continuous-wave (cw) thulium–YAG laser for laparoscopic small intestine resection was investigated in pigs in comparison to standard bipolar scissors.

Method
A diode-pumped solid-state thulium–YAG laser system emitting at a wavelength of 2.01 µm was used. Laser power up to 25 W in cw mode was transmitted via a quartz fibre (400 µm core diameter). In order to resect 1 m of the small intestine, the accompanied mesentery was dissected with both devices in 12 pigs (six each group). Arteries and veins of 0.25–3.2 mm inner diameter were dissected in vivo and the resistance of the occluded vessels to pressures up to 375 mmHg was measured by an in vitro set-up. Samples were prepared for histological evaluation.

Results
With respect to intestine resection with bipolar scissors, bleeding occurred significantly less (25%) and dissection time was reduced by 19% using the 2 µm laser scalpel. With the 2 µm laser scalpel, small vessels (<0.5 mm) were successfully occluded up to 100% (arteries) and 89% (veins), larger vessels (1–2.3 mm) to 74% (arteries) and 65% (veins) in vivo. In the in vitro pressure measurement with 375 mmHg, 30% of veins and 35% of arteries stayed closed. In conclusion, the first experiments show that the 2 µm laser scalpel is a promising dissection device for minimally invasive surgery. 
Zusammenfassung
In einer vergleichenden Tierstudie wurde das Potential eines neuen cw Thulium–YAG-Lasersystems mit dem einer kommerziell erhältlichen bipolaren Schere zur laparoskopischen Resektion des Dünndarms verglichen.

Methode
Es wurde ein diodengepumptes Thulium–YAG-Festkörper-Lasersystem mit einer Emissionswellenlänge von 2,01 µm verwendet. Die Laserleistung betrug 25 W (Dauerstrich) und die Laserstrahlung wurde mittels einer Quarzglasfaser (Kerndurchmesser 400 µm) zum Applikationsort transmittiert. Zur Entnahme von 1 m Dünndarm wurde zunächst mit beiden Dissektionsgeräten das angrenzende Mesenterium an 12 Schweinen (6 je Instrument) durchtrennt. Zur Untersuchung der Hämostaseeigenschaften des 2 µm Laserskalpells wurden ausgewählte Arterien und Venen mit einem inneren Durchmesser von 0,25 bis 3,2 mm in vivo durchtrennt. In einer anschließenden in vitro Untersuchung wurde der Gefäßverschluss mit einem Druck von 375 mmHg überprüft. Zur histologischen Auswertung wurden Gewebeproben entnommen, mittels H&E gefärbt und lichtmikroskopisch untersucht.

Ergebnisse
Im Vergleich zur konventionellen bipolaren Schere konnte in der durchgeführten Studie die Anzahl der auftretenden Blutungen mit dem 2 µm Laserskalpell signifikant (25%) und die gesamte Resektionszeit um 19% (nicht signifikant) reduziert werden. Die Hämostase von Gefäßen, welche mittels des 2 µm Laserskalpells durchtrennt wurden, betrug bei Durchmessern <0.5 mm 100% bei den Arterien und 89% bei den Venen. Bei größeren Gefäßen (1–2.3 mm innerer Durchmesser) wurden 74% der Arterien und 65% der Venen dauerhaft in vivo koaguliert. Bei den in vitro Untersuchungen der koagulierten Gefäße mit einem Druck von 375 mmHg waren noch insgesamt 35% der Arterien und 30% der Venen verschlossen.

In dieser Studie konnte gezeigt werden, dass das 2 µm Laserskalpell ein vielversprechendes Instrument für die laparoskopische Chirurgie darstellt.

Resúmen
En este estudio se investigó el potencial del nuevo láser cw thulium–YAG comparado al uso de la tijera bipolar estándar en intervenciones laparoscópicas en intestino delgado de cerdos.

Método
Se utilizó un láser thulium–YAG de estado sólido bombeado por diodos que emite en una longitud de onda de 2.01 µm. Una potencia láser de hasta 25 W de onda continua (cw) fue trasmitida a través de una fibra de cuarzo de 400 µm de diámetro. El mesenterio que acompaña al intestino delgado fue diseccionado utilizando uno de los dos sistemas en 12 cerdos (6 con cada instrumento). Se seccionaron in vivo, arterias y venas de 0.25 a 3.2 mm de diámetro interno y se midió in vitro la resistencia de los vasos ocluídos con una presión de hasta 375 mmHg. Las muestras fueron preparadas luego para evaluaciones histológicas.

Resultados
En la resección de intestino, el uso del bisturí láser de 2 µm ofrece menor sangrado (25%) y el reduce el tiempo de dissección en un 19% con respecto a las tijeras bipolares. Además, el uso del láser permite la oclusión in vivo de los pequeños vasos (diámetro menor a 0,5 mm) hasta en un 100% en arterias y un 89% en venas. Mientras que para las de mayor diámetro (de 1 a 2.3 mm) se obtuvo un 74% y 65%, respectivamente. En las mediciones in vitro de presión con 375 mmHg, un 30% de las venas y un 35% de las arterias permanecieron cerradas. En conclusión, estos primeros experimentos demuestran que el bisturí láser de 2 µm es una herramienta de disección prometedora para la cirugía laparoscópica. 

Keywords: Thulium laser; Minimally invasive; Vessel sealing; Laser scalpel
Schlüsselwörter: Thuliumlaser; Minimalinvasiv; Hämostase; Laserskalpell
Palabras clave: Thulium láser; Cirugía mínimamente invasiva; Oclusión de vasos; Bisturí láser},
   year = {2007}
}
V. Horneffer, N. Linz, and A. Vogel,
Principles of laser-induced separation and transport of living cells, J Biomed Opt , vol. 12, no. 5, pp. 054016, 2007.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Horneffer,
   author = {Horneffer, V. and Linz, N. and Vogel, A.},
   title = {Principles of laser-induced separation and transport of living cells},
   journal = {J Biomed Opt},
   volume = {12},
   number = {5},
   pages = {054016},
   note = {Horneffer, Verena
Linz, Norbert
Vogel, Alfred
Evaluation Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
United States
J Biomed Opt. 2007 Sep-Oct;12(5):054016.},
   abstract = {Separation and transport of defined populations of living cells grown on a thin membrane can be achieved by laser microdissection (LMD) of the sample of interest, followed by a laser-induced forward transport process [laser pressure "catapulting" (LPC)] of the dissected cell cluster. We investigate the dynamics of LMD and LPC with focused and defocused UV-A laser pulses by means of time-resolved photography. Catapulting is driven by plasma formation when tightly focused pulses are used, and by confined thermal ablation at the bottom of the sample for defocused catapulting. With both modalities, the initial specimen velocity amounts to about 50 to 60 ms. Time-resolved photography of live cell catapulting reveals that in defocused catapulting, strong shear forces arise when the sample is accelerated out of the culture medium covering the cells. By contrast, pulses focused at the periphery of the specimen cause a fast rotational movement that minimizes the flow of culture medium parallel to the sample surface, and thus the resulting shear stresses. Therefore, the recultivation rate of catapulted cells is much higher when focused pulses are used. Compared to collateral damage by mechanical forces, side effects by heat and UV exposure of the cells play only a minor role.},
   keywords = {Animals
CHO Cells
Cell Separation/ methods
Cricetinae
Cricetulus
Microdissection/ methods
Optical Tweezers
Specimen Handling/ methods},
   year = {2007}
}

Selective Retina Therapy (SRT), Z Med Phys , vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 6-22, 2007.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Brinkmann2007,
   author = {Brinkmann, R. and Birngruber, R.},
   title = {[Selective Retina Therapy (SRT)]},
   journal = {Z Med Phys},
   volume = {17},
   number = {1},
   pages = {6-22},
   note = {Brinkmann, Ralf
Birngruber, Reginald
English Abstract
Review
Germany
Z Med Phys. 2007;17(1):6-22.},
   abstract = {Selective Retina Therapy (SRT) is a new and very gentle laser method developed at the Medical Laser Center Lubeck. It is currently investigated clinically in order to treat retinal disorders associated with a decreased function of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). SRT is designed to selectively effect the RPE while sparing the neural retina and the photoreceptors as well as the chorioidea. Aim of the therapy is the rejuvenation of the RPE in the treated areas, which should ideally lead to a long term metabolic increase at the chorio-retinal junction. In contrast to conventional laser photocoagulation, which is associated with a complete thermal necrosis of the treated site, SRT completely retains full vision. This paper reviews the methods and mechanisms behind selective RPE effects and reports the first clinical results. An online dosimetry technique to visualize the ophthalmoscopically invisible effects is introduced.},
   keywords = {Humans
Laser Therapy
Pigment Epithelium of Eye/pathology
Regeneration
Retinal Diseases/pathology/surgery/ therapy},
   year = {2007}
}
C. Framme, C. Alt, S. Schnell, M. Sherwood, and C. Lin,
Selective targeting of the retinal pigment epithelium in rabbit eyes with a scanning laser beam, Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci , vol. 48, no. 4, pp. 1782-92, 2007.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Framme,
   author = {Framme, C. and Alt, C. and Schnell, S. and Sherwood, M. and Brinkmann, R. and Lin, C. P.},
   title = {Selective targeting of the retinal pigment epithelium in rabbit eyes with a scanning laser beam},
   journal = {Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci},
   volume = {48},
   number = {4},
   pages = {1782-92},
   note = {0146-0404 (Print)
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't},
   abstract = {PURPOSE: Selective targeting of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) with repetitive laser pulses that minimize thermal damage to the adjacent photoreceptors is a promising new therapeutic modality for RPE-related retinal diseases. The selectivity of an alternative, more versatile scanning approach was examined in vivo by using a broad range of scanning parameters. METHODS: Acousto-optic deflectors repeatedly scanned the focus of a continuous wave (cw)-laser across the retina of Dutch belted rabbits, producing microsecond irradiation at each RPE cell. Two irradiation patterns forming separated lines (SEP) or interlaced lines (INT), different dwell times (2.5-75 micros), and repetition numbers (10 and 100 scans with 100-Hz repetition rate) were tested. Thresholds were evaluated by fundus imaging and angiography. Histology was performed for selected parameters. RESULTS: Selective RPE cell damage was obtained with moderate laser power. The angiographic threshold power decreased with pulse duration, number of exposures, and applying the INT pattern. Ophthalmoscopic thresholds, indicating onset of thermal coagulation, were higher than twice the angiographic threshold for most tested parameters. Histology confirmed selective RPE cell damage for SEP irradiation with 7.5 and 15 micros; slower scan speeds or closed lines caused photoreceptor damage. CONCLUSIONS: A cw-laser scanner can be set up as a highly compact and versatile device. Selective RPE damage is feasible with dwell times up to 15 micros. Greatest selectivity is achieved with short exposure times and separated scan lines. Interlaced lines and long exposure times facilitate heat conduction into photoreceptors. A scanner is an attractive alternative for pulsed selective targeting, because both selective targeting and thermal photocoagulation can be realized.},
   keywords = {Animals
Eye Injuries/diagnosis
Fluorescein Angiography
Laser Coagulation/adverse effects/instrumentation/*methods
Ophthalmoscopy
Photoreceptors, Vertebrate/pathology
Pigment Epithelium of Eye/injuries/pathology/*surgery
Rabbits
Retina/injuries/pathology},
   year = {2007}
}
A Ramrath, and A Schweikard,
Towards Automated OCT-based Identification of White Brain Matter, in Bildverarbeitung für die Medizin 2007 , Horsch, Alexander and Deserno, ThomasM and Handels, Heinz and Meinzer, Hans-Peter and Tolxdorff, Thomas, Eds. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2007, pp. 414-418.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inbook{Ramrath,
   author = {Ramrath, L; Hofmann, U; Huettmann, G; Moser, A and Schweikard, A},
   title = {Towards Automated OCT-based Identification of White Brain Matter},
   booktitle = {Bildverarbeitung für die Medizin 2007},
   editor = {Horsch, Alexander and Deserno, ThomasM and Handels, Heinz and Meinzer, Hans-Peter and Tolxdorff, Thomas},
   series = {Informatik aktuell},
   publisher = {Springer Berlin Heidelberg},
   chapter = {83},
   pages = {414-418},
   year = {2007}
}
P. Steven, J. Rupp, G. Huettmann, N. Koop, and H. Laqua,
Two-Photon Real-Time Imaging of Conjunctiva-Associated Lymphoid Tissue (CALT), Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science , vol. 48, no. 13, pp. 201-201, 2007.
File:
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Steven2007,
   author = {Steven, P. and Rupp, J. and Huettmann, G. and Koop, N. and Laqua, H.},
   title = {Two-Photon Real-Time Imaging of Conjunctiva-Associated Lymphoid Tissue (CALT)},
   journal = {Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science},
   volume = {48},
   number = {13},
   pages = {201-201},
   abstract = {AbstractPurpose:: Immunological real-time analysis of conjunctiva-associated lymphoid tissue (CALT) is challenging at state. For the first time, two-photon microscopy, a new optical method, is evaluated in its use to analyze morphology and function of CALT. Methods:: Conjunctiva of female Balb/c mice is challenged with Chlamydia trachomatis serovar C (ChtC) or ovalbumin and choleratoxin subunit B (OVA/CTB) for CALT induction. A two-photon microscope equipped with a near infrared femtosecond-laser and a fluorescence-lifetime detector is used for ex-vivo analysis of unfixed and unstained ocular tissue with additional application of fluorescent microspheres to demonstrate transepithelial particle transport. Results:: Challenge with ChtC or OVA/CTB induce all CALT components (lymphoepithelium, follicles, blood and lymphatic vessels), that are demonstrated in cellular and subcellular resolution by means of autofluorescence imaging. Wavelength adaptation allows specific differentiation of cellular and acellular components. Fluorescence-lifetime detection permits differentiation of cellular subsets (e.g. lymphocytes and macrophages). Application of fluorescent microspheres demonstrates transepithelial particle transport and detection within intracellular vesicles. Conclusions:: Two-photonmicroscopy is an innovative optical technique to analyse morphological and functional features of CALT. Detection of transepithelial particle transport and its impact on conjunctival immunological processes can be visualized in real-time. Future in-vivo experiments with suitable animal models would allow detailed analysis of CALT in a clinical context e.g. corneal transplant rejection, keratoconjunctivitis sicca and follicular conjunctivitis.},
   ISSN = {1552-5783},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/},
   year = {2007},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
L. Kranendonk, R. Huber, J. Fujimoto, and S. Sanders,
Wavelength-agile H2O absorption spectrometer for thermometry of general combustion gases, Proceedings of the Combustion Institute , vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 783-790, 01 2007.
DOI:10.1016/j.proci.2006.08.003
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{KRANENDONK2007783,
title = {Wavelength-agile H2O absorption spectrometer for thermometry of general combustion gases},
journal = {Proceedings of the Combustion Institute},
volume = {31},
number = {1},
pages = {783-790},
year = {2007},
issn = {1540-7489},
doi = {https://doi.org/10.1016/j.proci.2006.08.003},
url = {https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1540748906002665},
author = {Laura A. Kranendonk and Robert Huber and James G. Fujimoto and Scott T. Sanders},
keywords = {Thermometry, Wavelength-agile, Absorption spectroscopy},
abstract = {Using a novel Fourier-domain mode-locking (FDML) laser scanning 1330–1380nm, we have developed a gas thermometer based on absorption spectroscopy that is appropriate for combustion gases at essentially arbitrary conditions. The path-integrated measurements are particularly useful in homogeneous environments, and here we present measurements in a controlled piston engine and a shock tube. Engine measurements demonstrate a RMS temperature precision of ±3% at 1500K and 200kHz bandwidth; the precision is improved dramatically by averaging. Initial shock tube measurements place the absolute accuracy of the thermometer within ∼2% to 1000K. The sensor performs best when significant H2O vapor is present, but requires only XH2OL>0.07cm at 300K, XH2OL>0.25cm at 1000K, or XH2OL>1.25cm at 3000K for 2% accurate thermometry, assuming a 4kHz measurement bandwidth (200kHz scans with 50 averages). The sensor also provides H2O mole fraction and shows potential for monitoring gas pressure based on the broadening of spectral features. To aid in designing other sensors based on high-temperature, high-pressure H2O absorption spectroscopy, a database of measured spectra is included.}
}
M. Löning, E. Lankenau, H. Diddens, M. Krokowski, and K. Diedrich,
Optische Kohärenztomographie in der Gynokologie, Der Gynäkologe , vol. 40, no. 5, 2007.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Löning,
   author = {Löning, M. and Lankenau, E. and Diddens, H. and Krokowski, M. and Diedrich, K. and Hüttmann, G.},
   title = {Optische Kohärenztomographie in der Gynokologie},
   journal = {Der Gynäkologe},
   volume = {40},
   number = {5},
   year = {2007}
}

2006

R. Huber, D. Adler, and J. Fujimoto,
Buffered Fourier domain mode locking: unidirectional swept laser sources for optical coherence tomography imaging at 370,000 lines/s, Opt. Lett. , vol. 31, no. 20, pp. 2975-2977, Oct. 2006. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OL.31.002975
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Huber:06,
author = {Robert Huber and Desmond C. Adler and James G. Fujimoto},
journal = {Opt. Lett.},
keywords = {Optical coherence tomography; Lasers, tunable; Amplified spontaneous emission; Fourier domain mode locking; Image quality; Laser sources; Optical coherence tomography; Swept sources},
number = {20},
pages = {2975--2977},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Buffered Fourier domain mode locking: unidirectional swept laser sources for optical coherence tomography imaging at 370,000 lines/s},
volume = {31},
month = {Oct},
year = {2006},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/ol/abstract.cfm?URI=ol-31-20-2975},
doi = {10.1364/OL.31.002975},
abstract = {We describe buffered Fourier domain mode locking (FDML), a technique for tailoring the output and multiplying the sweep rate of FDML lasers. Buffered FDML can be used to create unidirectional wavelength sweeps from the normal bidirectional sweeps in an FDML laser without sacrificing sweep rate. We also investigate the role of the laser source in dynamic range versus sensitivity performance in optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Unidirectional sweep rates of 370 kHz over a 100 nm range at a center wavelength of 1300 nm are achieved. High-speed, swept-source OCT is demonstrated at record speeds of up to 370,000 axial scans per second.},
}
M. Lenz, R. Huber, B. Schmidt, P. Gilch, R. Kalmbach, M. Engelhard, and J. Wachtveitl,
First steps of retinal photoisomerization in proteorhodopsin, Biophysical Journal , vol. 91, no. 1, pp. 255-262, 07 2006.
DOI:10.1529/biophysj.105.074690
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{LENZ2006255,
title = {First Steps of Retinal Photoisomerization in Proteorhodopsin},
journal = {Biophysical Journal},
volume = {91},
number = {1},
pages = {255-262},
year = {2006},
issn = {0006-3495},
doi = {https://doi.org/10.1529/biophysj.105.074690},
url = {https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006349506717258},
author = {Martin O. Lenz and Robert Huber and Bernhard Schmidt and Peter Gilch and Rolf Kalmbach and Martin Engelhard and Josef Wachtveitl},
abstract = {The early steps (<1ns) in the photocycle of the detergent solubilized proton pump proteorhodopsin are analyzed by ultrafast spectroscopic techniques. A comparison to the first primary events in reconstituted proteorhodopsin as well as to the well known archaeal proton pump bacteriorhodopsin is given. A dynamic Stokes shift observed in fs-time-resolved fluorescence experiments allows a direct observation of early motions on the excited state potential energy surface. The initial dynamics is dominated by sequentially emerging stretching (<150fs) and torsional (∼300fs) modes of the retinal. The different protonation states of the primary proton acceptor Asp-97 drastically affect the reaction rate and the overall quantum efficiencies of the isomerization reactions, mainly evidenced for time scales above 1ps. However, no major influence on the fast time scales (∼150fs) could be seen, indicating that the movement out of the Franck-Condon region is fairly robust to electrostatic changes in the retinal binding pocket. Based on fs-time-resolved absorption and fluorescence spectra, ground and exited state contributions can be disentangled and allow to construct a reaction model that consistently explains pH-dependent effects in solubilized and reconstituted proteorhodopsin.}
}
R. Huber, M. Wojtkowski, and J. Fujimoto,
Fourier domain mode locking (FDML): Three-dimensional OCT imaging at 906 frames per second, in 2006 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics and 2006 Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference , IEEE, 052006. pp. 1-2.
DOI:10.1109/CLEO.2006.4627914
Bibtex: BibTeX
@INPROCEEDINGS{4627914,
  author={Huber, R. and Wojtkowski, M. and Fujimoto, J. G.},
  booktitle={2006 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics and 2006 Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference}, 
  title={Fourier Domain Mode Locking (FDML): Three-dimensional OCT imaging at 906 frames per second}, 
  year={2006},
  volume={},
  number={},
  pages={1-2},
  abstract={Fourier domain mode locking is a new operation regime of lasers. Highly chirped frequency swept waveforms rather than short pulses are generated. The mechanism and its application for ultrahigh-speed biomedical OCT imaging are discussed.},
  keywords={},
  doi={10.1109/CLEO.2006.4627914},
  ISSN={2160-9004},
  month={May},}
R. Huber, M. Wojtkowski, and J. Fujimoto,
Fourier Domain Mode Locking (FDML): A new laser operating regime and applications for optical coherence tomography, Optics Express , vol. 14, no. 8, pp. 3225 - 3237, 04 2006.
DOI:10.1364/OE.14.003225
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Huber:06,
author = {R. Huber and M. Wojtkowski and J. G. Fujimoto},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Optical coherence tomography; Lasers, tunable; Frequency modulated lasers; Full field optical coherence tomography; Laser operation; Light fields; Medical imaging; Mode locking},
number = {8},
pages = {3225--3237},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Fourier Domain Mode Locking (FDML): A new laser operating regime and applications for optical coherence tomography},
volume = {14},
month = {Apr},
year = {2006},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-14-8-3225},
doi = {10.1364/OE.14.003225},
abstract = {We demonstrate a new technique for frequency-swept laser operation--Fourier domain mode locking (FDML)--and its application for swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. FDML is analogous to active laser mode locking for short pulse generation, except that the spectrum rather than the amplitude of the light field is modulated. High-speed, narrowband optical frequency sweeps are generated with a repetition period equal to the fundamental or a harmonic of cavity round-trip time. An FDML laser is constructed using a long fiber ring cavity, a semiconductor optical amplifier, and a tunable fiber Fabry-Perot filter. Effective sweep rates of up to 290 kHz are demonstrated with a 105 nm tuning range at 1300 nm center wavelength. The average output power is 3 mW directly from the laser and 20 mW after post-amplification. Using the FDML laser for swept-source OCT, sensitivities of 108 dB are achieved and dynamic linewidths are narrow enough to enable imaging over a 7 mm depth with only a 7.5 dB decrease in sensitivity. We demonstrate swept-source OCT imaging with acquisition rates of up to 232,000 axial scans per second. This corresponds to 906 frames/second with 256 transverse pixel images, and 3.5 volumes/second with a 256{\texttimes}128{\texttimes}256 voxel element 3-D OCT data set. The FDML laser is ideal for swept-source OCT imaging, thus enabling high imaging speeds and large imaging depths.},
}
L. Kranendonk, J. Walewski, S. Sanders, and R. Huber,
"Measurements of Gas Temperature in a HCCI Engine Using a Fourier Domain Mode Locking Laser" SAE Technical Paper 2006-01-1366, 04 2006.
DOI:10.4271/2006-01-1366
Bibtex: BibTeX
@TechReport{HU_2006_Kranendonk_a,
  Title                    = {{Measurements of Gas Temperature in a HCCI Engine Using a Fourier Domain Mode Locking Laser}},
  Author                   = {Kranendonk, Laura A and Walewski, Joachim W and Sanders, Scott T and Huber, Robert and Fujimoto, James G},
  Year                     = {2006},
  Month                    = apr,
  pages  = {1366 1--5},
  Doi                      = {10.4271/2006-01-1366},
keywords = {AG-Huber_FDML, AG-Huber_OCT},
  Url                      = {http://www.sae.org/technical/papers/2006-01-1366}
}
K. Taira, R. Huber, M. Wojtkowski, and J. Fujimoto,
Fourier domain mode-locked lasers for swept source OCT imaging at up to 290 kHz scan rates, in Coherence Domain Optical Methods and Optical Coherence Tomography in Biomedicine X , Valery V. Tuchin and Joseph A. Izatt and James G. Fujimoto, Eds. SPIE, 022006. pp. 60790U.
DOI:10.1117/12.648880
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{10.1117/12.648880,
author = {R. Huber and K. Taira and M. Wojtkowski and J. G. Fujimoto},
title = {{Fourier domain mode-locked lasers for swept source OCT imaging at up to 290 kHz scan rates}},
volume = {6079},
booktitle = {Coherence Domain Optical Methods and Optical Coherence Tomography in Biomedicine X},
editor = {Valery V. Tuchin and Joseph A. Izatt and James G. Fujimoto},
organization = {International Society for Optics and Photonics},
publisher = {SPIE},
pages = {60790U},
abstract = {A new type of laser operation, Fourier Domain Mode Locking (FDML), is demonstrated for high performance, frequency swept light sources.  FDML achieves superior sweep speeds, coherence lengths and bandwidths compared to standard bulk or fiber lasers.  At 1300 nm a sweep range up to 145 nm, up to 4 cm delay length, and sweep rates up to 290 kHz were achieved.  This light source is demonstrated for swept source OCT imaging.},
keywords = {Fourier Domain Mode Locking, swept laser, tunable laser, wavelength agile, optical coherence tomography, spectral domain, Fourier domain, fiber laser},
year = {2006},
doi = {10.1117/12.648880},
URL = {https://doi.org/10.1117/12.648880}
}
L. Kranendonk, J. Walewski, S. Sanders, R. Huber, and J. Fujimoto,
Measurements of Gas Temperature in an HCCI Engine by Use of a Fourier-Domain Mode-Locking Laser, in Laser Applilcations to Chemical, Security and Environmental Analysis , Optica Publishing Group, 022006. pp. TuB2.
DOI:10.1364/LACSEA.2006.TuB2
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Kranendonk:06,
author = {Laura A. Kranendonk and Joachim W. Walewski and Scott T. Sanders and Robert Huber and James G. Fujimoto},
booktitle = {Laser Applilcations to Chemical, Security and Environmental Analysis},
journal = {Laser Applilcations to Chemical, Security and Environmental Analysis},
keywords = {Lasers and laser optics; Diode lasers; Lasers, tunable; Laser operation; Laser sensors; Lasers; Mode locking; Spontaneous emission; Tunable diode lasers},
pages = {TuB2},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Measurements of gas temperature in an HCCI engine by use of a Fourier-domain mode-locking laser},
year = {2006},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/abstract.cfm?URI=LACSEA-2006-TuB2},
doi = {10.1364/LACSEA.2006.TuB2},
abstract = {Initial measurements of water vapor temperature by use of a Fourier-domain mode-locking laser were performed in a homogenous charge compression ignition engine. We assessed the potential of this FDML laser in combustion applications.},
}
J. Neumann,
Cell disintegration by laser-induced transient microbubbles and its simultaneous monitoring by interferometry, Journal of Biomedical Optics , vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 041112-1 - 041112-11, 2006.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Neumann,
   author = {Neumann, J. and Brinkmann, R},
   title = {Cell disintegration by laser-induced transient microbubbles and its simultaneous monitoring by interferometry},
   journal = {Journal of Biomedical Optics},
   volume = {11},
   number = {4},
   pages = {041112-1 - 041112-11},
   year = {2006}
}
T Narumi, Y Hayashi, S Ataka, R Tanaka, M Murasawa, T Kohno, and K Shiraki,
Blunt ocular trauma in a patient with hemophilia-A, Japanese Journal of Clinical Ophthalmology , vol. 60, no. 9, pp. 1653-1656, 2006.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Hayashi,
   author = {Narumi, T and Hayashi, Y and Ataka, S and Tanaka, R and Murasawa, M and Kohno, T and Shiraki, K},
   title = {Blunt ocular trauma in a patient with hemophilia-A},
   journal = {Japanese Journal of Clinical Ophthalmology},
   volume = {60},
   number = {9},
   pages = {1653-1656},
   abstract = {Purpose?To report a patient with hemophilia-A who was treated by recombinant factor VIII concentrate for trauma-induced hyphema. Case and Findings?A 18-year-old male was hit by a flying softball on his left eye. He noted pain and blurring of left vision. When seen the next day,his visual acuity was hand motion left with intraocular pressure?IOP?of 37mmHg. The left cornea was edematous. The anterior chamber was filled with blood. He was diagnosed with hemophilia A with factor VIII level of 3?. His bleeding time was within normal limit. Irrigation of anterior was performed without incident after intravenous injection of recombinant factor VIII concentrate. Vitreous hemorrhage started to be absorbed 3 weeks after the trauma. Visual acuity improved to 0.02 5 weeks and to 1.5 9 weeks after trauma. Conclusion?Systemic recombinant factor VIII concentrate seemed to facilitate irrigation of anterior chamber and spontaneous absorption of vitreous hemorrhage in a patient with hemophilia-A.},
   year = {2006}
}
D. Daniltchenko,
Anwendung der optischen Kohärenztomographie (OCT) bei der Darstellung von Urothelerkrankungen der Harnblase, Der Radiologe , vol. 46, no. 7, pp. 584, 2006.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Daniltchenko,
   author = {Daniltchenko, D.},
   title = {Anwendung der optischen Kohärenztomographie (OCT) bei der Darstellung von Urothelerkrankungen der Harnblase},
   journal = {Der Radiologe},
   volume = {46},
   number = {7},
   pages = {584},
   year = {2006}
}
E Hishida, Y. Hayashi, T Narumi, and K. Shiraki,
A case of Tolosa-Hunt syndrome with optic neuritis and impaired visual acuity, Japanese Journal of Clinical Ophthalmology , vol. 60, no. 6, pp. 943-946, 2006.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Hayashi2006,
   author = {Hishida, E and Hayashi, Y. and Narumi, T and Shiraki, K.},
   title = {A case of Tolosa-Hunt syndrome with optic neuritis and impaired visual acuity},
   journal = {Japanese Journal of Clinical Ophthalmology},
   volume = {60},
   number = {6},
   pages = {943-946},
   abstract = {Purpose?To report a case of Tolosa-Hunt syndrome with optic neuritis and impaired visual acuity. Case and Findings?A 31-year-old woman presented with retrobulbar pain in her left eye. Her corrected visual acuity was 1.2 right and 0.8 left. The left eye developed total ophthalmoplegia with visual acuity of 0.08 four days later. She was diagnosed with Tolosa-Hunt syndrome with optic neuritis. Pulsed corticosteroid therapy induced improved ocular motility with reduced pain. Visual acuity improved to 0.7. Discontinuation of corticosteroid was followed by severe recurrence. Left visual acuity was reduced to no light perception. Another course of pulsed corticosteroid therapy with peroral prednisolone induced improvement. There has been no recurrence until 9months later. Conclusion?Pulsed corticosteroid therapy with peroral prednisolone may be useful in preventing recurrence of optic neuritis in Tolosa-Hunt syndrome.},
   year = {2006}
}
A. Vogel, J. Noack, N. Linz, S. Freidank, and G. Paltauf,
Femtosecond laser nanosurgery of biological cells and tissues, in 4th International Congress on Laser Advanced Materials Processing , 2006.
File: download
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Vogel-2006,
   author = {Vogel, A. and Noack, J. and Hüttmann, G. and Linz, N. and Freidank, S. and Paltauf, G.},
   title = {Femtosecond laser nanosurgery of biological cells and tissues},
   booktitle = {4th International Congress on Laser Advanced Materials Processing},
Year = { 2006},
URL = { http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.713.4169&rep=rep1&type=pdf}
}
S Ueda, Y Hayashi, T Kohno, N Miki, E Hishida, and K Shiraki,
A case of pachymeningitis with impaired ocular motility., Japanese Journal of Clinical Ophthalmology , vol. 60, no. 4, pp. 553-557, 2006.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Hayashi,
   author = {Ueda, S and Hayashi, Y and Kohno, T and Miki, N and Hishida, E and Shiraki, K},
   title = {A case of pachymeningitis with impaired ocular motility.},
   journal = {Japanese Journal of Clinical Ophthalmology},
   volume = {60},
   number = {4},
   pages = {553-557},
   year = {2006}
}
A. Vogel, I. Apitz, S. Freidank, and R. Dijkink,
Sensitive high-resolution white-light Schlieren technique with a large dynamic range for the investigation of ablation dynamics, Opt. Lett. , vol. 31, pp. 1812-1814, 2006.
File: OL.31.001812
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Vogel2006-1,
   author = {Vogel, A. and Apitz, I. and Freidank, S. and Dijkink, R.},
   title = {Sensitive high-resolution white-light Schlieren technique with a large dynamic range for the investigation of ablation dynamics},
   journal = {Opt. Lett.},
   volume = {31},
   pages = {1812-1814},
   year = { 2006},
url = { https://doi.org/10.1364/OL.31.001812}
}
G. Schuele, J. Neumann, C. Framme, E. Pörkensen, H. Elsner, and J. Roider,
Selektive Retina Therapie - Methodik, Technik und Online-Dosimetrie, Ophthalmologe , vol. 103, pp. 839-849, 2006.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Brinkmann2006,
   author = {Brinkmann, R and Schuele, G. and Neumann, J. and Framme, C. and Pörkensen, E. and Elsner, H. and Theisen-Kunde, D and Roider, J. and Birngruber, R.},
   title = {Selektive Retina Therapie - Methodik, Technik und Online-Dosimetrie},
   journal = {Ophthalmologe},
   volume = {103},
   pages = {839-849},
   year = { 2006}
}
J Kandulla, H Elsner, and J Sandeau,
Non-invasive optoacoustic temperature determination during retinal cw-laser treatments, in Proc SPIE , 2006. pp. 336-343.
File: 12.674409
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Kandulla2006,
   author = {Kandulla, J and Elsner, H and Sandeau, J and Birngruber, R and Brinkmann, R},
   title = {Non-invasive optoacoustic temperature determination during retinal cw-laser treatments},
   booktitle = {Proc SPIE},
   volume = {6138},
   pages = {336-343},
   type = {Conference Proceedings},
year = { 2006},
url = { https://doi.org/10.1117/12.674409}
}
A. Giese, H. Böhringer, J. Leppert, S. Kandelhardt, E. Lankenau, and P. Koch,
Non-invasive intraoperative optical coherence tomography of the resection cavity during surgery of intrinsic brain tumors., Proc SPIE , vol. 6078, pp. 495-502, 2006.
File: 12.674436.short
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Giese2006,
   author = {Giese, A. and Böhringer, H.J. and Leppert, J. and Kandelhardt, S.R. and Lankenau, E. and Koch, P. and Birngruber, R. and Hüttmann, G.},
   title = {Non-invasive intraoperative optical coherence tomography of the resection cavity during surgery of intrinsic brain tumors.},
   journal = {Proc SPIE},
   volume = {6078},
   pages = {495-502},
   year = { 2006},
url = {https://www.spiedigitallibrary.org/conference-proceedings-of-spie/6078/60782Z/Non-invasive-intraoperative-optical-coherence-tomography-of-the-resection-cavity/10.1117/12.674436.short},
   type = {Proceeding}
}
J. Sandeau, G. Caillibotte, J. Kandulla, and G. Apiou-Sbirlea,
Modeling of conductive and convective heat transfers in retinal laser treatments, 2006. pp. 61381A-61381A-9.
File: 12.673494
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Sandeau2006,
   author = {Sandeau, Julien and Caillibotte, Georges and Kandulla, Jochen and Birngruber, Reginald and Apiou-Sbirlea, Gabriela},
   title = {Modeling of conductive and convective heat transfers in retinal laser treatments},
   volume = {6138},
   pages = {61381A-61381A-9},
   note = {10.1117/12.673494},
   abstract = {Tumor thermo treatment such as photodynamic therapy (PDT) or transpupillary thermotherapy (TTT) deal with long term and large laser spot exposures. The induced temperature increase is not exactly known [1]. Under these conditions convective heat transfers due to the blood flow in the choroid and the choriocapillaris must be considered in addition to the usually calculated heat conduction. From an existing analytical model defining a unique convective term for the whole fundus irradiated with Gaussian irradiance distribution lasers [2], we developed a numerical one allowing a precise modelling of convection and calculating heating evolution and temperature profiles of the fundus of the eye. The aim of this study is to present the modelling and several comparisons between experimental results [3] and numerical ones concerning the convective heat transfers inside the fundus of the eye.},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.673494},
   type = {Conference Proceedings},
year = { 2006}
}
A. Vogel, J Noack, and G. Paltauf,
Femtosecond plasma-mediated nanosurgery of cells and tissues., in Laser Ablation , ), Phipps C (Hrsg., Eds. Springer, Heidelberg, 2006, pp. 217-262.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inbook{Vogel2006-2,
   author = {Vogel, A. and Noack, J and Hüttmann, G. and Paltauf, G.},
   title = {Femtosecond plasma-mediated nanosurgery of cells and tissues.},
   booktitle = {Laser Ablation},
   editor = {), Phipps C (Hrsg.},
   publisher = { Springer, Heidelberg},
   pages = {217-262},
   year = { 2006}
}
J. Roider,
Selective retina therapy (SRT): a review on methods, techniques, preclinical and first clinical results, Bull Soc Belge Ophtalmol , no. 302, pp. 51-69, 2006.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Brinkmann2006-2,
   author = {Brinkmann, R. and Roider, J. and Birngruber, R.},
   title = {Selective retina therapy (SRT): a review on methods, techniques, preclinical and first clinical results},
   journal = {Bull Soc Belge Ophtalmol},
   number = {302},
   pages = {51-69},
   note = {0081-0746 (Print)
Journal Article
Review},
   abstract = {Selective retina therapy (SRT) is a new laser procedure for retinal diseases that are thought to be associated with a degradation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The aim of the irradiation is to selectively damage the RPE without affecting the neural retina, the photoreceptors and the choroid. Goal of the treatment is to stimulate RPE cell migration and proliferation into the irradiated areas in order to improve the metabolism at the diseased retinal sites. In a pilot study more than 150 patients with soft drusen, retinopathia centralis serosa (RCS) and macular edema were treated. The first 3-center international trial targets diabetic macular edema and branch vein occlusion. In this review, selective RPE effects are motivated and two modalities to achieve selective RPE effects will be introduced: a pulsed and a continuous wave scanning mode. The mechanism behind selective RPE-effects will be discussed reviewing in vitro results and temperature calculations. So far clinical SRT is performed by applying trains of 30 laser pulses from a Nd:YLF-Laser (527 nm, 1.7 micros, 100 Hz) to the diseased fundus areas. In the range of 450-800 mJ/cm(2) per pulse, RPE-defects in patients were proved angiographically by fluorescein or ICG-leakage. The selectivity with respect to surrounding highly sensitive tissue and the safety range of the treatment will be reviewed. With the laser parameters used neither bleeding nor scotoma, proved by microperimetry, were observed thus demonstrating no adverse effects to the choroid and the photoreceptors, respectively. During and after irradiation, it shows that the irradiated locations are ophthalmoscopically invisible, since the effects are very limited and confined to the RPE, thus a dosimetry control is demanded. We report on a non-invasive opto-acoustic on-line technique to monitor successful RPE-irradiation and compare the data to those achieved with standard angiography one-hour post treatment.},
   keywords = {Fluorescein Angiography
Humans
Laser Coagulation/adverse effects/*methods
Multicenter Studies
Perimetry
Pigment Epithelium of Eye/pathology/surgery
Retinal Diseases/diagnosis/pathology/*surgery
Scotoma/etiology/prevention & control},
   year = {  2006}
}
C. Framme, H. Sachs, and B. Flucke,
Evaluation of the new photosensitizer Tookad (WST09) for photodynamic vessel occlusion of the choroidal tissue in rabbits, Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci , vol. 47, no. 12, pp. 5437-46, 2006.
File: query.fcgi
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Framme2006,
   author = {Framme, C. and Sachs, H. G. and Flucke, B. and Theisen-Kunde, D. and Birngruber, R.},
   title = {Evaluation of the new photosensitizer Tookad (WST09) for photodynamic vessel occlusion of the choroidal tissue in rabbits},
   journal = {Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci},
   volume = {47},
   number = {12},
   pages = {5437-46},
   note = {0146-0404 (Print)
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't},
   abstract = {PURPOSE: To determine the efficacy of Tookad (WST09; Negma-Lerads, Magny-Les-Hameaux, France) photodynamic therapy (T-PDT) by evaluating the angiographic and histologic closure of choroidal vessels at different radiance exposures, drug dosages, and intervals between photosensitizer injection and laser application in a rabbit model. METHODS: Chinchilla Bastard rabbits were injected intravenously with three different dye concentrations (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg) before application of light. In every group T-PDT was performed at four different times after injection: 5, 15, 30, and 60 minutes with different radiance exposures ranging from 200 to 3 J/cm2. Fundus photographs and fluorescein angiograms were obtained 90 minutes after injection. Follow-up angiographies were performed at days 1, 3, 7, and 14 after initial treatment. Histology was performed in selected cases immediately after treatment and on days 1, 3, and 7. RESULTS: Immediately after irradiation, most of the visible lesions were angiographically hyperfluorescent due to damaged vessel endothelium and associated RPE damage. Lesions from high-radiance exposures revealed immediate hypofluorescence, indicating vessel closure. Hypofluorescent lesions appeared mainly during day 1 (all lesions angiographically visible, some hypofluorescent) to day 3 (all lesions hypofluorescent) after treatment. At day 7, ophthalmoscopically visible hyperpigmentation took place in all lesions. ED50 thresholds for angiographic hypofluorescence determined at day 3 after treatment with 2.5 mg/kg were 18.8 J/cm2 (5 minutes), 62.0 J/cm2 (15 minutes), and >100 J/cm2 (30 minutes); with 5 mg/kg, 8.4 J/cm2 (5 minutes), 22.8 J/cm2 (15 minutes), 54.5 J/cm2 (30 minutes), and >100 J/cm2 (60 minutes); and with 10 mg/kg, 11.7 J/cm2 (30 minutes) and 54.1 J/cm2 (60 minutes). Histology of the angiographically hypofluorescent lesions revealed vessel thrombosis in all groups 1 hour after PDT up to 7 days after treatment. Sparing of photoreceptors indicated selectivity of T-PDT; however, slight damage was partly observable. After 7 days, localized proliferation of the RPE cells was noted and was enhanced 14 days after treatment. CONCLUSIONS: T-PDT has the potential to achieve selective choroidal vessel occlusion with proper parameter selection, such as (1) 2.5 mg/kg, 5 minutes, 100 J/cm2; (2) 5 mg/kg, 5 minutes, 25 J/cm2; or (3) 5 mg/kg, 15 minutes, 50 J/cm2; however, slight damage to the photoreceptors cannot be ruled out. RPE proliferation indicates primary RPE damage due to PDT, also described with the use of all other photosensitizers.},
   keywords = {Animals
Bacteriochlorophylls/*administration & dosage
Choroid/*blood supply/drug effects/pathology
Choroidal Neovascularization/diagnosis/*drug therapy
Drug Evaluation, Preclinical
Fluorescein Angiography
*Photochemotherapy
Photosensitizing Agents/*administration & dosage
Rabbits},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=17122134},
   year = {2006},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
C. Framme, and B. Flucke,
Comparison of reduced and standard light application in photodynamic therapy of the eye in two rabbit models, Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol , vol. 244, no. 7, pp. 773-81, 2006.
File: query.fcgi
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Famme2006,
   author = {Framme, C. and Flucke, B. and Birngruber, R.},
   title = {Comparison of reduced and standard light application in photodynamic therapy of the eye in two rabbit models},
   journal = {Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol},
   volume = {244},
   number = {7},
   pages = {773-81},
   note = {0721-832X (Print)
Comparative Study
Journal Article},
   abstract = {BACKGROUND: Current PDT treatment for age-related macular degeneration uses a standard radiant exposure of 50 J/cm(2) at an irradiance of 600 mW/cm(2). However; there is a general problem with the unusually high irradiance; in fact, the rate of photochemical production of singlet oxygen may be limited by insufficiently oxygenized neovascular tissue. It was the aim of this study to evaluate the efficacy of verteporfin (Visudyne) photoactivation to induce thrombosis of choriocapillaries and in experimentally induced corneal neovascularizations in rabbits by varying irradiance and retinal radiant exposure. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The light-dose threshold to induce micro-thrombosis in the choriocapillaries (seven eyes) and in corneal neovascularizations (eight eyes) of Chinchilla-Bastard rabbits using different retinal irradiances (100 and 600 mW/cm(2)) at different radiant exposures (20, 10, 5, 2.5, 1.25, 0.62, and 0.3 J/cm(2)) was evaluated. Induction of neovascularizations was performed 7 days prior to PDT treatment using intracorneal silk sutures. A dose of 2 mg/kg verteporfin was intravenously infused 10 min before standard PDT. The criterion for vascular thrombosis was vessel closure as determined by fluorescein angiography 1 h and 1 day post exposure. RESULTS: Experiments on the choroid revealed vessel closure 1 h after irradiation at ED(50) = 10.8 J/cm(2) (both 600 and 100 mW/cm(2)) and after 24 h at ED(50) = 2.4 J/cm(2) (600 mW/cm(2)) versus 1.8 J/cm(2) (100 mW/cm(2)). Vessel closure was enhanced at irradiation with 100 mW/cm(2). Regarding corneal neovascularizations, vessel thrombosis was observable by dark appearance of irradiated clotted neovascular tissue and angiographically by a lack of leakage at ED(50) thresholds of 0.62 J/cm(2) (1 h) and 0.41 J/cm(2) (1 day) for 100 mW/cm(2) and of 0.99 J/cm(2) (1 h), and 0.67 J/cm(2) (1 day) for 600 mW/cm(2). Thus in both experiments thresholds for vessel closure were reduced by a factor of 1.5 for the lower intensity. Histology revealed more selective vessel occlusion without RPE and photoreceptor damage for 100 mW/cm(2) rather than 600 mW/cm(2) intensity at threshold irradiation. CONCLUSION: Low-intensity PDT with verteporfin for neovascular tissue seems to be more effective than regular high-intensity PDT. Future preclinical trials should address the issue of proper dosimetry for effective PDT in age-related macular degeneration.},
   keywords = {Animals
Choroidal Neovascularization/*drug therapy
Corneal Neovascularization/*drug therapy
*Disease Models, Animal
Fluorescein Angiography
Photochemotherapy/*methods
Photosensitizing Agents/*therapeutic use
Porphyrins/*therapeutic use
Rabbits
Radiation Dosage},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=16440207},
   year = {2006},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
S Tamaoki, Y Hayashi, H Sakaguchi, N Tanaka, M Ota, T Yokoyama, and K Shiraki,
Retinoblastoma in the patient with 13q-syndrome: a report of two cases., Japanese Review of Clinical Ophthalmology , vol. 100, no. 8, pp. 587-590, 2006.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Hayashi,
   author = {Tamaoki, S and Hayashi, Y and Sakaguchi, H and Tanaka, N and Ota, M and Yokoyama, T and Shiraki, K},
   title = {Retinoblastoma in the patient with 13q-syndrome: a report of two cases.},
   journal = {Japanese Review of Clinical Ophthalmology},
   volume = {100},
   number = {8},
   pages = {587-590},
   year = {2006}
}
C. Klatt, H. Elsner, E. Porksen, A. Bunse, and J. Roider,
Selektive Retina-Therapie bei Retinopathia centralis serosa mit Pigmentepithelabhebung, Ophthalmologe , vol. 103, no. 10, pp. 850-855, 2006.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Klatt,
   author = {Klatt, C. and Elsner, H. and Porksen, E. and Brinkmann, R. and Bunse, A. and Birngruber, R. and Roider, J.},
   title = {Selektive Retina-Therapie bei Retinopathia centralis serosa mit Pigmentepithelabhebung},
   journal = {Ophthalmologe},
   volume = {103},
   number = {10},
   pages = {850-855},
   note = {0941-293X (Print)
Clinical Trial
English Abstract
Journal Article},
   month = {Aug},
   abstract = {Selective Retina Therapy (SRT) is a new laser treatment that selectively targets the retinal pigmen epithelium (RPE). In this study, we treated 39 patients presenting with nonischemic, focal and focal-diffuse diabetic maculopathy with SRT. In the main. the results indicate that SRT had stabilizing effects on visual acuity, angiographic leakage, lipid exudation, and foveal retinal thickness. SRT is safe and is especially useful for treating pathologies that are located close to the fovea, which cannot be treated with conventional argon laser photocoagulation.},
   keywords = {Aged
Diabetic Retinopathy/*surgery
Female
Humans
Laser Surgery/*methods
Lasers/*therapeutic use
Macular Degeneration/*surgery
Male
Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures/*methods
Preoperative Care/methods
Treatment Outcome},
   year = {2006}
}
R. Brinkmann,
Selektive Retina-Therapie (SRT), Zeitschrift für Medizinische Physik , vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 6-22, 2006.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Brinkmann2006-1,
   author = {Brinkmann, Ralf and Birngruber, Reginald},
   title = {Selektive Retina-Therapie (SRT)},
   journal = {Zeitschrift für Medizinische Physik},
   volume = {17},
   number = {1},
   pages = {6-22},
   abstract = {Zusammenfassung Die am Medizinischen Laserzentrum Lübeck entwickelte selektive Retina-Therapie (SRT) wird zur Zeit als neue, schonende Laser-Behandlungsmethode für verschiedene Erkrankungen des Augenhintergrunds evaluiert, deren Ursachen einer Degradation des Retinalen Pigmentepithels (RPE) zugeschrieben werden. Mit der SRT lässt sich selektiv das RPE behandeln, ohne die angrenzende neurosensorische Netzhaut mit den Photorezeptoren und die unter dem RPE liegende Aderhaut (Choroidea) zu beeinträchtigen. Die Therapie führt idealerweise zu einer Regeneration des RPEs und einem gesteigerten Metabolismus am chorio-retinalen Übergang. Im Gegensatz zur etablierten Laserphotokoagulation, bei der die Netzhaut in und um die bestrahlten Areale komplett verödet wird, bleibt bei der SRT die Sehfähigkeit der Patienten in den bestrahlten Arealen erhalten. Der Artikel gibt einen Überblick über die Idee und die physikalischen Mechanismen selektiver RPE-Behandlung, die online Dosimetrie der optisch nicht sichtbaren Effekte und fasst die ersten klinischen Ergebnisse zusammen. Selective Retina Therapy (SRT) is a new and very gentle laser method developed at the Medical Laser Center Lübeck. It is currently investigated clinically in order to treat retinal disorders associated with a decreased function of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). SRT is designed to selectively effect the RPE while sparing the neural retina and the photoreceptors as well as the chorioidea. Aim of the therapy is the rejuvenation of the RPE in the treated areas, which should ideally lead to a long term metabolic increase at the chorio-retinal junction. In contrast to conventional laser photocoagulation, which is associated with a complete thermal necrosis of the treated site, SRT completely retains full vision. This paper reviews the methods and mechanisms behind selective RPE effects and reports the first clinical results. An online dosimetry technique to visualize the ophthalmoscopically invisible effects is introduced.},
   keywords = {Selektive Zelleffekte, Optoakustik, Mikroblasen, Online-Dosimetrie, RPE, ?s-Laserpulse, Makulaödeme, RCS
Selective cellular effects, optoacoustics, online dosimetry, RPE, ?s-laser pulses, macula oedema, RCS},
   year = { 2006}
}
H. Elsner, C. Klatt, S. Liew, E. Porksen, A. Bunse, M. Rudolf, R. Hamilton, H. Laqua, and J. Roider,
Selektive Retina Therapiey (SRT) bei Patienten mit diabetischer Makulopathie, Ophthalmologe , vol. 103, no. 10, pp. 856-860, 2006.
File: query.fcgi
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Elsner2006,
   author = {Elsner, H. and Klatt, C. and Liew, S. H. and Porksen, E. and Bunse, A. and Rudolf, M. and Brinkmann, R. and Hamilton, R. P. and Birngruber, R. and Laqua, H. and Roider, J.},
   title = {Selektive Retina Therapiey (SRT) bei Patienten mit diabetischer Makulopathie},
   journal = {Ophthalmologe},
   volume = {103},
   number = {10},
   pages = {856-860},
   note = {0941-293X (Print)
Journal article},
   abstract = {Selective Retina Therapy (SRT) is a new laser treatment that selectively targets the retinal pigmen epithelium (RPE). In this study, we treated 39 patients presenting with nonischemic, focal and focal-diffuse diabetic maculopathy with SRT. In the main. the results indicate that SRT had stabilizing effects on visual acuity, angiographic leakage, lipid exudation, and foveal retinal thickness. SRT is safe and is especially useful for treating pathologies that are located close to the fovea, which cannot be treated with conventional argon laser photocoagulation.},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=16937095},
   year = {2006},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
J. Roider,
Selektive Retina Therapie – SRT, Der Ophthalmologe , vol. 103, no. 10, pp. 837-838, 2006.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Roider,
   author = {Roider, J.},
   title = {Selektive Retina Therapie – SRT},
   journal = {Der Ophthalmologe},
   volume = {103},
   number = {10},
   pages = {837-838},
   year = {2006}
}
C. Klatt, H. Elsner, E. Porksen, A. Bunse, and J. Roider,
Selective retina therapy in central serous chorioretinopathy with detachment of the pigmentary epithelium, Ophthalmologe , vol. 103, no. 10, pp. 850-5, 2006.
File: query.fcgi
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Klatt2006,
   author = {Klatt, C. and Elsner, H. and Porksen, E. and Brinkmann, R. and Bunse, A. and Birngruber, R. and Roider, J.},
   title = {Selective retina therapy in central serous chorioretinopathy with detachment of the pigmentary epithelium},
   journal = {Ophthalmologe},
   volume = {103},
   number = {10},
   pages = {850-5},
   note = {0941-293X (Print)
Case Reports
English Abstract
Journal Article},
   abstract = {BACKGROUND: Selective Retina Therapy (SRT) is a new and innovative laser treatment modality that selectively treats the retinal pigmentary epithelium while sparing the photoreceptors. This therapeutic concept appears to be particularly suitable for treating patients with acute or chronic central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC). We present preliminary results obtained in five patients who had CSC associated with pigmentary epithelium detachment (PED) and serous subretinal fluid (SRF) and who were treated with SRT. METHODS: This case series was made up of five male patients (mean age 47 years) with chronic CSC and SRF resulting from PED. Examinations performed before and at 1 month and 3 months after the treatment were: BCVA, FLA, OCT (Zeiss OCT III). For SRT, confluent treatment of the PED (area of leakage) was carried out using a pulsed frequency-doubled, Q-switched Nd-YLF prototype laser (lambda=527 nm, t= 1.7 s, 100 Hz, energy = 150-250 J). RESULTS: Best corrected visual acuity at baseline was 0.53, while after 4 weeks it was 0.56 and after 12 weeks, 0.5. At baseline leakage was seen at the PED on fluorescein angiography in all patients. After 4 weeks leakage activity was no longer noted on angiography in 4 of 5 patients. OCT at baseline showed SRF at the edge of the PED in all patients, but in 4 of the 5 patients this was no longer detectable after 4 weeks. CONCLUSION: SRT is a safe and effective treatment for patients with CSC in which PED has caused SRF. Not a single case of rip syndrome was observed in this study, even though the PED was treated confluently. Since SRT spares the photoreceptors it is particularly suitable for the treatment of CSC, especially when the origin of leakage is located close to the fovea. The results indicate that SRT leads to reconstruction of the outer blood-retina barrier.},
   keywords = {Adult
Chorioretinitis/complications/*surgery
Humans
Laser Surgery/*methods
Lasers/*therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures/*methods
Preoperative Care/methods
Retinal Detachment/etiology/*surgery
Treatment Outcome},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=16937094},
   year = {2006},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
H Elsner, E Pörksen, C Klatt, A Bunse, H Laqua, and J Roider,
Selective Retina Therapy (SRT) in patients with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC), Graefes Arch Ophthalmol, in print. , vol. on-line: DOI 10.1007/s00417-006-0368-5, 2006.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Elsner2006,
   author = {Elsner, H and Pörksen, E and Klatt, C and Bunse, A and Theisen-Kunde, D and Brinkmann, R and Birngruber, R and Laqua, H and Roider, J},
   title = {Selective Retina Therapy (SRT) in patients with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC)},
   journal = {Graefes Arch Ophthalmol, in print.},
   volume = {on-line: DOI 10.1007/s00417-006-0368-5},
   year = {2006},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
R Tanaka, Y Hayashi, T Kohno, K Yamazaki, and K Shiraki,
Retinal phlebitis in a case of erythema induratum of Bazin, Japanese Journal of Clinical Ophthalmology , vol. 60, no. 12, pp. 1901-1904, 2006.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Hayashi,
   author = {Tanaka, R and Hayashi, Y and Kohno, T and Yamazaki, K and Shiraki, K},
   title = {Retinal phlebitis in a case of erythema induratum of Bazin},
   journal = {Japanese Journal of Clinical Ophthalmology},
   volume = {60},
   number = {12},
   pages = {1901-1904},
   abstract = {Purpose?To report a case of erythema of Bazin associated with retinal phlebitis. Case and Findings?A 59-year-old woman developed painful exanthema in both legs,followed by blurring and seeing flies in her left eye one month later. She was strongly positive to tuberculin test. Biopsy of erythema showed epithelioid granuloma with Langhans giant cells,leading to the diagnosis of Bazin disease. When seen 6 weeks after onset of blurring,her corrected visual acuity was 1.2 right and 1.0 left. Her left eye showed signs of retinal phlebitis. Peroral corticosteroid failed to improve skin and fundus lesions. Similar retinal phlebitis developed in the right eye 2 months later. Pulsed corticosteroid followed by tapering was followed by gradual improvement of skin and eye manifestations. Conclusion?Pulsed corticosteroid therapy may be effective for skin and eye manifestations of erythema of Bazin.},
   year = {2006}
}
C. Ahlers, S. Michels, A. Beckendorf, and U. Schmidt-Erfurth,
Three-dimensional imaging of pigment epithelial detachment in age-related macular degeneration using optical coherence tomography, retinal thickness analysis and topographic angiography, Graefes Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology , vol. 244, no. 10, pp. 1233-1239, 2006.
DOI:DOI 10.1007/s00417-006-0418-z
File: WOS:000240729400003
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Ahlers2006,

   author = {Ahlers, C. and Michels, S. and Beckendorf, A. and Birngruber, R. and Schmidt-Erfurth, U.},
   title = {Three-dimensional imaging of pigment epithelial detachment in age-related macular degeneration using optical coherence tomography, retinal thickness analysis and topographic angiography},
   journal = {Graefes Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology},
   volume = {244},
   number = {10},
   pages = {1233-1239},
   note = {087FX
Times Cited:16
Cited References Count:19},
   abstract = {Introduction: New diagnostic tools such as the retinal thickness analyzer (RTA), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and topographic angiography (TAG) were introduced into clinical ophthalmology during the last years giving the examiner new insights into anatomical and functional aspects of macular disease. In this study, advantages and disadvantages of the new imaging methods have been evaluated in patients with serous (sPED) and fibrovascular pigment epithelial detachments (fPED) secondary to age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods: TAG, using fluorescein angiography (FA), provides a three-dimensional profile of the fluorescein pattern based on the analysis of a set of 32 confocal images over a depth of 4 mm. RTA and OCT provide cross-sectional images of the neurosensory retina and the retinal pigment epithelium-choriocapillary complex as well as retinal thickness data encoded in a false color map. We compared and evaluated these modalities in 15 patients with fPED and 15 patients with sPED secondary to AMD. Results: In patients with classic fPED, TAG detected neovascular structures and delineated their configuration. In sPEDs, pooling of extravascular fluid was detected in a dome-shaped configuration. OCT provided detailed information on the neurosensory retina's structures but failed to detect the neovascular membrane in fPED. Mapping the retinal thickness, RTA and OCT both failed to detect the PED and showed typical algorithm error-based patterns. Conclusions: TAG OCT and RTA are useful imaging modalities in the evaluation of AMD cases. TAG visualizes the vascular configuration, dynamic perfusion, and leakage changes. OCT and RTA are able to complementarily document intra-, subretinal, and sub-RPE fluid accumulation secondary to CNV. However, OCT seems to be more efficient in imaging AMD-related pathologies than RTA, as this modality is often compromised by intra- or subretinal structural abnormalities. Nevertheless, all modalities may provide further valuable insight into AMD pathogenesis, enhance diagnostic quality, and improve the assessment of therapeutic effects.},
   keywords = {choroidal neovascularization
pigment epithelial detachment (ped)
topographic angiography
retinal thickness analyzer
age-related macular degeneration (amd)
optical coherence tomography
imaging
choroidal neovascularization
verteporfin therapy
disease
repeatability
eyes
oct
tap},
   ISSN = {0721-832X},
   DOI = {DOI 10.1007/s00417-006-0418-z},
   url = {<Go to ISI>://WOS:000240729400003},
   year = {2006},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
H. Diddens, N. Arp, and W. Eisenbeiß,
Photodynamische Therapie zur Behandlung lokaler Wunden, GMS Krankenhaushyg Interdiszip , vol. 1, no. 1, pp. Doc 19, 2006.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Diddens,
   author = {Diddens, H. and Arp, N. and Eisenbeiß, W.},
   title = {Photodynamische Therapie zur Behandlung lokaler Wunden},
   journal = {GMS Krankenhaushyg Interdiszip},
   volume = {1},
   number = {1},
   pages = {Doc 19},
   year = {2006}
}
H. Hoerauf, A. Brix, J. Winkler, G. Droege, H. Laqua, and A. Vogel,
Photoablation of inner limiting membrane and inner retinal layers using the erbium : YAG-laser: An in vitro study, Lasers in Surgery and Medicine , vol. 38, no. 1, pp. 52-61, 2006.
DOI:Doi 10.1002/Lsm.20269
File: WOS:000235149600007
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Hoerauf2006,
   author = {Hoerauf, H. and Brix, A. and Winkler, J. and Droege, G. and Winter, C. and Birngruber, R. and Laqua, H. and Vogel, A.},
   title = {Photoablation of inner limiting membrane and inner retinal layers using the erbium : YAG-laser: An in vitro study},
   journal = {Lasers in Surgery and Medicine},
   volume = {38},
   number = {1},
   pages = {52-61},
   note = {009YN
Times Cited:4
Cited References Count:51},
   abstract = {Background and Objectives: To explore the potential of Er:YAG-laser irradiation for precise and tractionless retinal tissue and inner limiting membrane ablation.
Materials and Methods: We used free-running Er:YAG-laser irradiation (lambda = 2.94 mu m) transmitted either through a 10 em long low-OH-quartz fiber or a 2 m long sapphire fiber that produced a more homogenous light distribution at the fiber tip. Retinal ablation in porcine retinal explants was performed under air or perfluorodecaline (PFD). Ablation depth was evaluated by optical coherence tomography (OCT) and from histologic sections.
Results: A radiant exposure of 5.0 J/cm(2) delivered through a low-OH-quartz fiber and PFD caused a complete transsection of the neurosensory retina. Radiant exposures between 3.5 and 2.0 J/cm(2) resulted in marked variations of ablation depth and adjacent thermal damage. By contrast, laser pulses of 4.0 and 3.0 J/cm(2) transmitted through the sapphire fiber produced more homogenous defect patterns and less thermal damage. Close to the ablation threshold, with 1.0-2.0 J/cm(2), ablation was limited to a 10-20 mu m thin layer of the neural retina.
Conclusions: We achieved in vitro ablation of inner retinal layers, but could not produce selective and reproducible ILM removal.},
   keywords = {macular surgery
optical coherence tomography
perfluorocarbon liquid
retina
retinal explant
optical coherence tomography
macular hole surgery
experimental vitreous membranes
er-yag
vitreoretinal surgery
clinical-experience
indocyanine green
excimer-laser
pig eyes
ablation},
   ISSN = {0196-8092},
   DOI = {Doi 10.1002/Lsm.20269},
   url = {<Go to ISI>://WOS:000235149600007},
   year = {2006},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
J. Kandulla, and H. Elsner,
Noninvasive optoacoustic online retinal temperature determination during continuous-wave laser irradiation, Journal of Biomedical Optics , vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 041111, 2006.
DOI:Artn 041111 Doi 10.1117/1.2236301
File: WOS:000241162000016
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Kandulla2006,
   author = {Kandulla, J. and Elsner, H. and Birngruber, R. and Brinkmann, R.},
   title = {Noninvasive optoacoustic online retinal temperature determination during continuous-wave laser irradiation},
   journal = {Journal of Biomedical Optics},
   volume = {11},
   number = {4},
   note = {093IM
Times Cited:30
Cited References Count:40},
   abstract = {The therapeutic effect of most retinal laser treatments is initiated by a transient temperature increase. Although crucial to the effectiveness of the treatment, the temperature course is not exactly known due to individually different tissue properties. We develop an optoacoustic method to determine the retinal temperature increase in real time during continuous-wave (cw) laser irradiation, and perform temperature calculations to interpret the results exemplary for transpupillary thermotherapy (TTT). Porcine globes ex vivo and rabbit eyes in vivo are irradiated with a diode laser (lambda=810 nm, P <= 3 W, phi = 2 mm) for 60 s. Simultaneously, pulses from a N-2-laser pumped dye laser (lambda= 500 nm, tau= 3.5 ns, E approximate to 5 mu J) are applied on the retina. Following its absorption, an ultrasonic pressure wave is emitted, which is detected by a transducer embedded in a contact lens. Using the previously measured temperature-dependent Gruneisen coefficient of chorioretinal tissue, a temperature raise in porcine eyes of 5.8 degrees C/ (W/cm(2)) after 60 s is observed and confirmed by simultaneous measurements with an inserted thermocouple. In a rabbit, we find 1.4 degrees C/(W/cm(2)) with, and 2.2 degrees C/(W/cm(2)) without perfusion at the same location. Coagulation of the rabbit's retina occurs at Delta T = 21 degrees C after 40 s. In conclusion, this optoacoustic method seems feasible for an in vivo real-time determination of temperature, opening the possibility for feedback control retinal laser treatments. (c) 2006 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.},
   keywords = {temperature
optoacoustics
transpupillary thermotherapy
ultrasonic transducer
laser
heat diffusion calculations
retinal laser treatment
subfoveal choroidal neovascularization
transpupillary thermotherapy
macular degeneration
ocular media
blood flow
eye
fundus
light
photocoagulation
transmission},
   ISSN = {1083-3668},
   DOI = {Artn 041111
Doi 10.1117/1.2236301},
   url = {<Go to ISI>://WOS:000241162000016},
   year = {2006},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
M Yamamoto, T Kohno, M Murasawa, H Ono, S Ueda, Y Hayashi, S Ataka, and K Shiraki,
Lipofuscin autofluorescence in a case of crystalline retinopathy., Japanese Journal of Clinical Ophthalmology , vol. 60, no. 6, pp. 1039-1043, 2006.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Hayashi,
   author = {Yamamoto, M and Kohno, T and Murasawa, M and Ono, H and Ueda, S and Hayashi, Y and Ataka, S and Shiraki, K},
   title = {Lipofuscin autofluorescence in a case of crystalline retinopathy.},
   journal = {Japanese Journal of Clinical Ophthalmology},
   volume = {60},
   number = {6},
   pages = {1039-1043},
   year = {2006}
}
M. Müller, H. Hoerauf, G. Geerling, S. Pape, and H. Laqua,
Filtring Bleb Evaluation with Slit-Lamp-Adapted 1310-nm Optical Coherence Tomography, Curr Eye Res , vol. 31, no. 11, pp. 909-915, 2006.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Müller2006,
   author = {Muller, M. and Hoerauf, H. and Geerling, G. and Pape, S. and Winter, C. and Hüttmann, G. and Birngruber, R. and Laqua, H.},
   title = {Filtring Bleb Evaluation with Slit-Lamp-Adapted 1310-nm Optical Coherence Tomography},
   journal = {Curr Eye Res},
   volume = {31},
   number = {11},
   pages = {909-915},
   year = {2006},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
M. Müller, H. Hoerauf, G. Geerling, S. Pape, and H. Laqua,
Filtering bleb evaluation with slit-lamp-adapted 1310-nm optical coherence tomography, Current Eye Research , vol. 31, no. 11, pp. 909-915, 2006.
DOI:Doi 10.1080/02713680600910528
File: WOS:000242142000003
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Müller2006,
   author = {Muller, M. and Hoerauf, H. and Geerling, G. and Pape, S. and Winter, C. and Huttmann, G. and Birngruber, R. and Laqua, H.},
   title = {Filtering bleb evaluation with slit-lamp-adapted 1310-nm optical coherence tomography},
   journal = {Current Eye Research},
   volume = {31},
   number = {11},
   pages = {909-915},
   note = {107AB
Times Cited:24
Cited References Count:27},
   abstract = {Purpose: Investigation of slit-lamp-adapted 1310-nm optical coherence tomography (OCT) as an in vivo imaging device in the postoperative course of glaucoma surgery. Methods: Postoperative images of filtering blebs and deep sclerectomies and their healing processes were qualitatively evaluated with a slit-lamp-adapted anterior segment OCT (AS-OCT; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) in 28 patients. Ophthalmologic examinations included slit-lamp examination, applanation tonometry, and slit-lamp photography. The OCT scans were qualitatively correlated with the morphologic and functional outcome of the filtering bleb. Results: 1310-nm OCT was able to demonstrate the internal structure and the dimensions of filtering blebs, as well as the scleral flap and the deep sclerectomy location including Descemet membrane. Functioning filtering blebs showed a low OCT signal, small fluid-filled cysts, superficial microcystic layer, and a slack internal texture. High internal reflectivity indicated an earlier scarring of the filtering bleb. Nonfunctioning filtering blebs delivered a high OCT signal, no or few cysts, and a dense internal texture. These different OCT patterns correlated with the clinical outcome. Conclusions: Slit-lamp-adapted 1310-nm OCT allowed the noncontact observation and documentation of the postoperative healing course of filtering blebs after glaucoma surgery. Internal structures of the filtering bleb and deep sclerectomies could be visualized. Functioning and dysfunctioning filtering blebs delivered different OCT pattern and correlated with the clinical outcome. This could be a new way to assess the postoperative healing process with the possibility of earlier intervention in cases of impending scarring.},
   keywords = {deep sclerectomy
filtering bleb
oct
scarring
anterior segment
mitomycin-c
follow-up
trabeculectomy
surgery
cornea
eye},
   ISSN = {0271-3683},
   DOI = {Doi 10.1080/02713680600910528},
   url = {<Go to ISI>://WOS:000242142000003},
   year = {2006},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
A. Vogel,
Stress wave emission and cavitation bubble dynamics by nanosecond optical breakdown in a tissue phantom., J Fluid Mech , vol. 558, pp. 281-308, 2006.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Brujan,
   author = {Brujan, EA. and Vogel, A .},
   title = {Stress wave emission and cavitation bubble dynamics by nanosecond optical breakdown in a tissue phantom.},
   journal = { J Fluid Mech},
   volume = {558},
   pages = {281-308},
   year = {2006}
}

2005

R. Huber, M. Wojtkowski, J. Fujimoto, J. Jiang, and A. Cable,
Three-dimensional and C-mode OCT imaging with a compact, frequency swept laser source at 1300 nm, Opt. Express , vol. 13, no. 26, pp. 10523-10538, Dec. 2005. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OPEX.13.010523
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Huber:05,
author = {R. Huber and M. Wojtkowski and J. G. Fujimoto and J. Y. Jiang and A. E. Cable},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Optical coherence tomography; Lasers, tunable; High speed imaging; Image fusion; Laser sources; Semiconductor lasers; Swept lasers; Three dimensional imaging},
number = {26},
pages = {10523--10538},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Three-dimensional and C-mode OCT imaging with a compact, frequency swept laser source at 1300 nm},
volume = {13},
month = {Dec},
year = {2005},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-13-26-10523},
doi = {10.1364/OPEX.13.010523},
abstract = {We demonstrate high resolution, three-dimensional OCT imaging with a high speed, frequency swept 1300 nm laser source. A new external cavity semiconductor laser design, optimized for application to swept source OCT, is discussed. The design of the laser enables adjustment of an internal spectral filter to change the filter bandwidth and provides a robust bulk optics design. The laser generates ~30 mW instantaneous peak power at an effective 16 kHz sweep rate with a tuning range of ~133 nm full width. In frequency domain reflectometry and OCT applications, 109 dB sensitivity and ~10 $\mu$m axial resolution in tissue can be achieved with the swept laser. The high imaging speeds enable three-dimensional OCT imaging, including zone focusing or C-mode imaging and image fusion to acquire large depth of field data sets with high resolution. In addition, three-dimensional OCT data provides coherence gated en face images similar to optical coherence microscopy (OCM) and also enables the generation of images similar to confocal microscopy by summing signals in the axial direction. High speed, three-dimensional OCT imaging can provide comprehensive data which combines the advantages of optical coherence tomography and microscopy in a single system.},
}
R. Huber, K. Taira, M. Wojtkowski, and J. Fujimoto,
Fourier domain mode locked lasers for OCT imaging at up to 290 kHz sweep rates, in Optical Coherence Tomography and Coherence Techniques II , Wolfgang Drexler, Eds. SPIE, Oct.2005. pp. 58611B.
DOI:10.1117/12.641732
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{10.1117/12.641732,
author = {R. Huber and K. Taira and M. Wojtkowski and J. G. Fujimoto},
title = {{Fourier domain mode locked lasers for OCT imaging at up to 290 kHz sweep rates}},
volume = {5861},
booktitle = {Optical Coherence Tomography and Coherence Techniques II},
editor = {Wolfgang Drexler},
organization = {International Society for Optics and Photonics},
publisher = {SPIE},
pages = {58611B},
abstract = {A high speed, tunable laser using Fourier Domain Mode Locking is demonstrated for OCT imaging.  Record sweep speeds up to 290 kHz, 3 cm coherence length and 145 nm range at 1300 nm are achieved.},
keywords = {Fourier domain mode locking, swept source, swept laser, tunable laser, wavelength agile laser, optical coherence tomography, spectral OCT, Fourier domain},
year = {2005},
doi = {10.1117/12.641732},
URL = {https://doi.org/10.1117/12.641732}
}
R. Huber, K. Taira, and J. Fujimoto,
Fourier Domain Mode Locking: Overcoming limitations of frequency swept light sources and pulsed lasers, in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe/ European Quantum Electronics Conference (CLEO/Europe - EQEC 2005) , 052005. pp. CP3-5-THU.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@InProceedings{HU_2005_Huber_a,
  Title                    = {{Fourier Domain Mode Locking: Overcoming limitations of frequency swept light sources and pulsed lasers}},
  Author                   = {Huber, Robert A and Taira, Kenji and Fujimoto, James G},
  Booktitle                = {Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe/ European Quantum Electronics Conference (CLEO/Europe - EQEC 2005)},
keywords = {AG-Huber_FDML, AG-Huber_OCT},
  Year                     = { 2005}
}
R. Huber, K. Taira, T. Ko, M. Wojtkowski, V. Srinivasan, J. Fujimoto, and K. Hsu,
High-Speed, Amplified, Frequency Swept Laser at 20 kHz Sweep Rates for OCT Imaging - Technical Digest (CD), in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies , Optica Publishing Group, 052005. pp. JThE33.
DOI:10.1109/QELS.2005.1549239
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Huber:05,
author = {R. Huber and K. Taira and T. H. Ko and M. Wojtkowski and V. Srinivasan and J. G. Fujimoto and K. Hsu},
booktitle = {Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies},
journal = {Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies},
keywords = {Imaging systems; Optical coherence tomography; Lasers and laser optics; Lasers, tunable; Laser amplifiers; Laser sources; Light sources; Optical coherence tomography; Point spread function; Ring lasers},
pages = {JThE33},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {High-speed, amplified, frequency swept laser at 20 kHz sweep rates for OCT imaging},
year = {2005},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/abstract.cfm?URI=QELS-2005-JThE33},
abstract = {We demonstrate a high-speed, frequency swept, 1300 nm laser for Fourier domain OCT. The laser generates ~45 mW instantaneous power with 20 kHz sweep rates and achieves 108 dB sensitivity and 12.7 um resolution.},
}
V. Sharma, A. Kowalczyk, R. Huber, J. Fujimoto, and K. Minoshima,
Three Dimensional Waveguide Splitters Fabricated in Glass Using a Femtosecond Laser Oscillator - Technical Digest (CD), in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies , Optica Publishing Group, 052005. pp. CThCC4.
DOI:10.1109/CLEO.2005.202363
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Sharma:05,
author = {V. Sharma and A. M. Kowalevicz and R. Huber and J. G. Fujimoto and K. Minoshima},
booktitle = {Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies},
journal = {Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies},
keywords = {Optical design and fabrication; Microstructure fabrication; Ultrafast optics; Ultrafast processes in condensed matter, including semiconductors; Femtosecond lasers; Femtosecond pulses; Free electron lasers; High numerical aperture optics; Three dimensional fabrication; Ti:sapphire lasers},
pages = {CThCC4},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Three dimensional waveguide splitters fabricated in glass using a femtosecond laser oscillator},
year = {2005},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/abstract.cfm?URI=CLEO-2005-CThCC4},
abstract = {Three-dimensional optical waveguide devices are fabricated in glass using femtosecond pulses from an extended cavity Ti:sapphire laser oscillator. We demonstrate increased device densities by fabricating highly symmetric 1:N waveguide splitters in three dimensions.},
}
R. Huber, M. Wojtkowski, K. Taira, J. Fujimoto, and K. Hsu,
Amplified, frequency swept lasers for frequency domain reflectometry and OCT imaging: design and scaling principles, Opt. Express , vol. 13, no. 9, pp. 3513-3528, 05 2005. Optica Publishing Group.
DOI:10.1364/OPEX.13.003513
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Huber:05,
author = {R. Huber and M. Wojtkowski and K. Taira and J. G. Fujimoto and K. Hsu},
journal = {Opt. Express},
keywords = {Optical coherence tomography; Lasers, tunable; Fiber lasers; Fiber optic amplifiers; Fiber optic components; Laser sources; Light sources; Tunable diode lasers},
number = {9},
pages = {3513--3528},
publisher = {Optica Publishing Group},
title = {Amplified, frequency swept lasers for frequency domain reflectometry and OCT imaging: design and scaling principles},
volume = {13},
month = {May},
year = {2005},
url = {https://opg.optica.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-13-9-3513},
doi = {10.1364/OPEX.13.003513},
abstract = {We demonstrate a high-speed, frequency swept, 1300 nm laser source for frequency domain reflectometry and OCT with Fourier domain/swept-source detection. The laser uses a fiber coupled, semiconductor amplifier and a tunable fiber Fabry-Perot filter. We present scaling principles which predict the maximum frequency sweep speed and trade offs in output power, noise and instantaneous linewidth performance. The use of an amplification stage for increasing output power and for spectral shaping is discussed in detail. The laser generates ~45 mW instantaneous peak power at 20 kHz sweep rates with a tuning range of ~120 nm full width. In frequency domain reflectometry and OCT applications the frequency swept laser achieves 108 dB sensitivity and ~10 {\textmu}m axial resolution in tissue. We also present a fast algorithm for real time calibration of the fringe signal to equally spaced sampling in frequency for high speed OCT image preview.},
}
R. Huber, K. Taira, M. Wojtkowski, T. Ko, J. Fujimoto, and K. Hsu,
Figh-speed frequency swept light source for Fourier domain OCT at 20 kHz A-scan rate, in Coherence Domain Optical Methods and Optical Coherence Tomography in Biomedicine IX , Valery V. Tuchin and Joseph A. Izatt and James G. Fujimoto, Eds. SPIE, 042005. pp. 96-100.
DOI:10.1117/12.592552
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{10.1117/12.592552,
author = {Robert Huber and Kenji Taira and Maciej Wojtkowski and Tony Hong-Tyng Ko and James G. Fujimoto and Kevin Hsu},
title = {{High-speed-frequency swept light source for Fourier domain OCT at 20-kHz A-scan rate}},
volume = {5690},
booktitle = {Coherence Domain Optical Methods and Optical Coherence Tomography in Biomedicine IX},
editor = {Valery V. Tuchin and Joseph A. Izatt and James G. Fujimoto},
organization = {International Society for Optics and Photonics},
publisher = {SPIE},
pages = {96 -- 100},
abstract = {We demonstrate a high-speed tunable, continuous wave laser source for Fourier domain OCT.  The laser source is based on a fiber coupled, semiconductor optical amplifier and a tunable ultrahigh finesse, fiber Fabry Perot filter for frequency tuning.  The light source provides frequency scan rates of up to 20,000 sweeps per second over a wavelength range of >70 nm FWHM at 1330 nm, yielding an axial resolution of ~14 &#956;m in air.  The linewidth is narrow and corresponds to a coherence length of several mm, enabling OCT imaging over a large axial range.},
keywords = {swept source, Fourier Domain, OCT, tunable laser, Spectral Domain, frequency domain imaging, OFDI, sweep},
year = {2005},
doi = {10.1117/12.592552},
URL = {https://doi.org/10.1117/12.592552}
}
R. Huber, T. Köhler, M. Lenz, E. Bamberg, R. Kalmbach, M. Engelhard, and J. Wachtveitl,
pH-dependent photoisomerization of retinal in proteorhodopsin., Biochemistry , vol. 44, no. 6, pp. 1800-1806, 01 2005.
DOI:10.1021/bi048318h
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{doi:10.1021/bi048318h,
author = {Huber, Robert and Köhler, Thomas and Lenz, Martin O. and Bamberg, Ernst and Kalmbach, Rolf and Engelhard, Martin and Wachtveitl, Josef},
title = {pH-Dependent Photoisomerization of Retinal in Proteorhodopsin},
journal = {Biochemistry},
volume = {44},
number = {6},
pages = {1800-1806},
year = {2005},
doi = {10.1021/bi048318h},
note ={PMID: 15697205},
URL = {https://doi.org/10.1021/bi048318h},
eprint = {https://doi.org/10.1021/bi048318h},
abstract = {The early steps in the photocycle of the bacterial proton pump proteorhodopsin (PR) were analyzed by ultrafast pump/probe spectroscopy to compare the rate of retinal isomerization at alkaline and acidic pH values. At pH 9, the functionally important primary proton acceptor (Asp97, pKa = 7.7) is negatively charged; consequently, a reaction cycle analogous to the archaeal bacteriorhodopsin (BR) is observed. The excited electronic state of PR displays a pronounced biphasic decay with time constants of 400 fs and 8 ps. At pH 6 where Asp97 is protonated a similar biphasic decay is observed, although it is significantly slower (700 fs and 15 ps). The results indicate, in agreement to similar findings in other retinal proteins, that also in PR the charge distribution within the chromophore binding pocket is a major determinant for the rate and the efficiency of the primary reaction. }
}
C Framme, J Roider, H. Sachs, and V. Gabel,
Noninvasive Imaging and Monitoring of Retinal Pigment Epithelium Patterns Using Fundus Autofluorescence - Review, Curr Med Imag Rev , vol. 1, pp. 89-103, 2005.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Framme,
   author = {Framme, C and Roider, J and Sachs, H G and Brinkmann, R and Gabel, V-P},
   title = {Noninvasive Imaging and Monitoring of Retinal Pigment Epithelium Patterns Using Fundus Autofluorescence - Review},
   journal = {Curr Med Imag Rev},
   volume = {1},
   pages = {89-103},
   year = {2005}
}
J Kandulla, H Elsner, M Hilmes, and C Hartert,
Optoacoustic temperature determination at the fundus of the eye during Transpupillary Thermotherapy, in Proc SPIE , 2005. pp. 208-214.
File: 12.608406
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Kandulla2005,
   author = {Kandulla, J and Elsner, H and Hilmes, M and Hartert, C and Brinkmann, R},
   title = {Optoacoustic temperature determination at the fundus of the eye during Transpupillary Thermotherapy},
   booktitle = {Proc SPIE},
   volume = {5688},
   pages = {208-214},
   keywords = {AutoPhoN},
   type = {Conference Proceedings},
url = { https://doi.org/10.1117/12.608406},
year = { 2005}
}
C Brinkmann,
Non-invasive real-time retinal temperature determination during TTT, Invest Ophthal & VisScie , 2005.
File: WOS:000227980401431
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Brinkmann2005,
   author = {Brinkmann, R; Kandulla, J; Elsner, H; Hilmes, M; Hartert, C and Birngruber, R},
   title = {Non-invasive real-time retinal temperature determination during TTT},
   journal = {Invest Ophthal & VisScie},
   
   note = {Suppl. S
911CZ
1406
Times Cited:0
Cited References Count:0},
   ISSN = {0146-0404},
   url = {<Go to ISI>://WOS:000227980401431},
   year = { 2005},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
V. Horneffer, A. Vogel, B. Sägmüller, and K. Schütze,
Microdissection, catapulting, and microinjection of biologic specimens with femtosecond laser pulses, in SPIE/OSA Conference on Biomedical Optics ECBO,12.-16.06.2005 , 2005.
File: abstract.cfm
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Horneffer,
   author = {Horneffer, V. and Vogel, A. and Sägmüller, B. and Schütze, K.},
   title = {Microdissection, catapulting, and microinjection of biologic specimens with femtosecond laser pulses},
   booktitle = {SPIE/OSA Conference on Biomedical Optics ECBO,12.-16.06.2005},

}
D. Daniltchenko, M. Sachs, E. Lankenau, F. König, M. Burckhardt, G. Kristiansen, D. Schnorr, S. Al-Shukri, and S. Löning,
Ex vivo and in vivo topographics studies of bladder by optical coherence tomography, in Saratov Fall Meeting 2004: Optical Technologies in Biophysics and Medicine VI , Tuchin, V., Eds. Proceedings 2005, 2005. pp. 209-14.
File: 12.634810.short
Bibtex: BibTeX
@inproceedings{Daniltchenko,
   author = {Daniltchenko, D. and Sachs, M. and Lankenau, E. and König, F. and Burckhardt, M. and Hüttmann, G. and Kristiansen, G. and Schnorr, D. and Al-Shukri, S. and Löning, S.},
   title = {Ex vivo and in vivo topographics studies of bladder by optical coherence tomography},
   booktitle = {Saratov Fall Meeting 2004: Optical Technologies in Biophysics and Medicine VI},
   editor = {Tuchin, V.},
   publisher = {Proceedings 2005},
   volume = {5771},
   pages = {209-14},
year = { 2005},
URL = {https://www.spiedigitallibrary.org/conference-proceedings-of-spie/5771/0000/Ex-vivo-and-in-vivo-topographic-studies-of-bladder-by/10.1117/12.634810.short}

}
I. Apitz, and A. Vogel,
Material ejection in nanosecond Er:YAG laser ablation of water, liver, and skin, Applied Physics A: Materials Science & Processing , vol. 81, no. 2, pp. 329-338, 2005.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Apitz,
   author = {Apitz, I. and Vogel, A.},
   title = {Material ejection in nanosecond Er:YAG laser ablation of water, liver, and skin},
   journal = {Applied Physics A: Materials Science & Processing},
   volume = {81},
   number = {2},
   pages = {329-338},
   abstract = {We investigated the mechanisms of material ejection in Q-switched Er:YAG laser tissue ablation (70-ns pulse duration) where moderate and large radiant exposures are associated with large volumetric energy densities in the target material. For water, an initial phase of non-equilibrium surface vaporization is followed by an explosive vaporization of the superficial liquid volume from a supercritical state. The ablation of deeper layers with lower peak temperatures proceeds as phase explosion. For mechanically strong tissues, non-equilibrium surface vaporization is followed by a vapour explosion coupled with thermal dissociation of the biomolecules into volatile products. In deeper layers, ablation proceeds as confined boiling with mechanical tearing of the tissue matrix by the vapour pressure. The recoil stress induced at a radiant exposure of 5.4 J/cm 2 is in the order of 500–900 MPa. For water and soft tissues such as liver, the recoil causes a powerful secondary material expulsion. For stronger tissues such as skin, no secondary expulsion was observed even though the recoil stress largely exceeds the static tensile strength of the tissue. Recoil-induced material expulsion results in an increase of both ablation efficiency and mechanical side effects of ablation. Theoretical modelling of the succession of phase transitions in nanosecond-laser tissue ablation and of recoil-induced material expulsion remain a major challenge for future work.},
   keywords = {Physik und Astronomie},
   year = {2005}
}
A Hamaguchi, Y Hayashi, T Motoyama, H Imamura, K Imamoto, T Kohno, and K Shiraki,
A case of bilateral endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis, Folia ophthalmologica Japonica , vol. 56, no. 10, pp. 826-830, 2005.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Hamaguchi,
   author = {Hamaguchi, A and Hayashi, Y and Motoyama, T and Imamura, H and Imamoto, K and Kohno, T and Shiraki, K},
   title = {A case of bilateral endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis},
   journal = {Folia ophthalmologica Japonica},
   volume = {56},
   number = {10},
   pages = {826-830},
   year = {2005}
}
M Yamaguchi, T Yokoyama, S Tamaoki, Y Hayashi, H Tabuchi, and K Shiraki,
Lateral rectus posterior-fixation suture for large-angle exotropia, Japanese Review of Clinical Ophthalmology , vol. 99, no. 4, pp. 307-311, 2005.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Hayashi,
   author = {Yamaguchi, M and Yokoyama, T and Tamaoki, S and Hayashi, Y and Tabuchi, H and Shiraki, K},
   title = {Lateral rectus posterior-fixation suture for large-angle exotropia},
   journal = {Japanese Review of Clinical Ophthalmology},
   volume = {99},
   number = {4},
   pages = {307-311},
   year = {2005}
}
G. Geerling, M. Müller, H. Hoerauf, S. Oelckers, and H. Laqua,
Intraoperative 2-dimensional optical coherence tomography as a new tool for anterior segment surgery, Arch Ophthalmol , vol. 123, no. 2, pp. 253-7, 2005.
File: query.fcgi
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Geerling2005,
   author = {Geerling, G. and Muller, M. and Winter, C. and Hoerauf, H. and Oelckers, S. and Laqua, H. and Birngruber, R.},
   title = {Intraoperative 2-dimensional optical coherence tomography as a new tool for anterior segment surgery},
   journal = {Arch Ophthalmol},
   volume = {123},
   number = {2},
   pages = {253-7},
   note = {0003-9950 (Print)
Journal Article},
   abstract = {We tested a 1310-nm optical coherence tomograph coupled with a beam splitter on the front lens of an operating microscope for intraoperative, noncontact visualization of anterior segment procedures. This new modification of optical coherence tomography technology allows intraoperative, high-resolution, cross-sectional imaging and pachymetry of the cornea and sclera during anterior segment surgery. It is particularly helpful for lamellar dissection techniques such as deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty and trabeculectomy.},
   keywords = {Anterior Eye Segment/*surgery
Cornea/pathology
Corneal Transplantation/methods
Diagnostic Techniques, Ophthalmological/*instrumentation
Humans
Monitoring, Intraoperative/*instrumentation
*Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures
Sclera/pathology
Tomography, Optical Coherence/*instrumentation
Trabecular Meshwork/pathology
Trabeculectomy/methods},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=15710824},
   year = {2005},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
C. Yao, R. Rahmanzadeh, E. Endl, Z. Zhang, J. Gerdes, and G. Hüttmann,
Elevation of plasma membrane permeability by laser irradiation of selectively bound nanoparticles, J Biomed Opt , vol. 10, no. 6, pp. 064012, 2005.
DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2137321
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Yao,
   author = {Yao, C. and Rahmanzadeh, R. and Endl, E. and Zhang, Z. and Gerdes, J. and Huttmann, G.},
   title = {Elevation of plasma membrane permeability by laser irradiation of selectively bound nanoparticles},
   journal = {J Biomed Opt},
   volume = {10},
   number = {6},
   pages = {064012},
   note = {Yao, Cuiping
Rahmanzadeh, Ramtin
Endl, Elmar
Zhang, Zhenxi
Gerdes, Johannes
Huttmann, Gereon
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
United States
J Biomed Opt. 2005 Nov-Dec;10(6):064012.},
   abstract = {Irradiation of nanoabsorbers with pico- and nanosecond laser pulses could result in thermal effects with a spatial confinement of less than 50 nm. Therefore absorbing nanoparticles could be used to create controlled cellular effects. We describe a combination of laser irradiation with nanoparticles, which changes the plasma membrane permeability. We demonstrate that the system enables molecules to penetrate impermeable cell membranes. Laser light at 532 nm is used to irradiate conjugates of colloidal gold, which are delivered by antibodies to the plasma membrane of the Hodgkin's disease cell line L428 and/or the human large-cell anaplastic lymphoma cell line Karpas 299. After irradiation, membrane permeability is evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry using propidium iodide (PI) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) dextran. The fraction of transiently permeabilized and then resealed cells is affected by the laser parameter, the gold concentration, and the membrane protein of the different cell lines to which the nanoparticles are bound. Furthermore, a dependence on particle size is found for these interactions in the different cell lines. The results suggest that after optimization, this method could be used for gene transfection and gene therapy.},
   keywords = {Biopolymers/pharmacokinetics
Cell Line, Tumor
Cell Membrane Permeability/ physiology/ radiation effects
Drug Delivery Systems/ methods
Fluoresceins/ pharmacokinetics
Humans
Lasers
Lymphoma/ metabolism
Nanostructures},
   year = {2005}
}
D. Zimmermann, D. Bollmann, I. Rohde, D. Theisen-Kunde, and R. Brinkmann,
Compact, Q-switched Yb:YAG laser with a new longitudinal pumping concept, in CLEO/Europe. 2005 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe, 2005. , 2005. pp. 78-.
DOI:10.1109/CLEOE.2005.1567867
Bibtex: BibTeX
@INPROCEEDINGS{1567867,
  author={Zimmermann, D. and Bollmann, D. and Rohde, I. and Theisen-Kunde, D. and Brinkmann, R.},
  booktitle={CLEO/Europe. 2005 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe, 2005.}, 
  title={Compact, Q-switched Yb:YAG laser with a new longitudinal pumping concept}, 
  year={2005},
  volume={},
  number={},
  pages={78-},
  doi={10.1109/CLEOE.2005.1567867}}
A Vogel, B. Lorenz, B. Sägmüller, and K. Schütze,
Catapulting of microdissected histologic specimens with focused and defocused laser pulses, Optical Society of America , 2005.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Vogel,
   author = {Vogel, A and Lorenz, B. and Sägmüller, B. and Schütze, K.},
   title = {Catapulting of microdissected histologic specimens with focused and defocused laser pulses},
   journal = {Optical Society of America},
   year = {2005}
}
J Neumann,
Boiling nucleation on melanosomes and microbeads transiently heated by nanosecond and microsecond laser pulses., J Biomed Optics , vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 024001, 2005.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Neumann,
   author = {Neumann, J and Brinkmann, R},
   title = {Boiling nucleation on melanosomes and microbeads transiently heated by nanosecond and microsecond laser pulses.},
   journal = {J Biomed Optics},
   volume = {10},
   number = {2},
   pages = {024001},
   year = {2005}
}
A. Vogel, J. Noack, and G. Paltauf,
Mechanisms of femtosecond laser nanosurgery of biological cells and tissues, Appl. Phys B , vol. 81, pp. 1015-1047, 2005.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Vogel2005,
   author = {Vogel, A. and Noack, J. and Hüttmann, G. and Paltauf, G.},
   title = {Mechanisms of femtosecond laser nanosurgery of biological cells and tissues},
   journal = {Appl. Phys B},
   volume = {81},
   pages = {1015-1047},
   year = {2005}
}
C. Yao, and E. Endl,
New concepts in laser medicine: Towards a laser surgery with cellular precision, Medical laser application , vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 135-139, 2005.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Hüttmann2005,
   author = {Hüttmann, Gereon and Yao, Cuiping and Endl, Elmar},
   title = {New concepts in laser medicine: Towards a laser surgery with cellular precision},
   journal = {Medical laser application},
   volume = {20},
   number = {2},
   pages = {135-139},
   abstract = {New concepts and instrumentation in laser medicine are driven by the progress in optical technology as well as by advances in the understanding of the interaction of optical irradiation with tissue, especially at a macromolecular scale, and by the changing needs in health care. Complexity and costs of laser sources will decrease due to the use of semiconductor and fiber lasers, and complex or non-linear mechanisms by which the radiation effects tissues are better understood, especially when ultra-short laser pulses are used. Especially femtosecond lasers and nanotechnology have the potential to treat diseases at a cellular level. Focused femtosecond irradiation was successfully used to manipulate tissues with subcellular precision. Laser-irradiated nanoparticles can selectively destroy individual cells.},
   keywords = {Mikro- und Nanowirkungen
Selective Foto thermolyse
Faserlaser
Femtosekundenlaser
Nanopartikel
Micro- and nanoeffects
Selective photothermolysis
Fiber laser
Femtosecond laser
Nanoparticles},
   year = {2005}
}
U. Schmidt-Erfurth, S. Michels, L. Indorf, and R. Eggers,
Mechanism of photodynamic occlusion using liposomal Zn(II)-phtalocyanine, Current Eye Research , vol. 30, no. 7, pp. 601-612, 2005.
DOI:Doi 10.1080/02713680590968286
File: WOS:000231078000012
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Schmidt-Erfurth2005,
   author = {Schmidt-Erfurth, U. and Michels, S. and Indorf, L. and Eggers, R. and Birngruber, R.},
   title = {Mechanism of photodynamic occlusion using liposomal Zn(II)-phtalocyanine},
   journal = {Current Eye Research},
   volume = {30},
   number = {7},
   pages = {601-612},
   note = {953LO
Times Cited:2
Cited References Count:30},
   abstract = {Purpose: To evaluate the potential of liposomal Zinc(II)phthalocyanine (ZnPc) to selectively target subretinal vasculature. Methods: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with liposomal Zinc(II)-phtalocyanine was used to induce choroidal occlusion in eyes of pigmented rabbits. Drug doses of 0.16, 0.24, 0.32, and 0.4 mg/kg body weight were administered. Photosensitization was performed at a wavelength of 671 nm and an irradiance of 100 mW/cm(2) applying fluences of 5, 10, 20, and 50 J/cm(2). Results: Using liposomal ZnPc, occlusion of choroidal vessels was achieved without damage to the overlying neurosensory retina. A tight dose correlation was found with a drug dose of 0.32 mg/kg and a light dose of 10 J/cm(2) inducing a selective thrombosis of the subretinal capillary layer. Histology revealed a selective intravascular alteration of the endothelial cells. Conclusions: PDT using liposomal ZnPc allows occlusion of subretinal vasculature with maintenance of neuroretina and RPE. The destructive effect on choroidal vascular endothelium is intensive.},
   keywords = {choroidal vasculature
liposomes
photodynamic therapy
zinc(ii)-phtalocyanine
low-density-lipoprotein
receptor-mediated uptake
choroidal neovascularization
macular degeneration
endothelial-cells
therapy
verteporfin
angiography
model},
   ISSN = {0271-3683},
   DOI = {Doi 10.1080/02713680590968286},
   url = {<Go to ISI>://WOS:000231078000012},
   year = {2005},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
G. Schuele, H. Elsner, C. Framme, and J. Roider,
Optoacoustic real-time dosimetry for selective retina treatment, J Biomed Opt , vol. 10, no. 6, pp. 064022, 2005.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Schuele,
   author = {Schuele, G. and Elsner, H. and Framme, C. and Roider, J. and Birngruber, R. and Brinkmann, R.},
   title = {Optoacoustic real-time dosimetry for selective retina treatment},
   journal = {J Biomed Opt},
   volume = {10},
   number = {6},
   pages = {064022},
   note = {1083-3668 (Print)
Journal Article},
   abstract = {The selective retina treatment (SRT) targets retinal diseases associated with disorders in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Due to the ophthalmoscopic invisibility of the laser-induced RPE effects, we investigate a noninvasive optoacoustic real-time dosimetry system. In vitro porcine RPE is irradiated with a Nd:YLF laser (527 nm, 1.7-micros pulse duration, 5 to 40 microJ, 30 pulses, 100-Hz repetition rate). Generated acoustic transients are measured with a piezoelectric transducer. During 27 patient treatments, the acoustic transients are measured with a transducer embedded in an ophthalmic contact lens. After treatment, RPE damage is visualized by fluorescein angiographic leakage. Below the RPE damage threshold, the optoacoustic transients show no pulse-to-pulse fluctuations within a laser pulse train. Above threshold, fluctuations of the individual transients among each other are observed. If optoacoustic pulse-to-pulse fluctuations are present, RPE leakage is observed in fluorescein angiography. In 96% of the irradiated areas, RPE leakage correlated with the optoacoustic defined threshold value. A noninvasive optoacoustic real-time dosimetry for SRT is developed and proved in vitro and during patient treatment. It detects the ophthalmoscopically invisible laser-induced damage of RPE cells and overcomes practical limitations of SRT for use in private practice.},
   keywords = {Acoustics/*instrumentation
Animals
Computer Systems
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Equipment Design
Equipment Failure Analysis
Humans
Laser Coagulation/*methods
Lasers/*therapeutic use
Optics/*instrumentation
Radiation Dosage
Radiometry/*instrumentation/methods
Reproducibility of Results
Retina/pathology/*radiation effects/*surgery
Sensitivity and Specificity
Swine},
   year = {2005}
}
R Schuele,
Optoacoustic real-time dosimetry for selective retina treatment, J Biomed Opt , vol. 10, no. 6, pp. 064022, 2005.
DOI:Artn 064022 Doi 10.1117/1.2136327
File: WOS:000234859400024
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Schuele2005,
   author = {Schuele, G; Elsner, H; Framme, C; Roider, J; Birngruber, R and Brinkmann, R},
   title = {Optoacoustic real-time dosimetry for selective retina treatment},
   journal = {J Biomed Opt},
   
   note = {005XJ
Times Cited:17
Cited References Count:37},
   abstract = {The selective retina treatment ( SRT ) targets retinal diseases associated with disorders in the retinal pigment epithelium ( RPE ). Due to the ophthalmoscopic invisibility of the laser- induced RPE effects, we investigate a noninvasive optoacoustic real- time dosimetry system. In vitro porcine RPE is irradiated with a Nd: YLF laser ( 527 nm, 1.7- mu s pulse duration, 5 to 40 mu J, 30 pulses, 100- Hz repetition rate). Generated acoustic transients are measured with a piezoelectric transducer. During 27 patient treatments, the acoustic transients are measured with a transducer embedded in an ophthalmic contact lens. After treatment, RPE damage is visualized by fluorescein angiographic leakage. Below the RPE damage threshold, the optoacoustic transients show no pulse- to- pulse fluctuations within a laser pulse train. Above threshold, fluctuations of the individual transients among each other are observed. If optoacoustic pulse- to- pulse fluctuations are present, RPE leakage is observed in fluorescein angiography. In 96% of the irradiated areas, RPE leakage correlated with the optoacoustic defined threshold value. A noninvasive optoacoustic real- time dosimetry for SRT is developed and proved in vitro and during patient treatment. It detects the ophthalmoscopically invisible laser- induced damage of RPE cells and overcomes practical limitations of SRT for use in private practice. (C) 2005 Society of Photo- Optical Instrumentation Engineers.},
   keywords = {selective retina treatment
optoacoustic dosimetry
real-time dosimetry
laser
retina
randomized clinical-trial
macular degeneration
diabetic-retinopathy
photocoagulation
nanosecond
eye
temperature
generation
liquids
regimen},
   ISSN = {1083-3668},
   DOI = {Artn 064022
Doi 10.1117/1.2136327},
   url = {<Go to ISI>://WOS:000234859400024},
   year = {2005}
}
K Herrmann, and D. Pauleikhoff,
Photodynamische Therapie in der Praxis immer breiter eingesetzt., Beilage für "Der Ophthalmologe" , vol. 102, no. 6, 2005.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Herrmann2005,
   author = {Herrmann, K and Birngruber, R. and Pauleikhoff, D.},
   title = {Photodynamische Therapie in der Praxis immer breiter eingesetzt.},
   journal = {Beilage für "Der Ophthalmologe"},
   volume = {102},
   number = {6},
   year = {2005},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
F Kasahara, T Yokoyama, Y Hayashi, Y Kato, M Yamaguchi, and K Shiraki,
Postoperative results of distance stereoacuity in intermittent exotropia, Japanese Review of Clinical Ophthalmology , vol. 99, no. 3, pp. 246-249, 2005.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Hayashi,
   author = {Kasahara, F and Yokoyama, T and Hayashi, Y and Kato, Y and Yamaguchi, M and Shiraki, K},
   title = {Postoperative results of distance stereoacuity in intermittent exotropia},
   journal = {Japanese Review of Clinical Ophthalmology},
   volume = {99},
   number = {3},
   pages = {246-249},
   year = {2005}
}
S. Nakakura, K. Shiraki, T. Yasunari, Y. Hayashi, S. Ataka, and T. Kohno,
Quantification and anatomic distribution of choroidal abnormalities in patients with type I neurofibromatosis, Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol , vol. 243, no. 10, pp. 980-4, 2005.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Hayashi,
   author = {Nakakura, S. and Shiraki, K. and Yasunari, T. and Hayashi, Y. and Ataka, S. and Kohno, T.},
   title = {Quantification and anatomic distribution of choroidal abnormalities in patients with type I neurofibromatosis},
   journal = {Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol},
   volume = {243},
   number = {10},
   pages = {980-4},
   note = {Nakakura, Shunsuke
Shiraki, Kunihiko
Yasunari, Takaharu
Hayashi, Yoko
Ataka, Shinsuke
Kohno, Takeya
eng
Comparative Study
Germany
2005/05/14 09:00
Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2005 Oct;243(10):980-4. Epub 2005 Oct 20.},
   abstract = {BACKGROUND: Choroidal abnormality manifesting as a bright patchy lesion under infrared monochromatic light has previously been described in neurofibromatosis type I patients in whom the choroid appears normal under conventional ophthalmoscopic examination or on the fluorescein angiogram. We investigated the correlation between patient age and the number of choroidal abnormalities, as well as the anatomic distribution of choroidal abnormalities in the fundus. METHODS: We examined the fundus of 28 eyes in 14 patients with neurofibromatosis type I. Patients ranged in age from 2 to 38 years and were examined between April 2001 and April 2002 by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy with infrared monochromatic light (780 nm wavelength). We divided the fundus into five regions (one within the retinal vascular arcade and those supero-temporal, infero-temporal, supero-nasal, and infero-nasal to it), and lesions on the border between regions were assigned to the region containing the greater part of the lesion. We studied the total number of choroidal abnormalities and the correlation between the total number and age. RESULTS: A positive correlation was found between the total number of choroidal abnormalities and age (Spearman rank correlation coefficient, r=0.6209, P=0.0178). There was a significantly greater number of choroidal abnormalities in the arcade region than in the other four regions (ANOVA, P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Choroidal abnormalities tend to increase with age and are most often observed within the vascular arcade.},
   keywords = {Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Choroid/*abnormalities
Choroid Diseases/complications/epidemiology/*pathology
Female
Fundus Oculi
Humans
Lasers/diagnostic use
Male
Neurofibromatosis 1/*complications/pathology
Ophthalmoscopy/methods
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies},
   year = {2005}
}
G Schüle, and M Rumohr,
RPE damage thresholds and mechanisms for laser exposure in the µs to ms time regimen, Inv Ophthalmol & Vis Sci , vol. 46, no. 2, pp. 714-719, 2005.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Schüle,
   author = {Schüle, G and Rumohr, M and Hüttmann, G and Brinkmann, R},
   title = {RPE damage thresholds and mechanisms for laser exposure in the µs to ms time regimen},
   journal = {Inv Ophthalmol & Vis Sci},
   volume = {46},
   number = {2},
   pages = {714-719},
   year = {2005}
}
E. Poerksen, H. Elsner, G. Schuele, P. Hamilton, H. Laqua, and J. Roider,
Selective retina treatment (SRT): Clinical investigation of an optoacoustic on-line dosimetry control, Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science , vol. 46, 2005.
File: WOS:000227980400286
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Poerksen2005,
   author = {Poerksen, E. and Elsner, H. and Theisen-Kunde, D. and Schuele, G. and Hamilton, P. and Laqua, H. and Birngruber, R. and Brinkmann, R. and Roider, J.},
   title = {Selective retina treatment (SRT): Clinical investigation of an optoacoustic on-line dosimetry control},
   journal = {Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science},
   volume = {46},
   note = {Suppl. S
911CZ
294
Times Cited:0
Cited References Count:0},
   ISSN = {0146-0404},
   url = {<Go to ISI>://WOS:000227980400286},
   year = {2005},
   type = {Journal Article}
}
C. Alt, C. Framme, S. Schnell, H. Lee, and C. Lin,
Selective targeting of the retinal pigment epithelium using an acousto-optic laser scanner, J Biomed Opt , vol. 10, no. 6, pp. 64014, 2005.
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Alt,
   author = {Alt, C. and Framme, C. and Schnell, S. and Lee, H. and Brinkmann, R. and Lin, C. P.},
   title = {Selective targeting of the retinal pigment epithelium using an acousto-optic laser scanner},
   journal = {J Biomed Opt},
   volume = {10},
   number = {6},
   pages = {64014},
   note = {1083-3668 (Print)
Journal Article},
   abstract = {Selective targeting of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a new strategy for treating certain retinal disorders while preserving adjacent photoreceptors. The treatment currently relies on a complex laser system to produce the required microsecond pulse structure. In our new approach, we scan the focus of a continuous-wave (cw) laser beam with acousto-optic deflectors to produce microsecond-long exposures at each RPE cell. Experiments were performed in vitro with a bench-top scanner on samples of young bovine RPE and in vivo on Dutch belted rabbits with a slit-lamp adapted scanner. Effective dose 50% (ED(50)) for RPE damage was determined in vitro by fluorescence cell viability assay and in vivo by fluorescein angiography. Damage to individual RPE cells was achieved with laser power on the order of 100 mW. Using separated scan lines, we demonstrate selectivity in the form of alternating lines of dead and surviving cells that resemble the scan pattern. Selectivity is also shown by the absence of retinal thermal coagulation in vivo. Selective RPE damage is feasible by rapidly scanning a cw laser beam. The scanning device is an attractive alternative to conventional laser coagulation and pulsed laser targeting of the RPE.},
   year = {2005}
}
H. Elsner, S. Liew, C. Klatt, P. Hamilton, J. Marshall, E. Porksen, H. Laqua, and J. Roider,
Selective-retina-therapy (SRT) multicenter clinical trial: 6 month results in patients with diabetic maculopathy, Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science , vol. 46, 2005.
File: WOS:000227980401487
Bibtex: BibTeX
@article{Elsner2005,
   author = {Elsner, H. and Liew, S. H. M. and Klatt, C. and Hamilton, P. and Marshall, J. and Porksen, E. and Laqua, H. and Brinkmann, R. and Birngruber, R. and Roider, J.},
   title = {Selective-retina-therapy (SRT) multicenter clinical trial: 6 month results in patients with diabetic maculopathy},
   journal = {Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science},
   volume = {46},
   note = {Suppl. S
911CZ
1463
Times Cited:0
Cited References Count:0},
   ISSN = {0146-0404},
   url = {<Go to ISI>://WOS:000227980401487},
   year = {2005},
   type = {Journal Article}
}